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dlgilbert
06-17-2005, 10:23 AM
I was just curious as to how many folks wear their felt hats in summertime? I'm in southern Pennsylvania where it gets hot and humid in summers (ugh!) so I mostly wear straw in summer, but every now and then, when it's not TOO hot, I break out a felt fedora.

What's the hottest the weather can be before you say "No way!" to felt?

jamespowers
06-17-2005, 10:44 AM
I was just curious as to how many folks wear their felt hats in summertime? I'm in southern Pennsylvania where it gets hot and humid in summers (ugh!) so I mostly wear straw in summer, but every now and then, when it's not TOO hot, I break out a felt fedora.

What's the hottest the weather can be before you say "No way!" to felt?

I know what you mean but I do wear felt when it is hot. It just depends on the weight of the felt. I wouldn't wear my heavy felts in hot weather but I would wear a Playboy without a liner or one of many WWII era felts that are light felts without liners. The Playboy has vent holes in the crown of the felt so it isn't too bad. So do many Featherweight Champ hats. If you can find a felt hat made for hot weather then it won't be much worse than wearing a straw hat. My great grandfather used to be famous for wearing felt hats and long sleeve shirts in hot weather. His explanation: "What keeps out cold keeps out heat." ;)
I wear a felt hat in Vegas during a 130 degree day. Talk about hot! The funny thing is that the hat kind of kept me cooler in the shade created by it. The hat was a lightweight felt but maybe Great-Grandfather had the right idea. :p

Regards to all,

J

jamespowers
06-17-2005, 10:47 AM
I just found this ad after I posted my response. Maybe it can give you an idea of the light weight hat made for hot weather I was trying to describe.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v331/jamespowers2005/dobbs52airflo.jpg

Regards to all,

J

Victor
06-17-2005, 11:54 AM
I have seen a hat like that. It had a series of small vent holes that were punched in the top of the crown. You couldn't really see the holes unless you looked closely. Looked interesting but wasn't my size so I let it go. I wonder how much vents really help.

jamespowers
06-17-2005, 12:02 PM
They help. Believe me. ;)

Regards to all,

J

Matt Deckard
06-17-2005, 12:02 PM
I have seen a hat like that. It had a series of small vent holes that were punched in the top of the crown. You couldn't really see the holes unless you looked closely. Looked interesting but wasn't my size so I let it go. I wonder how much vents really help.

I had a hat with vents, and still have my Campaign hat which has vents. I think the vintage Borsalino corrugated front that allows air to come in at your brow works well for keeping a felt hat cool, though you will still overheat under any fur felt if the temp is right and you are moving enough.

jamespowers
06-17-2005, 12:33 PM
I think the most efficiently vented hat is the Champ featherweight. A double row of holes around the entire crown, ventilated ribbon and ventilated sweatband really makes a difference. It is probably better than the Borsalino---in my opinion. ;)

Regards to all,

J

riccardo
06-17-2005, 12:40 PM
Great thread,
i always ask myself it...i'm very curious about summer felt hat ( i live in sicily-south Italy ) here someone (only old men) wear cotton cloth hat, but i don't like them, may anyone post any summer felt hat pics?

Hi, thanks.

Best regards.

Riccardo.

jamespowers
06-17-2005, 01:04 PM
I could not get ahold of some pictures I have on my home computer but this will give you some idea what we mean by perforated felt for ventilation.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v331/jamespowers2005/hatperf2.jpg

This is an ad for a lightweight Dobbs in 1945:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v331/jamespowers2005/1945Dobbslightweights.jpg

Regards to all,

J

Biltmore Bob
06-17-2005, 05:32 PM
I have a gray felt Biltmore C crown that I wear in the summer if it's
a raining.

Kaleponi Craig
06-17-2005, 05:53 PM
I was just curious as to how many folks wear their felt hats in summertime? I'm in southern Pennsylvania where it gets hot and humid in summers (ugh!) so I mostly wear straw in summer, but every now and then, when it's not TOO hot, I break out a felt fedora.

What's the hottest the weather can be before you say "No way!" to felt?

My fur felt hats are pretty heavy, so I usually only wear them in colder months (when it's 60 or so or less) and my Panamas in the summer. However, today it's cold and rainy here in the SF Bay Area, so on came the fur felt.

Regards, Kaleponi Craig

Pen Collector
06-19-2005, 05:44 AM
that looks like a Dallas Cowboy hat (Fedora). The color, the star.....
That would have been the perfect hat for Tom Landry.

Michael Mallory
06-19-2005, 07:01 PM
I wear felts in the summer chiefly if it's after dark. Or cool. I was at a party in Zuma Beach Saturday night, wearing my Montecristi, and completely paranoid that the wind would rip it off my head and blow it into the pool or the fire pit, or that a sea gull would...well, you know. I wish I'd worn a felt!

jamespowers
06-20-2005, 10:07 AM
that looks like a Dallas Cowboy hat (Fedora). The color, the star.....
That would have been the perfect hat for Tom Landry.

I know what you mean. I still have not run down the history on that hat. It is just as interesting to guess though. ;)

Regards to all,

J

Michaelson
06-20-2005, 10:31 AM
I've been amazed at how cool my new Camptown hat has been so far this summer. Usually I just soldier on wearing my standard felt leather banded fedoras, and perspiration runs down the side of my face all day long. Not with this Camptown, as it has the ventilated roan sweatband, and I can actually FEEL anytime any sort of air movement takes place around the hat, as it moves through the band and cools the head. I'm MUCH more comfortable with this type band, and I really wish more hatmakers would offer this option for us. Regards! Michaelson

Feraud
06-20-2005, 11:17 AM
..Not with this Camptown, as it has the ventilated roan sweatband, and I can actually FEEL anytime any sort of air movement takes place around the hat, as it moves through the band and cools the head. I'm MUCH more comfortable with this type band, and I really wish more hatmakers would offer this option for us. Regards! Michaelson Now that is a wonderful option to have on a hat! I have heard good things about the Camptown hat. I hope to order one soon.

I do not have a straw hat so I am working with felts. I have brown but wanted a lighter color hat to absorb less heat.
What I will be wearing this summer is my Stetson Open Road (http://www.thefedoralounge.com/showthread.php?t=3437). The color is tan and the hat feels very light on the head.

qwerty
05-30-2006, 07:21 AM
It seems that everyone here agrees that in summer it is too hot to wear a fur felt hat.
If it is so how come that Indiana Jones wears his fedora all the time. In Raiders of the lost ark ho goes to Egypt, knowing what to expect. It is hot and dry, but he is still wearing his fedora. Is it just a gimmick or is it OK to wear a fur felt fedora in the summer?
Also in Australia fur felt fedoras are national treasure. Do not forget about cowboy hats, too.
So?

Feraud
05-30-2006, 07:27 AM
Indiana Jones can do it because..he is Indy!! :D
If you are willing to deal with the heat and sweat you can wear your fur felt hat year round. I have worn my rabbit felt Akubra in the summer. It is hot but do-able. I just received a beaver Adventurebilt. The felt is so dense I do not think I will wear it in the Summer. With three or four hats in stock I do not need to stick to one hat all year.

Visigoth
05-30-2006, 07:59 AM
In anything short of sweltering heat, I'm happy in a light-colored fur-felt fedora, without a lining. (I'm in the habit of taking linings out of hats, unless they're valuable vintage items.)

J. M. Stovall
05-30-2006, 08:14 AM
Last month I went to the airshow down in Galveston. That morning I was looking at my vintage Dobbs straw, and a light tan vintage Stetson fedora and was thinking the same thing, how guys never seem to wear straw in those old photos. So I went with the felt and you know what, all day long on the tarmac in the Texas sun and I never felt hot. This hat even has the liner too. I wear my straw a lot and sometimes sweat up a storm. Maybe someone here to try and get a juicy government grant to study this.

ortega76
05-30-2006, 08:34 AM
I think it's largely due to personal choice. There's always that guy sweating in a blizzard or freezing at high noon on Miami Beach. As for Indy- well he may just prefer the hat for "luck" or to have something a bit more solid on his head while battling Nazis and seeking fortune and glory!

Lieutenant
05-30-2006, 08:51 AM
Felt hats and leather shoes / boots just can not be outdone no matter what the weather.

tonyb
05-30-2006, 09:05 AM
I tend to perspire quite a bit, such that I've left sweat stains on some of my lids, both fur and straw. So I've taken to using another of those men's accessories that seems to have fallen by the wayside--the handkerchief. Wallet in the right rear pants pocket, handkerchief in the left. I often leave it out for a couple of minutes after mopping my noggin with it. In warm weather, that's about all it takes to dry out.
As I mentioned several months ago in another thread, there are things to place on the sweatband to absorb sweat. I first saw one such item at a local hat retailer. It's a small strip of a thin, quilted, absorbent paper product with a Post-It-like adhesive on the back. I can't recall exactly what they retailed for, but it was something like three or four or five bucks apiece, which seemed kinda pricey, considering that they appeared to be made of essentially the same stuff as panty liners, which cost, oh, a few cents each. But at about 2 1/2 inches wide, panty liners are too large for this purpose, so I cut 'em in half lengthwise, peel off the backing and slap those suckers onto the sweatband, front and back. They will start to delaminate after a few days of exposure to significant sweating, but then I just take 'em out and replace 'em. That, in combination with the handkerchief, goes a long way toward keeping sweat from transferring through (and around) the sweatband and onto the ribbon and the hat body.
One caveat: Should you go this route, make sure you pick up a spare box of panty liners at the supermarket, lest other members of your household wonder what the hell happened to their personal hygiene products.

J. M. Stovall
05-30-2006, 09:17 AM
I use a handkerchief too, but I think I'll pass on the panty liner. If I do sweat a lot in a hat I clean the leather and condition it that night. I also do that to any hat I wear during the week on Sunday. That seems to go along way towards preserving the leather. Since I only wear vintage I'm pretty paranoid about them.

tonyb
05-30-2006, 09:32 AM
I use a handkerchief too, but I think I'll pass on the panty liner. If I do sweat a lot in a hat I clean the leather and condition it that night. I also do that to any hat I wear during the week on Sunday. That seems to go along way towards preserving the leather. Since I only wear vintage I'm pretty paranoid about them.

Yeah, I baby my old lids too. It's not that there aren't lots and lots of nice old hats still out there, but the supply isn't infinite, and the prices are rising.

RedPop4
05-30-2006, 09:47 AM
J.M. Stovall :offtopic: We happened to be visiting the Lone Star Flight Museum when the B-17 returned from the big show in Wisconsin. They let us out the back door to the tarmac, and it taxied right to about 15 feet in front of us. Awesome.:offtopic:

Samsa
05-30-2006, 09:48 AM
It seems that everyone here agrees that in summer it is too hot to wear a fur felt hat.
If it is so how come that Indiana Jones wears his fedora all the time. In Raiders of the lost ark ho goes to Egypt, knowing what to expect. It is hot and dry, but he is still wearing his fedora. Is it just a gimmick or is it OK to wear a fur felt fedora in the summer?
Also in Australia fur felt fedoras are national treasure. Do not forget about cowboy hats, too.
So?

I watched Raiders of the Lost Ark for the first time last night and the same question occured to me. I haven't tried it yet, but after watching the movie am contemplating getting a light color fur fedora (I'm not sure I'm quite ready for the Indy style, though) and alternating between that and my straw.

Hemingway Jones
05-30-2006, 09:55 AM
It seems that everyone here agrees that in summer it is too hot to wear a fur felt hat.
If it is so how come that Indiana Jones wears his fedora all the time. In Raiders of the lost ark ho goes to Egypt, knowing what to expect. It is hot and dry, but he is still wearing his fedora. Is it just a gimmick or is it OK to wear a fur felt fedora in the summer?
Also in Australia fur felt fedoras are national treasure. Do not forget about cowboy hats, too.
So?
Well, ...Indiana Jones is a fictional character.

That being said, there are Panama hats and light weight summer felts that do the job. ;) :)

J. M. Stovall
05-30-2006, 10:04 AM
J.M. Stovall :offtopic: We happened to be visiting the Lone Star Flight Museum when the B-17 returned from the big show in Wisconsin. They let us out the back door to the tarmac, and it taxied right to about 15 feet in front of us. Awesome.:offtopic:

Still:offtopic: I like the Lone Star Flight Museum a lot, and prefer their airshow to the big Wings Over Houston show at Ellington Airfield. That one's just too big to be any fun anymore. The Galveston museum also has a great aviation library on the top floor. They don't let you take the books out, but I found some online after seeing them there.

gekisai29
05-30-2006, 10:19 AM
Remeber that The Indy's and the Cowboys of the world use their lids to ward off branches by tilting the head forward & too keep off the rain so these functions & not heat could dictate the choice

Magus
05-30-2006, 10:46 AM
Here in So Cal I wear both straw and felt in all weather. I have a couple of old beater felt fedoras, a 30-40's Lee Water Block with a all cloth liner and lots of moth munches is my current fav hot weather hat. I am a head sweat guy and I let nature take its designed course. A nice layer of sweat in the hatband and hat is very cooling on a hot day. (Of course I am talking everyday wear NOT suit wearinging dress-up wear) For that I do wear either but use a hankerchif to keep things neat.

qwerty
05-30-2006, 12:11 PM
I watched Raiders of the Lost Ark for the first time last night...
What?
It is so hard for me to comprehend.




Are tilly hats good for hot weather?

Chad Miller
05-30-2006, 12:39 PM
I would say it's perfectly fine to wear a felt fedora in the summer. In fact, I wore my Adventurebilt all weekend while doing some work in the garden. Yes, you do tend to sweat, but, as someone else noted, the sweat actually helps to keep the hat cool. I have a decent quality Panama hat, and the straw is so tightly woven that it doesn't breathe well, making it rather uncomfortable to wear in the heat. The felt, on the other hand, allows for air to circulate around your head.

Chad

Dixon Cannon
05-30-2006, 02:39 PM
...that's eight months a year in this part of the world! I have a Stetson Raiders hat with no lining that I wear as it only adds to the 'patina'! I don't want my other dressier Borsos and Marathon to start getting sweat lines and salt stains so they sit in air conditioned comfort for most of the year. It's easy to see why people are so casual in this heat and don't dress up... it's too freakin' HOT!! -dixon cannon

Samsa
05-30-2006, 02:57 PM
What?
It is so hard for me to comprehend.

I know, I know....I am rather culturally deprived, especially when it comes to movies. I'm working on it, though...

Pilgrim
05-30-2006, 03:14 PM
I have a friend who wears a Tilley to all softball tournaments - his daughter and mine play on the same team. I'm in my Panama or Open Road, he wears the Tilley. We're both happy.

feltfan
05-30-2006, 03:25 PM
Actually, it depends on the felt.
I have a vintage Stetson panama with a
tight weave and no liner that can be almost
as hot as some of my felts. I have felts,
like Resistol, Mallory, and Stetson Open Road
type hats that ride significantly higher over the
ears than your average fedora, and as a result
stay cooler. They are lighter colored, too.
Forget about my dark brown Cavanagh
fedoras on hot days.

But when it gets really hot, nothing beats a
panama with an "open weave" that allows
air to pass through.

Love to find a nice vintage pith helmet some
day and try that out. Comments on pith helmets
in the heat?

Bargepole
05-30-2006, 04:12 PM
I've mentioned Australia before... hat heaven... the first thing they say when you head for the bush (a.k.a. "Outback") is: you'll need a hat, mate.

Never saw a straw. Always Akubras. Every head had one. They seem to work just fine. At least, I never got sun/heatstroke. When in doubt, do as the locals. (But one thing I did use was a gizmo called a KoolIt. A sort of ultra-absorbent foam in a bandanna. Soak it in water, tie it loosely round your neck, and the water slowly evaporates. Apparently the body's thermostat, from a comfort point of view, is in the back of the neck. The combo of Akubra and KoolIt = no sunstroke and comfortable all day, even in temperatures of 115? and up.

Panamabob
05-30-2006, 04:37 PM
Semicalados that we just got up. Hot items this summer...

http://www.alpacagoods.com/MVC-028S.JPG
http://www.alpacagoods.com/MVC-029S.JPG

astaire
05-30-2006, 08:09 PM
what do you actually use to condition the sweatband after a hot day and plenty of sweat?

Thanks All.

tonyb
05-30-2006, 08:09 PM
How much for one of those babes, Bob? Is there a backlog?

Kaleponi Craig
05-30-2006, 08:41 PM
Aound town on a hot day I wear my Panama. But if I"m hiking up in the Sierra, on a camping trip or backpacking, I take my Adventurebilt, because I need a good strong hat in the great outdoors.

By the way, Indy would never wear anything but a fur felt. I just don't think he's a Panama kind of guy.

Tomasso
05-30-2006, 09:40 PM
The men(grandfather, father, uncles, etc..) in my family never wore felt in warm weather, always straw. My father "ran warm" so he would "push" the seasons(Memorial Day - Labor Day) in each direction. I couldn't imagine wearing a felt in 80 degree weather.

Panamabob, those Semicalados look fantastic, Looks like I may need another hat.;)

johnnycanuck
05-31-2006, 12:10 AM
As it has been said many times over it depends on the person. I have a Tilley hat that is great because if I sweat a lot I can just throw it in the washer, and I overheat and sweat easily. I have a few Akubra hats, my current summer one is a Military but I have been using a Snowy River for a few years now. I have a Federation that is older then that and has seem more action as well. I picked up a straw cowboy hat cheep last year for camping and this spring I picked up a Biltmore straw fedora. All work, I really dont find any cooler then another. For sunny weather if I am out for prolonged periods of time I prefer a wider brim then a fedora has. The straw lets in more light so it is brighter under them then in a felt or canvas. So I find sunglasses more important when wearing them. I would mention my pith helmet but I dont want to start anything here.

If it feels good to you wear it. As you said in Australia they wear felt hats all the time in the outback. In Alberta they wear felt cowboy hats all year round. As for Indiana Jones he is a fictional character so if it looked good on screen they did it. Yes he wore his hat everywhere but he also wore a leather jacket in the Indian mid day sun (temple of doom) I cant stand wearing a jacket in the mid day summer sun in Canada, didnt make much cense to me but it looked good on camera.

Thats my two cents worth anyway.
Johnny

feltfan
05-31-2006, 09:56 AM
As for Indiana Jones he is a fictional character so if it looked good on screen they did it. Yes he wore his hat everywhere but he also wore a leather jacket in the Indian mid day sun

"In tropical climes there are certain times of day
When all the citizens retire to tear their clothes off and perspire.
It's one of the rules that the greatest fools obey,
Because the sun is much too sultry
And one must avoid its ultry-violet ray.
The natives grieve when the white men leave their huts,
Because they're obviously, definitely nuts!

Mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun"

I am honestly interested in the efficacy of the pith helmet
in hot weather.

geo
05-31-2006, 10:11 AM
I think it depends on the level of humidity. Cowboys and Australians wear felt hats in sunny, hot and dry climates, when a felt hat protects against the sun. However, in a hot and humid weather, a felt hat causes intolerable levels of perspiration.

Prairie Shade
05-31-2006, 10:49 AM
Well, maybe just copperheads and rattle snakes come to think of it. When its over 95, there isnt anything going to cool your head except a bandana soaked in ice water. Panamas, classy! Milan weave cooler! Tilleys are very practical and quality, in the boonie hat area. Also washable!!!! Ballcaps = fried ears and neck. By the by, the military used to say to avoid sunstroke in the tropics, keep the sun off the nape of your neck, hence the extended brim in the back of Pith Helmets. Which by the way, are my personal favorite for EXTENDED wear in the sun. Not the various colonial versions, but the standard military style pith helmet which was available at numerous surplus stores. I said in a previous post, I purchased a case of 6 from Memphis and have 3 left. ANY hat that allows air to circulate between your pate and the surface of the hat will be cooler. An American style sun helmet does just that with an open type suspension system. Holy cow, I better get to work!! Regards, I have tossed my hat in the ring, or maybe swamp.

NewMexExpat
05-31-2006, 09:59 PM
First, a big Thank You to the group for the help I've received here as a guest.:eusa_clap

I first started "lurking" last fall when I finally decided to buy a "real" hat, after having worn (the same) Eddie Bauer wool lite felt for years and years. The comments of folks here really helped me in shopping. I ended up with a Lagomarsino Nutria which I really enjoy. But it's getting a bit hot for it here near St Louis, so I started looking for a straw hat, and came back here for "advice". I've lost a lot of sleep in The Fedora Lounge reading postings on Panamas, and hope to make an order this week.

Part of the reason I finally registered is because this forum seems by far the most respectful, knowledgeable and accepting I have seen online. I hope registration will let me get to know a little more about the people behind that knowledge and respect.

Regards,

Mark
(should I have posted this as Off-Topic?)

Tony in Tarzana
06-01-2006, 04:10 AM
I bashed my Akubra Federation Deluxe into a C-crown, and initially the inner part of the crown was touching my scalp. I reshaped it a bit a couple of days ago (while watching Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade :) ) so that there's about a half inch of clearance between my scalp and the crown, and now it's quite a bit cooler to wear on a hot day.

I have a Cuenca from Panama Bob on the way, and I recently won a vintage Open Road (with the cattleman's bash) on eBay, so they may end up being my hot weather hats.

I love the wide brim on the Fed when the sun is beating down, my neat little Resistol stingy-brim is pretty much useless under those conditions.

stylin
06-05-2006, 10:35 PM
I love my Feds but they are just to hot to wear in 80-90 weather! Oh well, I just wear my Kangol's until Fall...

Lumelux
05-27-2008, 04:16 PM
Hello to everyone here. As someone new to hat wearing and the FL, I was wondering what people thought about the wearing of a felt fedora during the summer months. I just purchased a Resistol grey fedora from ebay and want to wear it but I can wait until fall if a straw hat is more appropriate for warmer weather.

Rick Blaine
05-27-2008, 04:35 PM
Hello to everyone here. As someone new to hat wearing and the FL, I was wondering what people thought about the wearing of a felt fedora during the summer months. I just purchased a Resistol grey fedora from ebay and want to wear it but I can wait until fall if a straw hat is more appropriate for warmer weather.


Hiya Lumelux & welcome to TFL, good to see ya' here.
You lucky Canuckistanians can likely get away with such behavior. On the other hand we'uns down here are lucky to get 5 months of felt wearing in before summer returns. I guess the answer lies both in Geography & constitution. I get overheated above 75f and can barley stand anything on my head. Others here maintain they can wear a fur felt on the equator.
Use google search and you can find lots of back-and-forth here on the subject of summer felts.

Where in Canada are you?

ScionPI2005
05-27-2008, 04:35 PM
I've come to the opinion that it is a personal decision. There are plenty of folks around here who will wear a felt hat during the summer, regardless of whether it is featherweight or not. You can also find plenty of people here who don't wear felt during the summer.

It's difficult for me to wear felt during the summer. My body temperature seems to run on the high end a lot of the time, so I find felts to get uncomfortable during the summer; generally 70 degrees or higher.

You can certainly try wearing your grey Resistol during the summer, and you may or may not find it comfortable. Panamas and straws are great for summer though. It should be easy to find what works right for you.

HDRnR
05-27-2008, 04:38 PM
If my head is sweating I move to a Panama hat, thats my simple rule.

Dinerman
05-27-2008, 04:41 PM
I know I'm taking a felt on my summer camping roadtrip, because I think it'll do better in the rain, which I'm sure we'll get some of.

It's really all a matter of personal preference. It depends on the hat. I know ome of my light ventilated felts are cooler than my thicker milans,

frijoli
05-27-2008, 04:41 PM
I just purchased a Resistol grey fedora from ebay and want to wear it but I can wait until fall if a straw hat is more appropriate for warmer weather.

Just sell it to me since I was bidding against you. It probably won't look good on you anyway!:D

Clay

MAB1
05-27-2008, 04:47 PM
I don't like sweating up my lightweight felts, because of stains.

And my straws sweat me.

Honestly... my linen newsboys are the coolest. Not a lot of shade but, I was surprised how cool they are. No wonder they were a fave of golfers.

And a newsboy is a cap that shades the ears. A common complaint about baseball caps.

RPeers
05-27-2008, 04:50 PM
I'm here in Toronto and just purchased a lighter grey whippet to wear for the summer months, "weather" it will be nice enough to wear around town all the time or not is yet to be told but I am hoping that the light colour and the shade it will provide will out do the warmth of this concrete jungle. My 2 cents.

RPeers

Jfala
05-27-2008, 04:54 PM
Yep, I think this is a personal preference item - as well as your capacity for higher temperatures. I tried to wear my felts during some recent hot days here in Los Angeles, and couldn't stop sweating. Switched to my Panama Bob Montecristi, and that was much better. Also, just purchased a linen/cotton Newsboy cap at the Gap of all places. Looks good, is very light and great for higher temps.

:)

AlanC
05-27-2008, 05:11 PM
I've been wearing my Artlite quite a bit this spring, but with the temps in the upper 80s on Sunday I pulled out the Panama. It was amazing how cool it felt. Like Dinerman said, though, straw doesn't do too well with rain, and we've been having lots of that.

Lumelux
05-27-2008, 05:19 PM
I figured it would be too hot but just thought I'd ask in case there was some etiquette for summer months. To the first question, I'm in Oakville Ontario but we're moving to the US in a couple of months. Sorry I can't sell this one. It is actually better than I was expecting and fits perfectly. If all hats are like this one, I'll be buying more soon. At first I thought I paid too much but a new hat would be just as much or more. Thanks for everyone's input so far.

Mike

Rick Blaine
05-27-2008, 05:24 PM
I figured it would be too hot but just thought I'd ask in case there was some etiquette for summer months. To the first question, I'm in Oakville Ontario but we're moving to the US in a couple of months. Sorry I can't sell this one. It is actually better than I was expecting and fits perfectly. If all hats are like this one, I'll be buying more soon. At first I thought I paid too much but a new hat would be just as much or more. Thanks for everyone's input so far.

Mike

Yeah I can see that Ontario would get too hot & humid for felt. My wife is from Calgary & AB. is dry enough that you might get away with it all summer. However evaporative cooling is a concept we cannot quite master down here in Dixie...

Tony in Tarzana
05-27-2008, 05:41 PM
To me, it's all about the humidity. If it's hot and dry, I wear my lighter felts, as I think they offer better sun protection. If I hold my Panamas up to the sun, I can see a lot of light getting through.

If it's muggy, the Panama is the weapon of choice.

As for sweat staining, keep a spray bottle of water handy, and if the ribbon gets sweaty, spritz it all around to wet the entire ribbon evenly. That'll dilute the sweat and prevent those lines of salt and whatever from forming.

ScionPI2005
05-27-2008, 05:45 PM
Honestly... my linen newsboys are the coolest. Not a lot of shade but, I was surprised how cool they are. No wonder they were a fave of golfers.

And a newsboy is a cap that shades the ears. A common complaint about baseball caps.

I got my first linen newsboy about two months ago, a NY Hat Co. one. I have to say I'm rather pleased with it. I like the style, how casual it can be, and how comfortable it is as the heat increases.

grey ghost
05-27-2008, 06:23 PM
Living in Fla and near the beach I find wearing felt a bit challenging as to mix with the normal beach wear,,,,,,tommy b shirts and such...the panama's and straw seem to be the norm....

obviously the heat and humidity in the summer make felt a bit hard to wear.

However I am going to take a few felts with me to the west coast of fla on vaca,,,,,

I like them so I will take them,,,,,,,,,

Tomasso
05-27-2008, 06:41 PM
it's all about the humidity.
I agree, when the dew point climbs past 60 it's time for me to lighten up.

Colby Jack
05-27-2008, 07:57 PM
Welcome to the lounge!:eusa_clap
Where ya moving to in the US?

59Lark
05-27-2008, 08:55 PM
yesterday in ontario , we had a humid day and i wore my straw hat, milnano straw, today it cooled down and i throw a felt fedora back on. The leather band really starts me sweating if the temp is up, and the salt stains from the band. But you fellas, dont have old dirty hats to put on, for rain and such, having worn hat day in and out, i always have last years model for a rough second. The only thing that i desire is a nice milano straw hat, the one that i bought last year isnt a good fit, this large and extra large stuff is poop, i person needs to know their size, i hate hat companies that sell hats that generally sized. 59Lark.

Alon
05-28-2008, 12:05 AM
Before I knew anything about fedoras I bought myself a cheap Bailey's wool to take with me on a backpacking trip to Italy... in summer! Yes, it was hot, but the shade it provided was well worth it. It really depends on you, on the wardrobe, and how dutiful you are to fashion.

Tomasso
05-28-2008, 12:29 AM
It really depends on you, on the wardrobe, and how dutiful you are to fashion.How does fashion come into play?

Nick D
05-28-2008, 01:15 AM
I wear felt in all weathers, including summer heat.

Rick Blaine
05-28-2008, 03:33 AM
I wear felt in all weathers, including summer heat.


Mad dogs & Englishmen! ;)

59Lark
05-28-2008, 04:03 AM
:rolleyes: The only time i wear a hot felt fedora in the heat, is the exception of a funeral, black biltmore, black double breasted pin striped suit, tried this outfit on the weekend last for a wedding and it was too tight, time to cut back and loose weight and get the schwinn cruiser bicycle out. Other than wedding and funerals the felt hat stay on the shelf in the heat. 59Lark

MrFusion
05-28-2008, 06:09 AM
Sweat stains are my main concern. So I prefer a cheap, disposible hat of any sort if I'll be working up a sweat. And for better or worse, dark colored hats, although hotter, show the stains less.


I have the same concerns. I have packed up my felts for the summer and I am just itching to wear one.
Trying to save for a PanamaBob hat now.:D

Viper Man
05-28-2008, 06:34 AM
I usually switch to straw in the warmer months but I've been wearing my "Artlite" daily. It's not quite summer here yet. In fact, it was 75 degrees on Monday but when I woke up on Tuesday it was only 42! [huh]

As soon as it warms up for good I'll be bringing my favorite felts to Optimo for cleaning & blocking.

trummy
05-28-2008, 10:06 AM
The rules are simple.

1) A fur felt hat is a man's standard headgear year-round for business or in town.

2) Cloth caps or hats are appropriate for sport or the country.

3) From May 15 to September 15 you may substitute straw for fur felt.

Stan
05-28-2008, 11:45 AM
Hi,

Well, straw hat season is upon us here in NC. I wore a tan felt Open Road yesterday and it was decidely too hot. Today I wore a straw and with the clouds and showers that are upon us, it's a tad on the too cool side. I should have swapped the days I wore which hat. Hindsight - isn't it great?? :eusa_doh:

The first day I wore a straw hat down here this year was Easter Sunday, but I'd say I've had a straw on maybe ten days total so far. When not actively farming that, is. When doing the farm chores I've been wearing straw since the beginning of March. I was baling hay last evening and even a straw hat was too hot until the sun went down.

We're fast approaching the end of felt hat season here, though. I figure it's about time to box up all the felt hats and pull out all the straw ones - I have about six of each. I've still not been too badly bitten by the Hat Bug - yet - or so I keep telling myself! lol

I have a new Montecristi Panama from Bob out at Art's for a custom fitting job. I can hardly wait for that one to come back. At the time I ordered the Fino from Bob I also ordered a Grueso as my new farming hat. I like that Grueso so much more than the ancient straw farming hats I've used for 30-some years that I'm really looking forward to having a nice one as well. :D

In the meantime I have a couple others - a Dobbs 2-tone and a vintage Stetson straw Open Road - that I really like. I can wear those until the custom fitted one returns. That's one thing I have learned well from here - a custom fitted hat is *the* way to go! :D

Oh, and on the subject of sweat, here's what I do. I have an odd sized head (7 1/16 semi-long oval) so I usually get hats one size large (i.e. 7 1/8 reg oval).

I take a strip of 4" duct tape cut to fit the circumference of the hat. I double the tape over sticky to sticky. This forms a 2" high moisture barrier strip. You can use something else, of course, but I find that duct tape works well and certainly is cheap and easy to find.

This strip I put inside the hatband. Sometimes this strip is enough to pad the sweatband and sometimes not. If not, then I take some 4" x 4" gauze surgical sponge pads and cut them in half. This forms 2" tall x 4" long sizing pad strips. Some folks use felt strips, and those ought to be fine as well. I put these between the leather sweatband and the duct tape.

In practice, the duct tape prevents a lot of the sweat from migrating into the hat material. The gauze strips sometimes get pretty damp, but it's easy enough to pull them out and replace them. Gauze is cheap. :D

Later!

Stan

ADHD librarian
05-30-2008, 12:01 AM
Now that I have uncloaked I might as well post on this thread, which I find funny.
I lived for many years in Central Australia so I can say I have worn a fur felt when the ambient temp was in the high 40 C. (that's about 3000 in Fahrenheit I believe)

An ugly black 'The Arena' which I found by the side of the road was my choice for going out bush or a 'Cattleman' for around town (both Akubras).
The shade from a broad brim is worth it, although I do also have a Brigalow straw number but I much prefer fur felt so that just sits at home.

Tomasso
05-30-2008, 09:29 AM
I take a strip of 4" duct tape It's amazing how many problems duct tape solves. lol

KY Gentleman
06-03-2008, 09:34 PM
I'm watching a documentary on Sam Peckinpah's Western films and all these guys are trekking through the desert wearing felt hats.
If it was good enough for "The Wild Bunch"........you get my drift.;)

rbbrock
06-03-2008, 09:56 PM
The factors I would consider are not so much what "fashion" requires, but rather, if I wear a felt hat, will I sweat and, if so, is it a hat I don't want to stain?

GreyHat
06-03-2008, 11:53 PM
I will definitely wear a fur felt even when it is nice out.
Of course, if I had a panama, I would probably wear it, but you work with what you have.

swisslet
06-04-2008, 07:15 AM
I want to hear more from ADHD on the subject of Austalian felts. It's my understanding that most aussie bush hats (akubras and the like) are traditionally fur felt, and they wear these in some of the most extreme temperatures on earth! I know it's personal preference and that they breed these aussies tough....

Doctor Strange
06-04-2008, 07:57 AM
I got an Akubra Cattleman last year, specifically for summer use, in the off-white "Sand" color. With its ventilation holes, I was thrilled to find that it's no hotter than my usual panama. I've sweated in it plenty, but there's been no permanent staining so far: Akubra's felt is amazing!

http://i5.nyu.edu/~mm64/goldfarb/CATLMN1.JPG

indycop
06-04-2008, 02:02 PM
I got an Akubra Cattleman last year, specifically for summer use, in the off-white "Sand" color. With its ventilation holes, I was thrilled to find that it's no hotter than my usual panama. I've sweated in it plenty, but there's been no permanent staining so far: Akubra's felt is amazing!

http://i5.nyu.edu/~mm64/goldfarb/CATLMN1.JPG
Did you get it from Hatsdirect? I really like that one!

Doctor Strange
06-04-2008, 02:15 PM
Nope, I got it from Aussie Bush Hats and Oilskins. But I believe the Cattleman is Akubra's most popular style, you can get it from nearly any dealer.

The best price I've seen recently is at AustralianGear - just $104 including shipping (it's on page 2):

http://www.australiangear.com/product/bindex.php?product=akubrauniquer&fromw=menshatsuniquer

Woodfluter
06-04-2008, 02:32 PM
I think the notion of heat and felt being incompatible is greatly exaggerated.

Here in Atlanta, the temperature today was mostly around 90F (32C), and reached a high per my outdoor thermometer of 95F (35C). I've been wearing my modified Akubra Riverina all day, on various outside undertakings, and it was quite comfortable. (Yeah, I sweat a lot.) This hat did start with four eyelets, and it now has 14 including two at the front, and the lining is gone.

http://img205.imageshack.us/img205/4294/riverina7lb0.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By woodfluter (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/woodfluter)

I think some of the issue is humidity rather than heat. Not sure about this, but Oz might be a little more like our American west. When I visit in Utah, I find that I'm comfortable over a much wider range of temperatures, both hot and cold, than here in Atlanta. The difference is the dry air out there. ADHD mentioned Aussie temps of 40C, which is 104F. I've known folks in south Texas that routinely wear felt in those temperatures. One added custom ventilation by shooting it through the crown with a .22!

I think felt can work with heat depending on:
1. Humidity (something you can't control).
2. Fit - air can circulate around the sweatband somewhat.
3. Ventilation - some holes may help.

I don't think color matters for much, as witness those Arabs that wrap themselves in dark wool to cope with desert heat. Yeah, it absorbs more, and it radiates better (black-body radiation for the technically inclined) as long as there's some room for circulation.

But when there's no sun and it's still hot and humid, sorry to say but no hat at all is best!

- Bill

ADHD librarian
06-04-2008, 04:51 PM
I want to hear more from ADHD on the subject of Austalian felts. It's my understanding that most aussie bush hats (akubras and the like) are traditionally fur felt, and they wear these in some of the most extreme temperatures on earth! I know it's personal preference and that they breed these aussies tough....

You're right,
most Aussie hats are fur felt and they get worn all year round. That said, there is an appalling lack of hat wearing in Australia.
Like America, most kids wear baseball style caps and most adults don't wear a hat at all. At least not around the cities. And the cities is where most Aussies live, this tough bushman image is all myth, we are the most urbanised nation on earth. That said, once you do get out of the cities you'll see a lot more hats and they are generally fur felt. There are more straw cowboy hats around the rodeos and bush races than there once were and the leather hats are getting a following amongst townies who wish they lived out bush.

As for summer,
I've worn fur felt all year round for most of my life. Even when I was living in Alice Springs. The hats just cope well with the conditions and in fact (until I read this thread I hadn't ever thought about the season determining my hat).
Likewise, none of my hats are especially sweat stained. The old Arena was filthy all over but cleaned up nicely. My cattleman (which is the one I've had longest) is a lightish coloured hat and it has no sweat ring around the band.

So, in short...
felt hats are for all year round,
most Aussies are a weak bunch of City Folk who lie when they tell you they wrestle crocodiles
most Aussies will be dead of skin cancer within a fortnight unless they immediately buy a good hat

ADHD librarian
06-04-2008, 05:05 PM
I think some of the issue is humidity rather than heat. Not sure about this, but Oz might be a little more like our American west. When I visit in Utah, I find that I'm comfortable over a much wider range of temperatures, both hot and cold, than here in Atlanta. The difference is the dry air out there. ADHD mentioned Aussie temps of 40C, which is 104F. I've known folks in south Texas that routinely wear felt in those temperatures.

Australia is quite a large place, so the range of temperatures and humidity varies.
Central Australia is dry almost 100% of the time.
The East coast (where most Aussies Live) has very high humidity in summer.
The Top End (Crocodile Dundee Country) doesn't have Summer and Winter it is tropical and has the Wet and the Dry (two seasons), during the wet the humidity is usually about 1000000% and you can see the rain falling hitting the road and evaporating instantly. It's like living in a steam room for five months a year.
But still, people there wear fur felts (straw won't keep the rain off, actually nothing keeps that rain off)
Then there is the West Coast, which can be hot and wet or hot and dry
South Aus, which is usually not so hot and is dryer in summer than winter
And Tasmania which is colder and wetter

So I guess I'm not going with your theory of why fur felt,
sorry.

swisslet
06-05-2008, 12:27 PM
Australia is an amazing country. I loved my short visit (highlight being the week I spent in the Northern Territories), and I can't wait to go back. I plan on wearing my Akubra fur felt (a Fed IV) all summer... not that an English summer really compares, but it's coming to the Glastonbury Festival with me (which is usually wet) and it's also going to be my main travelling hat too, replacing my Barmah foldup leather hat - also australian of course!

I don't think my Akubra will be afraid of a little sweat....

Brian Sheridan
06-05-2008, 02:01 PM
In the movies of the period, I see many, many men wearing felt hats to baseball games, to work, etc...Did alll of this movies take place in the fall? I rarely see guys wearing a straw hat (unless is a boater or they are playing dixieland jazz) or a panama (unless it is a South of the Border movie).

It makes sense to wear a cool straw in the summer. Maybe back then, they were too expensive for the masses, so men just wore the same hat all year round.

J.T.Marcus
06-09-2008, 02:40 PM
It was in the low 90's today, with a heat index near 100. I wore an old Resistol Open Road (Silverbelly) for 2 1/2 hours, while walking around downtown, in and out of antique stores. At the end, there was absolutely no stain on the felt. It didn't blow of my head, either. (There was a steady, moderate wind.) :)

By contrast, I have a brown fur felt, with vent holes and no liner. But, it tends to stain at the front ribbon area. Light or dark felt will make a big difference!!!

bolthead
06-09-2008, 02:46 PM
It makes sense to wear a cool straw in the summer. Maybe back then, they were too expensive for the masses, so men just wore the same hat all year round.
__________________
BRS

I have to say, not all Straws are cool in the hot summer sun. I personally sweat like a nervous groom in most of mine. [huh]

Nathan Flowers
06-09-2008, 03:49 PM
I wear a Tilley Airflo when I'm doing something strenuous in the hot and humid weather we've been having lately. I don't want to sweat up my panamas or felt fedoras.

Woodfluter
06-09-2008, 07:50 PM
This past Saturday my wife Carole and I strolled around the Virginia-Highlands festival in Atlanta for about 2-1/2 hours. I wore a Stetson Open Road Silverbelly, she wore stylish straw.

The temperature was in the mid to high 90's. Very little, occasional breeze, mostly dead air.

We passed by hundreds of people, probably a couple of thousand. The crowd, by my estimate, were:
- 95% bareheaded.
- 3% baseball caps.
- 2% straw hats.

I saw one other person in a felt hat of some sort. Most interestingly, I saw one young man wearing what appeared to be a Panama, and I'd swear it was a Montecristi or a very fine Cuenca. Never got a chance to talk to him. He had the brim cocked up on one side and down on the other - looked sharp.

I found the OR to be fairly comfortable, certainly better than hatless, but by the end a little sweat had wet the front of the felt near the brim. It dried and left no residue.

I wore my Akubra Riverina for several hours the preceding week, in very hot weather, doing work on a fence. This is the one I made into a warm-weather lid by removing lining and adding a bunch of eyelets. Sweat never made it to the front of the felt. I think it was noticably cooler than the Stetson. In dryer weather, probably not much difference.

Oh, BTW I agree, the Tilly Airflow is a good hot, muggy choice. You can even dunk it in a bucket and use that to keep cool!

- Bill

jkingrph
06-11-2008, 06:31 PM
I wear a Tilley Airflo when I'm doing something strenuous in the hot and humid weather we've been having lately. I don't want to sweat up my panamas or felt fedoras.

That is exactly how I handle the heat and humidity here. If I am to be doing anything to generate a lot of sweat which does not require much effort on my part I wear a Tilley, or for yard work a cheap ventilated fedora from Tractor Supply, twill brim and top and heavy nylon mesh on crown sides. I generally take it to the shower with me and rinse it out and let dry, and of course the cotton twill part tends to fade, but who cares.

Spellflower
06-11-2008, 08:31 PM
The temps were up near 100F in Brooklyn this week, and the humidity was such that you could pour a cool glass of water, put it in a bowl, and in a minute you'd have another glass worth from condensation. But I didn't leave the house without a good piece of felt on my head.

Mostly I wore my Resistol Ten, because it's got a good brim, and is a lighter weight felt than some of my others.

Was I hot? Yes. Did I sweat? Yes. Did I take the hat off and wipe my head with a handkerchief often? Yes. Did I regret wearing it? No.

Hey, it's summer time- it gets hot. But I haven't found anything that keeps the sun AND the rain off as well as felt, at least nothing that won't scare little children.

I'll also note that I saw MANY Orthodox Jews wearing the same large fur hats and coats that they wear all year round. This leads me to believe that comfort level is really pretty subjective, or dare I say, psychological. If you decide it's crazy to wear felt, you'll feel hot and wish you'd worn something else. But if you're resigned to wearing it, you'll stop thinking about it, and it won't bother you.

Havana
06-12-2008, 08:48 AM
I sweat a lot and I wear my felt hats regardless of the heat. I usually take two equally long pieces of duct tape and stick them together so there's no sticky part explosed. I then take that single piece and tuck it around the inside of my crown, behind the sweat band. I've found this blocks the sweat from reaching the felt and you can pull it out at anytime with no damage to the hat. I still have to watch for forehead sweat. If I look down, it can run down the brim which also leaves a stain. I am convinced that humidity is the real issue. I've been more sweaty and "hot" wearing my hat in 90+ degree weather and high humidity in South Carolina than while wearing the same hat in Africa in 120+ heat and very low humidity. http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e397/templr/actionshots484.jpg

John in Covina
06-12-2008, 09:08 AM
I am convinced that humidity is the real issue. I've been more sweaty and "hot" wearing my hat in 90+ degree weather and high humidity in South Carolina than while wearing the same hat in Africa in 120+ heat and very low humidity. http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e397/templr/actionshots484.jpg
*****************
In the American South West most of the time when it is hot it is also dry, very low humidity. I have noticed that at the low humidity end the sweat can evaporate almost immediately, so that one doesn't get as soaked as one might in a high humidity place like NYC or LI in the summer.

John in Covina
06-12-2008, 09:09 AM
I wonder if you could "cure" a hat by dunking it in salty water and drying it, such that sweat would no longer leave a visible stain?
****
I think plain or distilled water would remove more of the stain than salt water.

Havana
06-12-2008, 09:13 AM
I agree. Aren't sweat stains composed mostly of salt residue? I don't see how adding more salt can help. I've experienced sweat stains which might be removable (mostly visible on ribbons) but I've also seen discoloration of the felt which is permanent, unless you somehow redye the whole hat.

John in Covina
06-12-2008, 09:39 AM
I agree. Aren't sweat stains composed mostly of salt residue? I don't see how adding more salt can help. I've experienced sweat stains which might be removable (mostly visible on ribbons) but I've also seen discoloration of the felt which is permanent, unless you somehow redye the whole hat.
**************
Sweat usually contains water, salt and oils from the skin. Water will take out the salt but the oils are the challange. The oils attract dirt too but if cleaned with naptha/coleman fuel, it should clear all or most of the oil portion of the stain.

Sweat can be pretty potent, i guess for some of us it may be more acidic or something and able to attack a variety of materials. My sweat has taken the outer coating off of a couple of wristwatches, right down to the brass body.

J.T.Marcus
06-12-2008, 10:09 AM
The story has it that the way "Gatorade" was invented was that the Florida football coach scraped sweat off a player, and asked the Chemistry Department to duplicate it in the lab. Maybe we should wash our sweat stained hats in "Gatorade!" :D

tm3
06-12-2008, 08:00 PM
I sweat a lot and I wear my felt hats regardless of the heat. I usually take two equally long pieces of duct tape and stick them together so there's no sticky part explosed. I then take that single piece and tuck it around the inside of my crown, behind the sweat band. I've found this blocks the sweat from reaching the felt and you can pull it out at anytime with no damage to the hat. I still have to watch for forehead sweat. If I look down, it can run down the brim which also leaves a stain. I am convinced that humidity is the real issue. I've been more sweaty and "hot" wearing my hat in 90+ degree weather and high humidity in South Carolina than while wearing the same hat in Africa in 120+ heat and very low humidity.

that is a great tip.

i have been applying the duct tape directly to my forehead. this works, but i don't like dealing with the residue when i try to remove it at the end of the day.

FedoraFan112390
06-12-2008, 08:21 PM
The temps were up near 100F in Brooklyn this week, and the humidity was such that you could pour a cool glass of water, put it in a bowl, and in a minute you'd have another glass worth from condensation. But I didn't leave the house without a good piece of felt on my head.

Mostly I wore my Resistol Ten, because it's got a good brim, and is a lighter weight felt than some of my others.

Was I hot? Yes. Did I sweat? Yes. Did I take the hat off and wipe my head with a handkerchief often? Yes. Did I regret wearing it? No.

Hey, it's summer time- it gets hot. But I haven't found anything that keeps the sun AND the rain off as well as felt, at least nothing that won't scare little children.

I'll also note that I saw MANY Orthodox Jews wearing the same large fur hats and coats that they wear all year round. This leads me to believe that comfort level is really pretty subjective, or dare I say, psychological. If you decide it's crazy to wear felt, you'll feel hot and wish you'd worn something else. But if you're resigned to wearing it, you'll stop thinking about it, and it won't bother you.

Another Brooklynite here eh?

FedoraFan112390
05-16-2009, 07:38 PM
Here in NYC it gets to be about 85-95% as the summer really kicks in; I'm wondering if any of you live in a similar climate and if so do any of you wear felt in the summertime. I'd like to but I don't want to overheat!

scottyrocks
05-16-2009, 07:47 PM
As I just wrote in another thread, I work outside in July and August, and the only time I can tolerate a felt is when when rain is imminent or its actually raining. Then, my hat of choice is a big old brown Bailey western I have.

http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q269/erickvonzipper/me/0414091518-1.jpg

zetwal
05-16-2009, 07:56 PM
I do enjoy straws, but lightweight felt fedoras also suit me just fine during even hot summers. Of course it depends too on the amount time spent out doors and the activities involved.

Alucard73
05-16-2009, 08:03 PM
I do enjoy straws, but lightweight felt fedoras also suit me just fine during even hot summers. Of course it depends too on the amount time spent out doors and the activities involved.
+1. I also go with felt during inclemente weather.

Barrelhouse
05-16-2009, 08:14 PM
In the south the summers are not only hot as blazes but also very humid...not unlike the worst part of NYC summers. I personally never wear a felt hat in the summer unless its raining and even then i usually grab an umbrella instead. But there is certainly no rule of hat etiquette I ever heard of that says you can't/shouldn't wear a felt in the summertime.

Lets face it, if you go from an air conditioned home to an air conditioned car to an air conditioned destination what difference could it possible make? I think you should follow the dictates of your lifestyle and personal comfort level.

jpbales
05-16-2009, 08:32 PM
In the south the summers are not only hot as blazes but also very humid...not unlike the worst part of NYC summers. I personally never wear a felt hat in the summer unless its raining and even then i usually grab an umbrella instead. But there is certainly no rule of hat etiquette I ever heard of that says you can't/shouldn't wear a felt in the summertime.

Lets face it, if you go from an air conditioned home to an air conditioned car to an air conditioned destination what difference could it possible make? I think you should follow the dictates of your lifestyle and personal comfort level.

Yeah, it's really about what the situation dictates. Right now, it's still cool enough that felt can be worn in the evening or during inclement weather, but in the middle of a humid, east-coast summer it's almost always out of the question. I wore my Sunbody in the rain a week or so ago and it performed wonderfully. I put eyelets in it (at someone else's suggestion) and it keeps the hat pretty cool as well.
Sunbody + light rain jacket = dry, cool, happy camper. :D

Bingles
05-16-2009, 08:35 PM
Even though it is the middle of May.. on Sundays.. I find myself using my felt hats because the temp doesn't get above 52 degrees... the rest of the week is in the 60s and 70s, but on Sundays, for whatever reason... it stays cooler.


Yeah, it's really about what the situation dictates. Right now, it's still cool enough that felt can be worn in the evening or during inclement weather, but in the middle of a humid, east-coast summer it's almost always out of the question. I wore my Sunbody in the rain a week or so ago and it performed wonderfully. I put eyelets in it (at someone else's suggestion) and it keeps the hat pretty cool as well.
Sunbody + light rain jacket = dry, cool, happy camper. :D

John in Covina
05-16-2009, 08:44 PM
For me it does not matter whether the hat is furfelt or straw.

If it is the summer then my head is going to sweat with either of them on my head OR off.

THe thing is to take the hat off now and again to let your head get some air and cool off via evaporation. Having a hankie or bandana to wipe ones forehead and neck helps too.

But when it's hot out, unless the hat is made of ice, I am prepared for the idea of sweating profusely. And it is quite a bit less humid here than there, usually.

kaosharper1
05-16-2009, 10:13 PM
Having lived a long time in humid Massachusetts, and one summer here in the LA area, I can say that wearing a summer weight felt here is fine as long as its less than 90. Above that, its a panama.

In Massachusetts its a panama from June until September. Of course here it can be in the 90s until October.

indycop
05-16-2009, 10:32 PM
I wear felts year round.[huh]

WideBrimm
05-16-2009, 10:37 PM
What humidity? :eek: Thank goodness for DRY HEAT here in the West :D

Goose.
05-16-2009, 11:13 PM
I wear felts year round.[huh]
Ditto.
Yesterday, just under 90F. Felt.
Today, felt (same lid) until it hit about 94F.
Then the Capricorn went on when I started working in the backyard and while grillin'. I was chillin' :)

Here ya go...but keepin' in mind that humidity was about 25-30%. Black Fed on my head...


http://mongoose.smugmug.com/photos/534933721_DKcj2-S-1.jpg

Edward
05-16-2009, 11:50 PM
Wearing felt this last couple of weeks in Beijing, with a lowish humidity and heat generally around the upper 20s / low thirties c. The felt in quseti0n is my safari-ised Akubra Riverina, which does at least have a couple of air-holes in each side. I would be more comfortable in straw in this heat, but it was only really pracitcal for me to bring one hat, and so the felt won out as being also suitable should it rain.

duggap
05-17-2009, 05:39 AM
I started my hat wearing career several years ago with Panama hats. The truth of the matter is that a good Panama hat is way hotter than a light weight felt. My light weight Art stays in my summer rotation. If I am going to be outside for an extended period of time I wear the felt. It is cooler.:)

HarpPlayerGene
05-17-2009, 05:58 AM
For me it does not matter whether the hat is furfelt or straw.

If it is the summer then my head is going to sweat with either of them on my head OR off.

THe thing is to take the hat off now and again to let your head get some air and cool off via evaporation. Having a hankie or bandana to wipe ones forehead and neck helps too.

But when it's hot out, unless the hat is made of ice, I am prepared for the idea of sweating profusely. And it is quite a bit less humid here than there, usually.

Sums up my view perfectly.

From 3:30PM (peak heat of the day) to about 9:30PM, almost every day, I am outside doing caricatures. If there are handy chores to do, I'm outside all day. And I'm in one of the hottest, most humid states goin'. Still, it's both straws and felts for me throughout the summer.

In addition to occasionally removing the hat and wiping my brow with a bandana, I find that carrying a pocket comb helps a bit. To be able to drag the course tooth part through the hair and sweep it back seems to create ventilation to the scalp. After a minute with the hat off, I'm ready to plug it back on and go for another hour or two.

:)

thomasrodd
05-17-2009, 06:36 AM
Last year I installed grommets on two new hats --a fairly tightly woven panama and -- gasp! -- an akubra federation. These hats were too hot and thus pretty uncomfortable for me even in mild weather, -- I run hot-blooded, I guess.

The grommets I put in are about 3/8" brass; they may well be overkill, but they made a big difference in comfort, no beads of sweat on the bald pate.

One reason those very wearable canvas and nylon Tilleys have fairly large grommet holes in the crown may be assuring customer satisfaction.

scottyrocks
05-17-2009, 06:50 AM
I started my hat wearing career several years ago with Panama hats. The truth of the matter is that a good Panama hat is way hotter than a light weight felt. My light weight Art stays in my summer rotation. If I am going to be outside for an extended period of time I wear the felt. It is cooler.:)

Yeah, I was wondering about that. Ive had straw hats of different types on my head over the years, and the more expensive ones were the hottest because their weave was finer. The cheaper, coarser-weaved hats allow more airflow, which is what I need. Ive had hats with grommets in them and they might as well have not been there for the lack of coolness they provided.

Akubra Man
05-17-2009, 07:30 AM
Up just above the 49th parallel approximately 45 miles north of the US border at North Dakota, in Winnipeg, Canada summer temps will stay in the 80's and move into the 90's too ... I can only handle wearing straw. Right now it has been warm enough already for a few days to switch to straw. I like my straw hats as much as my felt ones so the change is a good one for me, but by the time September rolls around I am looking forward to wearing a felt hat again. Any other Winnipegers out there?

Rick Blaine
05-17-2009, 07:52 AM
Up just above the 49th parallel approximately 45 miles north of the US border at North Dakota, in Winnipeg, Canada summer temps will stay in the 80's and move into the 90's too ... I can only handle wearing straw. Right now it has been warm enough already for a few days to switch to straw. I like my straw hats as much as my felt ones so the change is a good one for me, but by the time September rolls around I am looking forward to wearing a felt hat again. Any other Winnipegers out there?

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g222/Greghats/simpsonswinnipeg.jpg

I was in Calgary in Feb. & 30 below is just too cold to wear a fedora. It was a toque for me. I have been there in August tho' & the heat is so dry a fur felt is very do-able. Down here in Dixie however, it's straw or cloth from now 'til October/November... >sigh<

Viper Man
05-17-2009, 08:00 AM
I own a few lightweight felts (my VS being the favorite) but I don't usually like to wear them when the weather gets above 70-75 degrees. However, I enjoy my straw hats quite a bit and I always look forward to the 4-5 months that I can wear them.

Fletch
05-17-2009, 08:05 AM
Never. My head is hot all summer, even under a light cotton or linen cap.

Neil
05-17-2009, 09:07 AM
Ugh. I know panamas are hot, too, but I cannot imagine wearing a felt in summer, even a light felt. It just seems a sweaty/greasy, hot, uncomfortable thing to do. I don't wear heavy wool suits or scarves in hot weather, either.

handlebar bart
05-17-2009, 09:18 AM
Need a poll.[huh] I wear the same fur-felt lids year-round.

Ordinary Guy
05-17-2009, 09:34 AM
I guess I am an in between kind of guy...

Way too hot for me to wear felt, but I can get away with Panama.......[huh]

kaosharper1
05-17-2009, 10:17 AM
Ugh. I know panamas are hot, too, but I cannot imagine wearing a felt in summer, even a light felt. It just seems a sweaty/greasy, hot, uncomfortable thing to do. I don't wear heavy wool suits or scarves in hot weather, either.

Depends on the weave. As nice as the high wpi panamas are to the touch, I never found them that practical. I go for medio-fino.

Unlike in the northeast, being in the shade makes a big difference in SoCal so a hat helps in hot weather when there's no humidity if you're in direct sunlight.

Slim Portly
05-17-2009, 10:41 AM
What humidity? :eek: Thank goodness for DRY HEAT here in the West :D
Indeed. At half-way through May we are already experiencing temperatures that hover at the century mark, and a long summer is not too far off, yet I am able to wear three-piece suits and fur felts as I wish. As Barrelhouse said, going from an air-conditioned home to an air-conditioned car to an air-conditioned office is not such a bad thing.

However, I have had my eye on a nice Panama...

Mid-fogey
05-17-2009, 10:58 AM
...for me between a fur felt fedora and a straw is the difference between stifling and just hot.

Marc C had a thread on ventilating fur felts. He'd done a pretty good job of it.

Wearing no hat is worse - I went for a short walk the other day and the sun was very bright. I could feel the uncomfortable warmth on the top of my head from no shade at all.

Straws as an alternative? My straws are not really as good as they could be. Held up to light, one shows pinpoints of light and the other, a tightly woven shantung (whatever that is) shows none at all. As a side note, isn't a point of pride of authentic Panamas that they will hold water? Wouldn't that keep trapped heat in the hat?

I'm sorry that boaters have drifted to the edge (perhaps over the edge) of costume wear. Some of them have a very open weave that seems perfect for ventilation.

Of course there's always the plantation inspired golf hat. Those usually have a solid top for solar cover but a completely open basket weave around the sides. They aren't always the best looking, which is probably attributable to cheapness of manufacture and a lack of conscious styling. They're not really dress hats.

Trebuchet64_Fal
05-17-2009, 11:21 AM
I only wear fur felt if the conditions suit , otherwise i wear either my Akubra Hayman or my Akubra Capricorn , they are both light and well ventilated and look good enough to be worn any where.
I choose to wear those hats to save my felt hats from sweat marks as much as anything.

avedwards
05-17-2009, 01:14 PM
Here in Britain the weather may be quite horrible a lot of the time, but one advantage is that felts can be worn nearly all the time. I can count the days it was over 30C last year on my fingers. Even when it gets that warm, I think you can have the choice of straw or felt (if you take the hat off to cool down as suggested previously).

As for whether it is socially acceptable to wear felt in summer, Bogart does in Casablanca. During the scene where he is out during the day he wears his fedora. Considering that everyone else is in straw or pith helmets it must be warm. Then again, I have seen no pictures of Bogart in straw, please correct me if I am wrong.

MattStat
05-17-2009, 01:32 PM
FedoraFan112390, I'm in the city, too, and wear felt most of the summer, though a light colored one, but I go for straw or a cap when wearing light-colored linens. Keeping the sun off the head really brings the temp down, even if it's felt.

irb
05-17-2009, 04:06 PM
Oh, no. Not in 110F heat, on a bicycle. Down here in AZ it's Panama Hat weather now.

Fletch
05-17-2009, 05:40 PM
110F on a bike? Only headgear I'd be wearing is a helmet with an ice bag on top!

rrog
05-17-2009, 08:44 PM
I wear felts year round.[huh]


No eyelets for ventilation? It was down your way that I wore my Sunbody back in March and decided that I needed eyelets. I could see wearing felt with eyelets, but couldn't imagine wearing one without. :fing28:

rrog

ortega76
05-17-2009, 08:52 PM
I'll wear my felts at night but rarely during the day. Way too hot and humid here in Illinois.

indycop
05-17-2009, 09:13 PM
No eyelets for ventilation? It was down your way that I wore my Sunbody back in March and decided that I needed eyelets. I could see wearing felt with eyelets, but couldn't imagine wearing one without. :fing28:

rrog
No eyelets, though I am not against them.

AtomicEraTom
05-17-2009, 09:18 PM
I've been looking for a nice lightweight straw for the summertime. I don't usually wear a hat in the summer, besides a ball cap when doing outdoor chores, painting, etc. But even without a hat, a Brylcreemed pomp likes to melt like a hot candle all over the place!

elvisroe
05-18-2009, 02:48 AM
Not too many Aussies weighing in on this one yet, but most places here are pretty much hot all year round and in the bush the Akubra is an institution.

Where I grew up in outback New South Wales the temp is regularly up over 110 in summer and if you work outdoors it's pretty much all felt. (Caps are for tractor drivers!) My father inlaw works in agriculture out west and I have never known him to be without his "Squatter" rain, hail or shine. I also had a lightweight squatter (with the pork-pie beat out of it!) when I was a teenager and never found it too hot for work...in fact a good trick on a really hot day was to wear it wet and let the evaporation cool you off.

I think the difference is that the felt works in a dry heat because you don't tend to sweat much. When living in the tropics some years later I found the leather band would irritate my forehead...so I ripped it out which is probably considered a crime on this site.

You could always invest in a pith helmet...
but my vote is "man up" and stick to your hat!;)

metropd
05-18-2009, 03:00 AM
I"m always in a fur felt fedora in the summer including when I'm in Houston or really muggy places, I'm talking 105 degrees plus.:) I walked around town in ST Helena, CA in my VS beaver fedora and a 1930's double breasted suit in a
117 degrees. I'm just too hot to stop.

stibbons
05-18-2009, 03:18 AM
Another Australian here, and I'm wearing felt year-round.

Sydney is fairly temperate. There was a very hot, very humid heatwave in January, but I managed to avoid it on holiday in Tasmania. :) Warmer climes, as elvisroe mentions, are also a lot drier. In those sorts of conditions, I don't think the felt feels any hotter than a straw.

daizawaguy
05-18-2009, 03:39 AM
It`s all about humidity. I think our Ozzie friends wear their Akubra all year round, but its in a very dry heat. Humidity brings out the sticky sweaty feeling...and the felt just does not work in this environment...

Dewhurst
05-18-2009, 04:14 AM
I wear felt all year long. Straw comes out during summer, but it really is like wearing a plastic bowl on my head because most of my straw hats have fairly tight weaves without any significant built-in ventilation and they simply refuse to breathe as a result.

Oddly, I don't find leather sweatbands or felt uncomfortable when I am sweating a lot.

Thwack
05-18-2009, 04:25 AM
I've only had a few chances to wear a felt in the 90+ heat so far but I wore my dark brown fed iv both days out in the blazing sun and didn't feel too worse for it. I'd take it off to cool down once and a while but with the sun beating down on me I felt much better when I put it back on.

Goose.
05-18-2009, 08:56 AM
I"m always in a fur felt fedora in the summer including when I'm in Houston or really muggy places, I'm talking 105 degrees plus.:) I walked around town in ST Helena, CA in my VS beaver fedora and a 1930's double breasted suit in a
117 degrees. I'm just too hot to stop.
"I'm just too hot to stop". That's a great line.

As I posted earlier, I wear felt all year (but never my white one after Labor Day ;)), if it gets too toasty like yesterday (mid 90's), it's straw or plastic (Capricorn/Hayman).

Really just wanted to chime in on Metropd's post lol

Carlisle Blues
05-18-2009, 09:09 AM
The moment it reaches 65 degrees (give or take) it is Panama city for me.

I love my felts, but, straw is my hat of choice. :)

avedwards
05-18-2009, 09:42 AM
I"m always in a fur felt fedora in the summer including when I'm in Houston or really muggy places, I'm talking 105 degrees plus.:) I walked around town in ST Helena, CA in my VS beaver fedora and a 1930's double breasted suit in a
117 degrees. I'm just too hot to stop.
I'm seriously glad it doesn't get that warm in the UK. How do you manage not to ruin the suit? :eek: Stuff cool packs under your shirt? I can understand the felt hat all year round, but anything over 25C and only light weight summer sport coat with no tie for me.

John in Covina
05-18-2009, 10:01 AM
Not getting too hot in the summer has it's advantages.

Here in the US, the use of air conditioning is nearly 100% for businesses that cater to the public. In the summer when it is hot out a lot of people go from their air conditioned car to the air conditioned building to the air conditioned business and so on, spending as little time out doors and in the heat as possible.

A similar phenomanon occurs when visiting Las Vegas in the summer, the heat can be oppressive even if in shorts and sandals. You move in the shadows, staying indoors and in the A/C as much as possible. The humidity is usually very low there so if you do sweat and there is a breeze it evaporates almost instantly. The evaporation is so fast that in 110 degree plus weather if it's breezy you will get a chill hopping out of the hotel swimming pool! Being in the sun at those high temps feels a lot like standing next to a big oven with the door open and the broiler is on full blast.

We work at keeping the sweating to a minimum, I guess.

Anyway, a wide brim hat in the summer whether fur or straw or cloth is good to keep the sun off the head and neck.

Mahagonny Bill
05-18-2009, 10:15 AM
I was planning on getting a new panama this summer, but after reading this I might go with a Akbura squatter instead. Is the modern squatter light weight enough for summer? What other modern hat brand/model would you consider as light felt?

Pacific NW summers are usually 70-90 degrees F with relatively low humidity, so my real goal to to keep the sun off my giant red noggin.

John in Covina
05-18-2009, 10:19 AM
My Squatter in Moonstone is my favorite hat to wear year round. It is fairly light weight felt thinner than some modern Stetsons, tighter felt.

CRH
05-18-2009, 07:45 PM
My Squatter in Moonstone is my favorite hat to wear year round. It is fairly light weight felt thinner than some modern Stetsons, tighter felt.

Is this one a Super Fine Feather Weight, John? If so we're certainly looking for some educated opinions in "Akubra Overload" about it.

John in Covina
05-18-2009, 09:54 PM
Nope, I don't think so, it doesn't say anything about being lightweight. I got it from David morgan's web site.

tortswon
05-19-2009, 03:10 AM
I live in downtown Philly which is located in the Delaware River Valley. July/August temperatures and humidities routinely run in the 90's. I wear my fur felt hat all summer because I have found the perfect sub-hat accessory.

If you Google insulin cooling wallet, you can find self chilling cases for two syringes, These are run under cold tap water for about two minutes after being initially activated. Dry the case and place it under your hat. There is zero condensation and the pack will keep cool for hours. You can recharge it by going to the men's room and running it under cold water for two minutes. Dry it and you are ready to go again. The chemicals in the bog cool so no ice, no muss, no fuss. I've worn mine under an Art Fawcett heavy weight felt in the 90's with no problem. DO NOT PUT THE COOLING BAG INTO THE OUTER BAG FOR THIS. For those with large crown westerns, larger packs are available. No prescription is needed. Here are some links:

http://www.diabetesandmore.com/FRIO-Mini-P979C10.aspx

http://www.diabetesandmore.com/FRIO-Individual--P153C10.aspx

http://www.medicool.com/diabetes/diabetes_travel_frio.php?gclid=CPf46s2QyJoCFQSPFQo dfmei2w

This has worked well for me during the summer allowing me to wear fur felt. It's also pretty good if you are outdoors doing chores or just walking around. Hope this helps! Best, Sam

daizawaguy
05-19-2009, 04:30 AM
Now this is novel, Sir! I may be missing something, but where do you place this bag...on your head under the hat!!?

Jabos
05-19-2009, 05:00 AM
Tortswon-what a great idea. Thanks for sharing because I can think of a million uses for one in addition to the hat.

scottyrocks
05-19-2009, 05:06 AM
tortswon,

Never mind under the hat, this looks like a great answer for my insulin. I've been using medicool freezer packs and case for years, but I like this idea better. Thanks for the heads-up!

tortswon
05-19-2009, 08:03 AM
The pack can be placed on the head and then the hat placed over it (like catchers used to do with cabbage leaves). For something a tad more elegant, I have fitted some hats with a pouch fabricated from an old stocking fitted into the front of the hat as close as possible to the forehead without deforming the hat. Sometimes it is funny watching people with sweat pouring down their faces with a cap on or nothing and I'm cool as a cucumber with my refrigerated fedora.

One of the nicest things about it is the rechargability by immersing it for two minutes under cold running water and a quick towel dry. Hope this helps! Best, Sam

PS You can get these from many more places than the links from the previous posts and I am not endorsing any particular store or product.

John in Covina
05-19-2009, 08:32 AM
Simply amazing!

Inusuit
05-19-2009, 08:44 AM
It's dry heat in Wyoming, so I wear felts all year around to work, to town, out to dinner, fishing mountain trout streams. The only straw hat I own is a 3.5 brim Sunbody. I wear it if I'm working hard and long enough to raise a prolonged sweat, or using the tractor in hot and dirty conditions.

Edward
07-05-2010, 10:12 AM
It has now hit that time of year here in London when I can only rarely (usually on wet days) wear most of my fur felts. Predominantly, I am in cotton caps and straws at present. The one fur I can wear and have worn in extremes of temperature is my safariised Akubra Riverina. I keep the lining in it (I know some remove), but the big difference is made by the eyelets allowing much of the heat to escape. It's no match for a panama on the hottest of days, but that said, a much better all-rounder, as it can cope with rain. I wore it in the extremes of heat in Bangalore last month (up to 38C in the afternoon there), actually in preference to a panama I also took with me. I've also worn it on several trips to China. In 2008, I toured the Eastern side of China for the guts of three weeks extremes of heat in Beijing, Xi'An, Guilin... and the most severe rain in 125 years in Hong Kong. The Akubra was superb in all. I do find I sweat much more, or, more accurately, I am much more aware of sweating, out the top of my head than was the case before I started to shave my head. This does make me wish that Akubra, and others, would favour black or dark linings in place of white, which can get nasty sweat stains on it. The white lining in my Riverina has interesting reddy-brown tide marks where, when new, I sweated dye out of the hat band into the lining.... still, it's not visible when worn, and it does protect the felt itself from such stains...



Love to find a nice vintage pith helmet some
day and try that out. Comments on pith helmets
in the heat?

I have a fondness for the American style pith helmet which stems from Hunter S Thompson.... the illustrations in Fear and loathing in Las Vegas always looked to me more like a pith helmet than the cloth-type I later realised it actually was (as per Johnny Depp in the film). They strike me as marvellously practical; for hiking / camping in hot weather, I'd be keen on one, though they're perhaps a bit "costumey" for wearing about town. That said, most folks probably view even the most simple of panamas as costumey, so.... [huh]

BanjoMerlin
07-05-2010, 11:04 AM
My typical summer hats are lightweight, light colored fur felt. Open-weave straws don't give me the UV protection I need and the tight-weave Panamas don't breathe all that well.

There's also that cooling trick of dipping your hat in water and wearing it while it dries that just doesn't work out well with straw.

If it is sunny but not too hot I'll grab a Panama.

John in Covina
07-06-2010, 08:06 AM
I tend to wear furfelt fedoras mostly but switch to my panama for a casual look.

I mentioned this elsewhere but Cowboys "On the Range" tended to stick with furfelt year-round.

The things is for me to remember if my head is getting too hot under the hat take it off, wipe with hankie, allow to breathe / evaporate and replace when a bit cooler.

If you look at old pictures 1930's and 40's you will see that the number of straw hats increases in the summer months but furfelt fedoras and cloth caps don't vannish from the scene.

Also for me getting a few hot and sweaty days in a new fedora goes along way towards breaking it in. I use hats cause I am a pale white guy and need to keep from getting sunburned constantly - that leads to skin cancer and such. Want to avoid!

fenris
07-06-2010, 08:15 AM
Here in the Philippines we only have two kinds of weather... HOT or HOT & RAINY.

I still wear fur felt despite the weather. I take it off when I'm too hot and use the hat as a fan - hehehe.

There are tons of straw hats here (ranging from dirt cheap to $100 panama hats), but none I've found suits me. I guess I'm just too used to seeing the Indy-styled hat on my head that I feel that tapered crowns look weird on me.

Edward
07-06-2010, 09:21 AM
I use hats cause I am a pale white guy and need to keep from getting sunburned constantly - that leads to skin cancer and such. Want to avoid!

I hear ya. Taken me ten years in the hot climes of London to go white (being a Celt, I'm naturally a pale blue)... I'm sure it's no coincidence that, while I have worn various hats to keep in the heat in the Winter and the Sun off in the Summer over the past fifteen years or so, my interest in hats really took off when I started shaving my head in mid 2006....

tnitz
07-06-2010, 10:46 AM
I, (like many of the cowboys around here - I'm not one) wear a silverbelly hat in the summer - it keeps the intense sun off your head and out of your eyes.

Most summers I have worn a straw hat while working down at the rodeo grounds, weedeating. It's an old beater and the only hat I've grown attached to, especially after it spent a winter in a snowbank. Anyway, I used to like it best because I could soak it and wear it which kept it cooler.

However, I recently refurbished my old Akubra Military slouch since I never wore it. I've been wearing it since and find that it's actually cooler than the straw (when wet, straw does swell and close up). I do have sweat on the top of my head, but as already mentioned, it helps to cool it down. I don't generally like the grommets, but it's true that they and the missing liner help alot. Also, the slouch is what I would call a darker color and I haven't found that really changes much.

In other words, my recent experience suggests to me that a felt can be just as cool as straw, maybe even cooler. Also, while I once did wear good light panamas working, they were never really durable enough for that and a more durable straw is typically also hotter. And they aren't very cheap these days.

But, just remember, that combination of sun's heat and sweat are going to affect the felt. I would also recommend a high crown, myself, to provide breathing room up there.

Unca Dusty
07-06-2010, 11:03 AM
Actually, it depends on the felt.
I have a vintage Stetson panama with a
tight weave and no liner that can be almost
as hot as some of my felts. I have felts,
like Resistol, Mallory, and Stetson Open Road
type hats that ride significantly higher over the
ears than your average fedora, and as a result
stay cooler. They are lighter colored, too.
Forget about my dark brown Cavanagh
fedoras on hot days.

But when it gets really hot, nothing beats a
panama with an "open weave" that allows
air to pass through.

Love to find a nice vintage pith helmet some
day and try that out. Comments on pith helmets
in the heat?

Pith helmets (the classic cork and canvas) are ridiculous tropical head wear. No ventilation and no opportunity to wick away perspiration. I tried out a surplus U.S. Marine pith (WWII vintage, I think) in the desert of Southern New Mexico. Man, it was dry heat but my head under the helmet was still drenched (most of the piths I have seen have support structures around the sweat band so there is room between your head and the helmet--but the helmet is shaped in such a way that there is no circulation in this space). I can't imagine how hellish it would be in humid conditions. And they are very heavy for a warm weather cover.
I agree with you about felts and straws. My "breeziest" hat has such a loose weave that I don't think it is really protecting my melon from solar radiation--it's like a bunch of holes sewn together with straw...

The answer is: get a hat for every conceivable situation!

danofarlington
07-06-2010, 11:51 AM
Pith helmets (the classic cork and canvas) are ridiculous tropical head wear. No ventilation and no opportunity to wick away perspiration. I tried out a surplus U.S. Marine pith (WWII vintage, I think) in the desert of Southern New Mexico. Man, it was dry heat but my head under the helmet was still drenched (most of the piths I have seen have support structures around the sweat band so there is room between your head and the helmet--but the helmet is shaped in such a way that there is no circulation in this space). I can't imagine how hellish it would be in humid conditions. And they are very heavy for a warm weather cover.
I agree with you about felts and straws. My "breeziest" hat has such a loose weave that I don't think it is really protecting my melon from solar radiation--it's like a bunch of holes sewn together with straw...

The answer is: get a hat for every conceivable situation!
I'm originally from the Minneapolis area, and have worn hats there visiting once or twice a year; but I was the only one as far as the eye could see. What is the hatwearing quotient in Minneapolis from your point of view? Here in Washington, I see few good hats (not that they aren't there but I just don't see it), but definitely more than in Minneapolis. When I was young in Minneapolis in the 1960s, apart from the long-hair and freak styles, there was a heavy intolerance of anything that deviated from bland casual clothes there. In other words you'd get mocked for wearing something out of the ordinary. By the way it was about the same in Denver where I lived for two years subsequently. I hope it's different now. I've been away for 30 years.

Unca Dusty
07-06-2010, 12:14 PM
I'm originally from the Minneapolis area, and have worn hats there visiting once or twice a year; but I was the only one as far as the eye could see. What is the hatwearing quotient in Minneapolis from your point of view? Here in Washington, I see few good hats (not that they aren't there but I just don't see it), but definitely more than in Minneapolis. When I was young in Minneapolis in the 1960s, apart from the long-hair and freak styles, there was a heavy intolerance of anything that deviated from bland casual clothes there. In other words you'd get mocked for wearing something out of the ordinary. By the way it was about the same in Denver where I lived for two years subsequently. I hope it's different now. I've been away for 30 years.

It's probably still pretty thin--although it is not that different than other parts of the U.S. that I have visited. On the positive side I have seen many more hats in the past 10 years than I used to (again, that might also be a trend that mirrors the rest of the country--I don't really know. 20 years ago people in this area treated a person wearing a hat as an oddity and did that kind of passive/hostile thing where they either stared or politely looked away...now I get compliments on my hats more often than not. Walked passed a frat bar the other evening in my gray fedora and heard some intoxicated college kid yell "Nice lid, man!"-- that would not have happened two decades ago.

danofarlington
07-06-2010, 12:19 PM
that would not have happened two decades ago.
It would not have.

Neophyte
07-06-2010, 12:38 PM
After taking the liner out of my Akubra Fed IV, I can wear it in the summer, no problem.
I live in East Tennesse, and it reaches about 97 degrees most days. I'm not sure what it's like where you live, but I myself have not had a problem.

David Conwill
07-06-2010, 01:34 PM
Well, ...Indiana Jones is a fictional character.

My first thought as well. That and Its because pith helmets remind him of Belloq. :D

Seriously, though, Ive seen numerous pictures of working-class folk (especially farmers) wearing felt hats in what appears to be summer weather. It makes me think straw hats are something of a luxury item, and not particularly durable for men of action and toil.

-Dave

leo
07-06-2010, 03:36 PM
...wear a silverbelly hat in the summer - it keeps the intense sun off your head and out of your eyes.
...sweat on the top of my head, but as already mentioned, it helps to cool it down.
...my recent experience suggests to me that a felt can be just as cool as straw, maybe even cooler...

Exactly. There's a reason desert folks for centuries have kept their heads (and bodies) covered.

Too hot? Wear nothing but flip-flops and shorts in the sun for a few hours and see how cool you are. lol

Blackthorn
07-06-2010, 05:10 PM
I wore a Stetson Temple to an outdoor funeral in a heat wave in Sacramento last year and was surprised how much cooler it was than no hat at all (I took it off during the prayer and couldn't believe how fierce the sun was). And the only comments I heard (7 or 8 of them) were that I was the only one there with the common sense to wear protection from the sun. I didn't own a panama hat at that time, but that might have been a better choice in hindsight.

danofarlington
07-06-2010, 06:31 PM
I wore a Stetson Temple to an outdoor funeral in a heat wave in Sacramento last year and was surprised how much cooler it was than no hat at all (I took it off during the prayer and couldn't believe how fierce the sun was). And the only comments I heard (7 or 8 of them) were that I was the only one there with the common sense to wear protection from the sun. I didn't own a panama hat at that time, but that might have been a better choice in hindsight.
Maybe so weather-wise, but I think a felt is more fitting for a funeral. I view Panamas as kind of festive and carefree.

Rick Blaine
07-06-2010, 07:14 PM
After taking the liner out of my Akubra Fed IV, I can wear it in the summer, no problem.
I live in East Tennesse, and it reaches about 97 degrees most days. I'm not sure what it's like where you live, but I myself have not had a problem.


Fellas...down here, it's not the heat, it's the stupidity, er, humidity, I mean.
Neo, I don't see how you can do it. After 70f I just cannot abide felt here in Knoxpatch, I do so wish I could.

Really I can see it could work out west in a drier heat, say 20 percent humidity, at least you would have evaporative cooling. Down here, nada. NO. SUCH. THING.

And fenris, I am in awe of you. I don't see how you could wear felt AT ALL, EVER in S. E. Asia, my gawd.

On the other hand, ol' Johnny C. I'll have you know the very first (of many) trips I have made to Calgary was on 3 June in '99... & IT WAS SNOWING! (and me w/ my Panama) >harumph<. Of course LAST time I visited, in Feb., it was -40... so,well, there you go.

Me, I have to have light straw or minimal cloth in these wet, still summers. To say nothing of a good handkerchief! Vents: mandatory!
I so look forward to October.

fenris
07-06-2010, 07:45 PM
And fenris, I am in awe of you. I don't see how you could wear felt AT ALL, EVER in S. E. Asia, my gawd.

Well, I don't stay that long outdoors. I'm usually in an air-conditioned mall. If I have to stay outdoors for a long time, I at least find a shady spot so I can remove the hat and fan myself with it.

HarpPlayerGene
07-06-2010, 09:55 PM
Here in Florida we get some of the longest, hottest and most humid summers anywhere. Still, I wear a hat every day. Sometimes felt, sometimes panama straw. Also, I am outside in it every day from around 2PM until 9:30PM or so which is the real peak heat period. The panamas are for clear sky days and the felts are for our afternoon thunderstorms. Both provide me with greater confidence in my 'look' as well as protection from the elements. In fact, I've been wearing brims so long (starting with westerns as a kid growing up around horses) that I would be decidedly UNcomfortable without one on.

I agree with the 'use a hanky to wipe your brow and give your head a breather now and then' camp. I've also learned that a simple pocket comb is a great tool for keeping cool. Dragging the large tooth portion through my mop sort of 'vents' my noggin down to the scalp. Very refreshing. After a minute, I put my hat back on and enjoy.

My only criteria for what hat NOT to wear in the summer is that there are several vintage felt fedoras with beautiful ribbons that I don't want to sully with sweat. But that leaves several hats that are used to it and don't get babied. :)

John in Covina
07-07-2010, 07:51 AM
I have several furfelt outdoor hats that are for more casual and outdoor work time. My outdoors and go to non dress up hats are from my Akubra line up: a brown Campdraft, Moonstone Squatter and a brown Bushman. These tend to be not worn during yard work or outdoor work.

For outdoor work I use an old JC Penny Marathon furfelt that has the liner out which is how I bought it- as a beater. I do yard work at home and at church in this hat. (I love it.)

I do have 2 straws for casual time, I forgot about one!

JimWagner
07-07-2010, 09:27 AM
I have an inexpensive Scala Panama that while it's not an open weave is far cooler in our NC heat and humidity than my best Panama. For that matter I've found almost anything cooler than a really tightly woven Panama.

For pure sun protection I prefer my Tilley, but it's strictly an informal knock around hat.

Continuing up the scale, light weight and light colored, e.g. Silverbelly, fur felt hats are bearable, but just barely around here. Plus they show sweat stains easily and are a bitch to clean after that.

I have a couple of Akubras that offer good sun protection, but they certainly aren't cool.

It would take a really formal occasion (like a funeral) for me to wear any of my better fur felt fedoras in this heat and humidity, and even then it's likely that I could get away with a Panama instead.

Bottom line, I'm most likely to be wearing that inexpensive Scala Panama in weather like we're having right now (96-100 degrees and high humidity).

AlterEgo
07-08-2010, 12:23 PM
I have hats similar to if not just like most of the ones that have been mentioned so far on this thread, so I decided to do a hot weather test on each of them.

But first, let me say that I perspire profusely, and currently the weather here in the Mid-South has seen temps consistently between 75 for an overnight low and 95 for the afternoon high, with humidity ranging between 80% in early mornings to 40% late afternoons.

Here's what I did: At 10:30 AM, when the temperature was about 85 and the relative humidity around 70%, the sky mostly sunny, and winds at 5 to 10 mph, I donned shorts, tee-shirt, and running shoes to head out for my usual one-hour power-walk (walking at a rapid 5+ mph with 3-lb Heavy Hands hand weights), taking the same route each morning. The only thing I changed each day was the hat.

The get a read on fur felt and the effect of hat color, I first compared two Akubras--my Lawson and Lightning Ridge. These hats are very similar, lined, with the thicker, denser Heritage grade of felt; the wider, softer reeded roan leather sweatband; and practically the same crown height and brim width.

They were both hot, but the dark fawn Lawson noticeably more than the sand Lightning Ridge. That Lawson is a chocolate brown while the LR is only a couple shades darker than white. So, a lighter color does make a considerable difference, yet the LR was still uncomfortably hot and sweaty. I would never choose to wear it in these conditions except for this experiment.

Next, I gave my old Aussie Military Slouch a go. Though this hat is British khaki in color--getting on towards a darker green--it is unlined, has ventilation holes, and is constructed of Akubra's lighter weight Superfine quality felt. Surprisingly, it was cooler than the LR, but still way too hot for me in the test conditions.

I put all three of my 2 1/2- X 3 1/2-inch-brimmed Tilleys to the test. Having the two big brass ventilation grommets on each side of the crown, and in the same khaki color, the traditional cotton duck one and hemp model are pretty much the same, and they were tolerable though not exactly comfortable. The Airflow was definitely the best. It's a lighter, "natural" color, in a very lightweght nylon material, with open mesh at the top of the crown, and a "Hydrofil" sweatband. The Airflow did a pretty darn good job of keeping the sun off, venting the hot air out, and soaking up the sweat. The green underbrim does a great job of reducing glare, too.

Next batters up were two unlined, approximately 3-inch-brimmed straws: a relatively cheapo Eddie Bauer Panama and my new Akubra Hemp Range. The tall, doofy-crowned EB is made of Toquilla fiber woven in what I'd estimate a grade 8 brisa pattern; has a thin, low-rent cotton hatband; and features a nifty sweatband that is both stretchy and absorbent. The great-looking Range has a very open weave section encircling the crown just over the black puggaree and a reeded roan sweat just like Akubra's standard-grade fur felt hats.

Due to its sweat, I expected the EB to be the cooler of the two, but the Range was clearly the winner, nearly as comfortable as the Tilley Airflow. I have an upper-mid-grade Featherweight Panama with a cotton sweat that I wear only for dress--seersucker suits, linen sport jackets, and such. It's quite cool, and weighs only 2 oz, but my salty sweat would most assuredly soak through and stain the black pug for all eternity, so, sorry, but I chose not to subject it to this test.

I also tested my two pith helmets.

One is an old one I got as a kid when I was going through my safari phase. In the style the French wore in Southeast Asia (later adopted by the American military), it's actually made out of some sort of molded plastic, covered in cotton khaki fabric on the outside, tinted dark green on the interior. I covered the bonded leather sweat inside that's somewhat deteriorated with a basketball sweatband, which soaks up sweat nicely and is quite comfortable. The sweat is mounted to the helmet with a sort of harness that keeps your head about an inch away from all parts of the inside except the sweat itself. That, plus the 13 holes in the crown, makes for an inherently cool design.

The newer helmet came from the only current source of real piths, Village Hat Shop, and is made in Vietnam of actual pith, which is, basically, cork. I got the British style like you see in the old Tarzan movies, khaki in color, with multiple vent holes. I was suprised at how nicely made this dirt-cheap helmet was. It's made with basically the same type of interior harness as my old one, but it adjusts easily for size with Velcro, and the sweat is covered in a Cool-Max type fabric, making it even more comfortable than my home-made rig. This real pith is, of course, lighter in weight, too.

Both helmets are quite comfortable, with the VHS taking the edge. I tried it both dry and dunked in water, which supposedly evaporates and makes the thing a measure cooler. I could not tell any difference. My test conditions were probably too humid for much if any evaporation to occur.

To be honest, what I usually wear on my power walks is a ball cap or visor, because I don't care if they get stained with salt and mildew, they keep the sun out of my eyes and rain off my glasses, and they stay on in the stiffest of winds, so I tested a few of those, as well.

The coolest cap of all is a white nylon mesh thing. Among others, light color was more effective in coolness than ventilation holes. However, all visors no matter what color were cooler than any cap, despite that they they leave my dark brown hair (OK, there's some gray in there) exposed to the sun. Of course, caps and visors do not shade the rest of your head and leave the neck particularly vulnerable, unless you get one with the "camel jockey" feature, so this category is not really comparable to hats with brims.

Based on these findings, the coolest hat for both hot and humid conditions is a pith helmet, but many consider such a hat to be over-the-top and unacceptable from a style/social acceptablitiy standpoint. And they will cause you to say things like, "Timba, ungowa!" and have people asking you, "Doctor Livingston, I presume?"

Next coolest was the Tilley Airflow. Speaking of style, well...

Close on the Tilleys' heals was the Akubra Hemp Range, followed by relatively loosely woven Panamas. Straws are undoubtedly the style leaders; however, if you get caught wearing one in a downpour, make sure money for a reblock is in the emergency fund and that you have a back-up until it is returned.

Finally, bringing up the rear were fur felts, the darker, denser, lined, unventilated one finishing dead last.

If you can comfortably wear a fur felt in hot and humid weather, you are a much cooler customer than I.

JimWagner
07-08-2010, 12:43 PM
Based on these findings, the coolest hat for both hot and humid conditions is a pith helmet, but many consider such a hat to be over-the-top and unacceptable from a style/social acceptablitiy standpoint. And they will cause you to say things like, "Timba, ungowa!" and have people asking you, "Doctor Livingston, I presume?"

I have a VHS pith helmet as well and wear it for doing yard work like cutting the grass. I agree that it's the coolest of hats and offers great sun protection. Can't quite bring myself to wear it anywhere but my own yard, though :cool2:

danofarlington
07-08-2010, 12:45 PM
I have a VHS pith helmet as well and wear it for doing yard work like cutting the grass. I agree that it's the coolest of hats and offers great sun protection. Can't quite bring myself to wear it anywhere but my own yard, though :cool2:
Thank goodness.:)

David Conwill
07-08-2010, 01:08 PM
I have a VHS pith helmet as well and wear it for doing yard work like cutting the grass. I agree that it's the coolest of hats and offers great sun protection. Can't quite bring myself to wear it anywhere but my own yard, though :cool2:

Do you use ear protection? Or is your mower silent (electric or rotary)?

-Dave

JimWagner
07-08-2010, 02:51 PM
Do you use ear protection? Or is your mower silent (electric or rotary)?

-Dave

My riding mower isn't so loud that I typically wear ear protection. I do wear ear protection with either of my electric or gas leaf blowers though. Then I wear active shooter's ear muffs or in ear custom molded plugs depending on whether I can accommodate the head band with the hat I'm wearing at the time.

I do wear Sorbothane padded gloves with all my lawn power tools.

HosManHatter
07-08-2010, 10:35 PM
I tend to have the sweating problem in Summer and perspire equally whether I wear felt or straw. Since I began wearing my hair very very short I`ve discovered that urban invention called the "do rag" (or "wave rag"). Don`t laugh...yet. I find a plain colored one in a breathable material like cotton and affix the "rag" to my dome before doffing my lid and....ta-DAA! It works for me but I get some looks or rolling eyes sometimes. That`s ok because I like keeping my hats from getting sweat stains on them and....




...ok...it does make you feel just a bit gangsta,dawg! :eusa_doh:

HMH

Edward
07-09-2010, 05:38 AM
The answer is: get a hat for every conceivable situation!


In this, we are in complete concorde. ;)

Edward
07-09-2010, 05:40 AM
Maybe so weather-wise, but I think a felt is more fitting for a funeral. I view Panamas as kind of festive and carefree.

I've worn a panama with black tie, but that was in the Summer, with an ivory, shawl collared jacket.... it did have a sort of raking appeal, but it's certainly not the most formal of hats. As funds allow, I plan to pick up a couple of Milano homburgs (one black, one 'natural') a la Poirot, for more formal occasions.

jbucklin
07-09-2010, 06:32 AM
It's amazing that in Texas I've been able to wear my FedIV Deluxe out since I got it two days ago. The weather here in Dallas is unseasonably cool due to overcast skies and occasional thunderstorms. Nice. Btw, it's interesting the way people look at me when I'm out and about with the Fed on my melon.
http://i771.photobucket.com/albums/xx359/fedoradude/Photo123.jpg

AlterEgo
07-09-2010, 08:41 AM
I tend to have the sweating problem in Summer and perspire equally whether I wear felt or straw. Since I began wearing my hair very very short I`ve discovered that urban invention called the "do rag" (or "wave rag"). Don`t laugh...yet. I find a plain colored one in a breathable material like cotton and affix the "rag" to my dome before doffing my lid and....ta-DAA! It works for me but I get some looks or rolling eyes sometimes. That`s ok because I like keeping my hats from getting sweat stains on them and....




...ok...it does make you feel just a bit gangsta,dawg! :eusa_doh:

HMH

I neatly fold a bandana into a narrow strip, tie it in a square knot behind my head, and, like you, wear it as a sweatband beneath my ball caps on my daily power-walk. In my pocket, I carry a matching one folded into a square to wipe my face. Always the fashionista, I have 40 pairs of bandanas in every conceivable color to coordinate with my work-out clothes and ball caps.

The ball caps are adjustable at the back with either Velcro or buckle closures, so it's not a problem fitting the bandana beneath. Of course, hats are not adjustable, so they won't fit over the bandana--unless I upsized them, then they'd be too big without it. I'm normally a 7 1/8, but, knowing I'd always wear a bandana beneath, I got my cotton duck and hemp Tilleys in 7 1/4. The newer Airflow has a "Hydrofil" sweatband that works great, obviating the need for a bandana, so there's no need to upsize it

HosManHatter, you may want to check out a newfangled type of "do-rag" I saw in a camping/hiking store recently. I cannot remember the name, but they are made out of a high-performance material which quickly wicks away sweat and evaporates fast, supposedly confering a cooling effect. But, brace yourself, they're around twenty bucks a pop.

danofarlington
07-09-2010, 08:50 AM
It's amazing that in Texas I've been able to wear my FedIV Deluxe out since I got it two days ago. The weather here in Dallas is unseasonably cool due to overcast skies and occasional thunderstorms. Nice. Btw, it's interesting the way people look at me when I'm out and about with the Fed on my melon.
http://i771.photobucket.com/albums/xx359/fedoradude/Photo123.jpg
Fedora in the summer harks back to the old days when men wore fedoras year round. So rather than pioneering new territory, you're really reviving an old tradition.

jbucklin
07-09-2010, 08:58 AM
Based on the seemingly total absence of fur-felt fedoras here in Dallas (with the exception of mine)---regardless of the time of year---I guess I was starting to fancy myself a true pioneer.

Dewhurst
07-09-2010, 12:19 PM
Based on the seemingly total absence of fur-felt fedoras here in Dallas (with the exception of mine)---regardless of the time of year---I guess I was starting to fancy myself a true pioneer.

:)

We have all fancied ourselves to be pioneers at some point.

danofarlington
07-09-2010, 12:30 PM
Based on the seemingly total absence of fur-felt fedoras here in Dallas (with the exception of mine)---regardless of the time of year---I guess I was starting to fancy myself a true pioneer.
Well then it's sort of like Bob Dylan. He was pioneering new music, but did it by harking back to tradition.

jbucklin
07-09-2010, 01:31 PM
Oh, now I will always welcome comparisons to Dylan. (Actually that's the first time it's ever happened).

billysmom
07-09-2010, 01:31 PM
Based on the seemingly total absence of fur-felt fedoras here in Dallas (with the exception of mine)---regardless of the time of year---I guess I was starting to fancy myself a true pioneer.

Ah, but we have them in Fort Worth! Saw two in Central Market yesterday.

Sue

jbucklin
07-09-2010, 01:37 PM
I'm not surprised. I bet Austin is brimming with them as well (no pun intended). Maybe life really is too short to live in Dallas! [huh]

Bustercat
07-09-2010, 03:57 PM
Because it's just a movie? :) (sorry, hadda say it.)
Indy is based on older adventure film characters, so it's a reference to older director's decisions, whether logical or not.

Aside from that, I think there's a couple of reasons... one, his nemesis was Belloq, who represented corrupt continental elitism and ironic decadence with his sparkling white lid, a reversal of the white hat/black hat roles of the classic westerns.
His hat is suited to drinking punch in the sun while others work for you.
Belloq can wear delicate, easily stained materials (and keep them as clean as he does) because he's protected at every turn by guys with machine guns, and never has to lift a shovel himself or break a sweat.

Indy's hat, on the other hand, is supposed to look more ovbiously like working hat, designed to take abuse. It's the hat of a man who makes his own way in the world, by his own means, and isn't afraid to get his hands dirty in the process.

Indy is an American icon like the Cowboys. Cowboys loved their beaver boss-of-the-plains hats in brutal heat and punishing storms, and paid top dollar for them. They were built to take a beating, keep the sun off the head, and withstand being rolled into a pillow, trampled by hooves, filled with water in a pinch, and being used as a campfire fan on prairie nights.
Can't ask the same of a panama straw, at least not for the same length of time...

Not saying there's anything wrong with panamas (i love em!)
But I can see why Spielberg and Lucas chose a dark felt for indy.

Unca Dusty
07-09-2010, 05:31 PM
I have hats similar to if not just like most of the ones that have been mentioned so far on this thread, so I decided to do a hot weather test on each of them.

I defer to you, Sir. You, at least, did some systematic comparison, which I did not (I just wore my pith for about 10 days in the desert and decided it sucked).

However, as you rightly pointed out, we must balance form with function, no? Or else I would wear my "yardwork" hat everywhere all summer: a peasant style, conical woven Korean bamboo fiber hat. A timeless classic in much of Asia because it works so well. Lightly varnished it makes a great rain hat, too.
However, it is strictly for gardening duties only. (Village Hat used to sell an rather inferior example of this hat which has since been discontinued).

Thanks for the test comparisons!
Unca

Woodfluter
07-15-2010, 01:30 AM
Jumping in here late, not having read every post in detail (contrary to my inclination...)

1. I don't find felts to be hotter than straws. It's more a matter of ventilation. A nice, open-weave cuenca is really cool! Lightweight felt is more versatile and less fragile.

2. On a very humid day, when not exposed to direct sunlight (radiation), I'm happier without any hat. Facts is facts.

3. If the sun is out, hats make me cooler unless the humidity is oppressive. In drier climates like out west, where I often go, hats are welcome on my head at any time.

4. Esp. when wearing felts...tipping the hat back, taking it off periodically all contribute to comfort in more humid weather. Keep moving it around.

5. Not sure how to explain this, but somehow my body gets acclimated to things I wear. I might be uncomfortable wearing a felt hat in some conditions at first, then after a day or two it's all different. Can't explain that. But suggest that you all not decide after a few hours - give it a few days before you decide what's more or less comfortable. YMMV.

6. Tilley hemp hats are very cool and versatile. Modern and high-tech. I know it's not everyone's cup of tea. Past month it's been Tilleys for me, plus Akubra Riverina with a lot of extra eyelets, and Banjo Paterson.

7. Hat comments...my experience echoes what was written. Used to get lots of comments, then the occasional "hey Indy!". But lately either nothing or a compliment. Yep, tide had turned. I see more folks wearing interesting hats.

- Bill

Mario
07-15-2010, 02:17 AM
Ah, but we have them in Fort Worth! Saw two in Central Market yesterday.

Sue

Sue! Now that's what I call a surprise! Nice to see you again! :)

John in Covina
07-15-2010, 08:54 AM
Here in LA the low temps for the season have been replaced with much hotter temps and in the valleys it's hitting at a little above 100F but the humidity has been a it higher than normal too. so it 's "sticky" for Southern California. I have been doing a variety of clean up and yard work, and the perspirations is just pouring out of me.

Got my old brown JC Pennys Marathon beater without liner on. At a certain point I realize my head is too hot and pop it off, snag my bandana and give my face and head a swipe. Let the evaporation do it's work for a bit and back on with the hat.

I need the sun protection as a pastey white Scandinavian descent white guy i get flash fried sunburn out this way really quickly. I did some yard work over by church and had a sunburn in under an hour, actually according to the tv there are days where i will get burned in about 5-10 minutes.

I had a tube of sun block in the truck but now it has vanished, doh!

Anyway at a certain point with the heat it doesn't seem to matter what type of hat, my straw or my felt, it's gonna be too warm.

danofarlington
07-15-2010, 09:11 AM
Jumping in here late, not having read every post in detail (contrary to my inclination...)
7. Hat comments...my experience echoes what was written. Used to get lots of comments, then the occasional "hey Indy!". But lately either nothing or a compliment. Yep, tide had turned. I see more folks wearing interesting hats.


I am seeing a few more hats too. Good hats by the pioneers will no doubt cause copying. The better the hat, the more the copying, the bigger the compliment. A really good hat should induce jealousy, lighting a fire under the arse of the observer, almost but not quite forcing him to approach you and blurt out "where did you get that hat?"

hatophile
07-16-2010, 10:40 AM
After wearing hats on a regular basis for about 4-5 years now, I am happy to say I have only gotten nice comments about them, and unbelievably no Indy comments. I do have a Chinese friend who calls me cowboy no matter what hat I wear (brimmed hat), but that's OK. I've had quite a few people ask where I've gotten my hats, and been happy to refer them to Akubra sites, Ebay, or custom hatters as they prefer.

Here in Northeast Ohio, it's been pretty hot the last few weeks, so I've been wearing more straws than fur. If it's a 70-75 degree day, or rainy, I'll pull out the fur felt. With less hair on the top, any cover would be appreciated!

Chasseur
07-16-2010, 11:26 AM
Aside from that, I think there's a couple of reasons... one, his nemesis was Belloq, who represented corrupt continental elitism and ironic decadence with his sparkling white lid, a reversal of the white hat/black hat roles of the classic westerns.
His hat is suited to drinking punch in the sun while others work for you.
Belloq can wear delicate, easily stained materials (and keep them as clean as he does) because he's protected at every turn by guys with machine guns, and never has to lift a shovel himself or break a sweat.

Indy's hat, on the other hand, is supposed to look more ovbiously like working hat, designed to take abuse. It's the hat of a man who makes his own way in the world, by his own means, and isn't afraid to get his hands dirty in the process.

Indy is an American icon like the Cowboys. Cowboys loved their beaver boss-of-the-plains hats in brutal heat and punishing storms, and paid top dollar for them. They were built to take a beating, keep the sun off the head, and withstand being rolled into a pillow, trampled by hooves, filled with water in a pinch, and being used as a campfire fan on prairie nights.
Can't ask the same of a panama straw, at least not for the same length of time...

Not saying there's anything wrong with panamas (i love em!)
But I can see why Spielberg and Lucas chose a dark felt for indy.

Bustercat, excellent analysis! :eusa_clap

AlterEgo
07-16-2010, 01:12 PM
I defer to you, Sir. You, at least, did some systematic comparison, which I did not (I just wore my pith for about 10 days in the desert and decided it sucked).

However, as you rightly pointed out, we must balance form with function, no? Or else I would wear my "yardwork" hat everywhere all summer: a peasant style, conical woven Korean bamboo fiber hat. A timeless classic in much of Asia because it works so well. Lightly varnished it makes a great rain hat, too.
However, it is strictly for gardening duties only. (Village Hat used to sell an rather inferior example of this hat which has since been discontinued).

Thanks for the test comparisons!
Unca

With a bit of achiness in my knee this morning, I decided to bike instead of power-walk, so off to the park I peddled. As soon as I got there I spotted a gal wearing one of those Asian cone hats like you describe. I veered over towards her to check out the hat more closely.

She was alone and really good-looking, so that gave me yet another reason to stop and introduce myself. Taking the hat off to let me inspect it more closely, I, in turn, handed my Akubra Hemp Range to her. Interestingly, our respective hats fit one another perfectly.

She said she got hers in China last year--some part of the country I'd never heard of well off the beaten tourist path. Woven of light-colored bamboo, it was really quite well made, obviously by hand with great care. Hard, lightly coated with some sort of shellac, and with a chin strap, it gleamed like a beetle and was very light in weight.

Getting along swimmingly, we took a walk together, wearing the others' hat. Now this was one time I did not walk at my usual break-neck speed, for obvious reasons. Even so, despite the 90-degree temps and stifling humidity, I'd rate it nearly as cool as my real cork pith helmet descibed above.

Better yet, I have a date with this smoking hot young babe tonight, and I wouldn't mind at all it she leaves the hat on!

danofarlington
07-16-2010, 01:13 PM
With a bit of achiness in my knee this morning, I decided to bike instead of power-walk, so off to the park I peddled. As soon as I got there I spotted a gal wearing one of those Asian cone hats like you describe. I veered over towards her to check out the hat more closely.

She was alone and really good-looking, so that gave me yet another reason to stop and introduce myself. Taking the hat off to let me inspect it more closely, I, in turn, handed my Akubra Hemp Range to her. Interestingly, our respective hats fit one another perfectly.

She said she got hers in China last year--some part of the country I'd never heard of well off the beaten tourist path. Woven of light-colored bamboo, it was really quite well made, obviously by hand with great care. Hard, lightly coated with some sort of shellac, and with a chin strap, it gleamed like a beetle and was very light in weight.

Getting along swimmingly, we took a walk together, wearing the others' hat. Now this was one time I did not walk at my usual break-neck speed, for obvious reasons. Even so, despite the 90-degree temps and stifling humidity, I'd rate it nearly as cool as my real cork pith helmet descibed above.

Better yet, I have a date with this smoking hot young babe tonight, and I wouldn't mind at all it she leaves the hat on!
Now, at some level, isn't that the real point of all this hat business? I say yes.

hatophile
07-16-2010, 01:25 PM
Alterego,

Now that's what I call cultural exchange!:eusa_clap

David Conwill
07-16-2010, 01:31 PM
one of those Asian cone hats like you describe.

Are we not allowed to refer to those as "Coolie hats" anymore?

Those hats, whatever they're called, are very popular in this area with migrant workers. Seems like every crew I see is outfitted with them - that or I only ever see the same crew in different fields.

-Dave

Neophyte
07-16-2010, 01:37 PM
AlterEgo, you're my hero!:D

Unca Dusty
07-16-2010, 01:52 PM
Are we not allowed to refer to those as "Coolie hats" anymore?

I would never tell you what you are "allowed" to say. I will say that "coolie" originally meant a manual laborer in Asia (usually the Far East). Like in a lot of places around the world, manual labor had a certain stigma attached to it, but it was still acceptable to refer to someone as a coolie (if they did that kind of work). The word itself, as currently used, has changed somewhat in connotation, though. "Coolie" is used now more as a racial slur. Places that sell these hats usually refer to them as "conical peasant hats."

Unca Dusty
07-16-2010, 02:12 PM
I tend to have the sweating problem in Summer and perspire equally whether I wear felt or straw. Since I began wearing my hair very very short I`ve discovered that urban invention called the "do rag" (or "wave rag"). Don`t laugh...yet. I find a plain colored one in a breathable material like cotton and affix the "rag" to my dome before doffing my lid and....ta-DAA! It works for me but I get some looks or rolling eyes sometimes. That`s ok because I like keeping my hats from getting sweat stains on them and....




...ok...it does make you feel just a bit gangsta,dawg! :eusa_doh:

HMH

Just like the classic way to wear a flat crowned sombrero cordobes (like what Zorro wears)! Only they used silk, I think. And don't make a mask out of the do-rag part.

Dewhurst
07-16-2010, 02:44 PM
5. Not sure how to explain this, but somehow my body gets acclimated to things I wear. I might be uncomfortable wearing a felt hat in some conditions at first, then after a day or two it's all different. Can't explain that. But suggest that you all not decide after a few hours - give it a few days before you decide what's more or less comfortable. YMMV.

Excellent point and exactly my experience as well. Never decide on limited experience or one off events. Always give things time, like wine, before deciding. This happens to me when listening to music. I may initially dislike or feel indifferent to something. Repeated listenings or future listenings and all of a sudden I like it.

Chasseur
07-16-2010, 02:48 PM
I actually wear a felt hat a fair bit in warm weather here in Hawaii and also other places when hiking in the summer. I use a felt hat almost exclusively when doing hunting here in Hawaii in 80+ degree weather. Also, if rain is expected I generally wear a felt hat.

I find, as some of the other posters have mentioned, that you do get used to it and I can wear felt pretty comfortablly into the 80s with mild humidity. I do find that if it gets above 90 and the humidity is high most of my felts do become much warmer than a straw hat.

David Conwill
07-16-2010, 03:55 PM
"Coolie" is used now more as a racial slur.

See that's what I was afraid of. English changed and left me behind. The Wikipedia article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coolie_hat) for "Conical Asian hat" indicates several names for this hat, including the Chinese "dǒu l" (bamboo hat) which I'm willing to bet was anglicized into "Coolie" and the widespread use of the dǒu l hat amongst Asian (particularly Chinese) laborers on U.S. railroads no doubt led to the workers themselves being labeled as Coolies.

The easiest term for me in the article may be "sedge hat", as it's more succinct and seems to have no cultural connotations.


Places that sell these hats usually refer to them as "conical peasant hats."

I love that "peasant" somehow isn't insulting.

-Dave

danofarlington
07-16-2010, 04:11 PM
I Also, if rain is expected I generally wear a felt hat.


OK, that gives me ammunition to wear a felt hat in summer.

Unca Dusty
07-16-2010, 07:22 PM
I love that "peasant" somehow isn't insulting.

Yeah, no kidding.

Blackthorn
07-16-2010, 08:04 PM
It finally got too hot for fur in the bay area. Ah well, it's only for a couple of months.

Dewhurst
07-17-2010, 12:22 AM
I do find that if it gets above 90 and the humidity is high most of my felts do become much warmer than a straw hat.

The heat index is what I always watch. When that puppy starts heading up I start dreading putting a hat on at all unless it is an incredibly flimsy flat cap or something.

HI of 105 yesterday. Nothing, I repeat, nothing is comfortable in temperatures that high. Going outside is a shame, really.

Chasseur
07-17-2010, 12:39 AM
Amen brother. My limit is about high 80s and high humidity for felt.

I do wear a Panama most days (say 3-4 days of the week), it is cooler all else being equal. But felt is just easier in terms of wear and tear, standing up to rain and just bashing it back into shape in case of emergencies. So I do wear felt on many warmish days.

Rain is what really gets me with Panamas... I'm thinking of picking up one of those Akuba Capricorns one day.

frussell
07-17-2010, 12:48 AM
We're getting up into 115 degree territory this time of year. In the old days, that wasn't so bad, you just put the black hat on the shelf and turn up the old "swamp cooler." Now, we've got so much agriculture and golf courses, added with the ever mysterious global warming, that we've got humidity in the desert. Anything over 15 percent humidity paired with 110 - 120 degrees is just plain nasty. I've been outside in this valley when it was 127 degrees. Having said that, I'm still wearing felts, just lighter-colored ones. With shorts. I'm a classy guy, but unless my trousers were made of cargo netting, it's too damn hot for long pants, and socks are like a form of torture right now. I'll save the photo image and let you picture a 285 pound, six foot five guy wearing a custom 100% beaver fedora in dove gray with some cargo shorts, Keen sandals and a classy "Big Belly Crew" t-shirt. Safe to say, I'm not setting any new fashion trends. Strangely enough, I also don't get any "hey there's Indiana Jones" remarks. Frank

cybergentleman
07-17-2010, 04:25 AM
I had learned about this in undergrad...that there are so many swimming pools and agriculture/watering spots now out west that it's no longer desert...and there are species of birds etc that are killing off the local wildlife..i think crows?

frussell
07-17-2010, 09:00 AM
I don't know about crows, but we have ravens out the wazoo.

cybergentleman
07-17-2010, 09:31 AM
yeah that could be them.

i just recall something about birds....ravens fit the bill. no pun intended

Mr. Paladin
07-17-2010, 10:17 PM
Based on the seemingly total absence of fur-felt fedoras here in Dallas (with the exception of mine)---regardless of the time of year---I guess I was starting to fancy myself a true pioneer.

I guess you and I have not bumped into each other...

Nice to meet you sir, I am quite near you and wear my felts generally all year 'round.

jbucklin
07-18-2010, 05:19 AM
So, you're in the Dallas area? I've read your posts, seen your pics and saw you were from N. Texas. It's comforting to know there's another one of us in this fedora-barren land. ;)

Do you ever go to Dallas Vintage in Plano? I've thought about visiting there to see what they have in the way of vintage hats but don't know anything about it. I've called them and asked and of course they have "lots of them" but I'm left wondering if their idea of a good hat is the same as mine.

Mr. Paladin
07-18-2010, 09:13 PM
So, you're in the Dallas area? I've read your posts, seen your pics and saw you were from N. Texas. It's comforting to know there's another one of us in this fedora-barren land. ;)

Do you ever go to Dallas Vintage in Plano? I've thought about visiting there to see what they have in the way of vintage hats but don't know anything about it. I've called them and asked and of course they have "lots of them" but I'm left wondering if their idea of a good hat is the same as mine.

I've been in to Dallas Vintage a couple of times. I asked the owner about hats and he asked to see mine, which was a Resistol Whippet clone, fingered it and said he had nothing like that. Since their move to Parker Rd. however, the store is much larger and may have better hats than the wool cheapies I found there. I'll check it out again soon and let you know.

Mav
07-18-2010, 09:51 PM
Tried an experiment while whipping around in a handicapped shuttle (golf cart) at the NHRA races at Sonoma this weekend. 2 1/2" brim straw fedora Friday, silverbelly Campdraft Sat. and Sun..
The felt wins. The straw is now relegated to gardening.

HosManHatter
07-21-2010, 03:15 PM
Over the past week to 10 days I`ve actually been wearing all three of my felt fedoras on a daily basis here in our Central-Northern California Summer heat and...

Despite my earlier comments and assumptions I`m finding very little,if any,difference between Felt and Straw fedoras with regard to how warm/hot they make me feel,how each material makes my head feel when worn in direct sunlight,the amount I sweat in either a straw or felt fedora(same) and how cool with regards to airflow(no real difference I can tell).

I was surprised as I always thought any felt hat would automatically be unbearable and stuffy in warm weather. Granted,I think that straw may be a bit more tolerant to heavy sweat than our felt friends though.

Perceptions and assumptions.Interesting.
HMH

Rick Blaine
07-21-2010, 03:25 PM
You Left Coasters need to come South & experience a real summer.

Relative humidity don't refer to when you & yer cousin was caught makin' out in the barn! [bad]

Hardly fit weather to have ANYTHING on your head, sure enough, fur felt? Fergit it! That dawg don't hunt.

Blackthorn
07-21-2010, 03:29 PM
I'm back to wearing fur felt again until the next heat wave. I love this climate.

thebroker
07-21-2010, 10:26 PM
Personally I switch between a couple of Stetson straws (a Retro and an OR) during the summer. I have several other straw hats, and while several of them are cooler than the Retro or OR because they vent better, they are a little too casual to go with a suit, which I wear most days.

Just for fun a few days ago, I tried out a felt hat to see how it went...I came home at lunch to switch back to straw because it was unbearable in the heat and humidity. However, I think the problem for me might be as much about color as anything. All my felt hats are dark, while all my straw hats are light, and we all know dark colors feel hotter when you wear them.

I have to say, there's just something stylish about a white hat with a black band paired up with a dark suit. Even if I didn't find straw hats to be more comfortable in the summer, I'd still wear them because they look good!

danofarlington
07-22-2010, 02:42 PM
However, I think the problem for me might be as much about color as anything. All my felt hats are dark, while all my straw hats are light, and we all know dark colors feel hotter when you wear them.


I agree with you. Dark colored felts also seem out of place to me in summer. It seems parallel to wearing flannel shirts in the summer--you could do it, but it's odd. I would change my mind if prevailing fashion dictated, like in the 30s and 40s, but you don't have that style going on now all over the place.

MattJH
07-26-2010, 09:07 AM
I cannot even begin to imagine the level of discomfort I'd endure wearing felt in the hot Philadelphia weather! Kudos to most of you. I can't do it. In fact, I can't even handle wearing straw in anything over 85 degrees Fahrenheit or so. And the sweatband must be elastic and absorbent. If it's leather, there's just no way at all. I haven't worn a hat since April or so, actually. I just wear sunscreen on my face/neck/shoulders and deal with it. Hats make an oven out of my head.

I'm actually confused about those stating that they feel cooler when wearing hats since they block out the sun. Either you're going through some kind of hat-lover's placebo, or your body chemistry is drastically different from mine. Heat escapes from your body in specific places, the crown of your head being one of them. Logic says that by covering that spot, you're retaining body heat. Regardless of whether you're blocking an external heat source (the sun), how do you feel cooler if you're blocking your internal heat from escaping? I don't get it.

theinterchange
07-26-2010, 11:53 AM
In my experiences with felt hats and heat, I've only found one hat that was impossible to wear in summer like conditions, a Penman rabbit. That sucker is HOT. My other felt hats, yes I get hot in them, but not overpoweringly so. I also have a good personal resistance to heat, it doesn't bother me all that much.

To me, it all boils down to personal makeup, some folks can take heat and wearing felt hats in it [or hats period], others can't.

I SHOULD buy a straw just for comparisons sake. It's been a good 10 years or so since I owned a straw, and it was a Stetson western.

Randy

theinterchange
07-26-2010, 11:54 AM
I agree with you. Dark colored felts also seem out of place to me in summer. It seems parallel to wearing flannel shirts in the summer--you could do it, but it's odd.

we're not in Seattle in the 1990's are we? :p

Randy

Woodfluter
07-27-2010, 12:12 AM
I cannot even begin to imagine the level of discomfort I'd endure wearing felt in the hot Philadelphia weather!


Hi Matt -

I used to live very near Philly, so I know what you mean about humidity. Now I'm in Atlanta, and it's been hot and humid - temp Monday in the 90's, humidity around 90%. Wore an Akubra Riverina today. Sounds crazy but it's really a "YMMV" thing. I do sweat profusely.



I'm actually confused about those stating that they feel cooler when wearing hats since they block out the sun.///
Heat escapes from your body in specific places, the crown of your head being one of them. Logic says that by covering that spot, you're retaining body heat. Regardless of whether you're blocking an external heat source (the sun), how do you feel cooler if you're blocking your internal heat from escaping? I don't get it.

It's all about heat transfer. Conduction we can neglect here, so it's radiation, convection, and (related to the latter) evaporation. In hot weather you want to reduce heat transfer into you from the environment, and promote loss of metabolic heat.

In direct sunlight you can absorb a good deal of heat directly from the sun. Yes, a hat might partially block heat loss due to evaporation (aided by air circulation) but still a net gain by eliminating direct absorption of radiant heat. Likewise, in sunlight you can be cooler wearing light clothing that blocks radiant heat but allows air circulation, as opposed to going naked.

Your skin temperature is around 91F normally, maybe up to 95 degrees in warmer weather. When it reaches your core temperature of 98.6 you begin to sweat. You also circulate more blood through vessels near the skin - sort of like a radiator. Especially on top of your head where there's a lot of surface with thin skin over bone.

Heat gets sucked out of your skin by the energy involved with a phase change from liquid water to vapor. Then air moves the vapor away along with heat near your skin - that's convection. Sounds great but...we're adapted for a sort of dry, hot environment.

When the humidity gets very high and there's little wind, this slick mechanism falls apart. That's what I find anyway. I sweat like crazy but all it does is make me wet and thirsty. I suspect that, on days like this Monday, wearing a felt hat (with lots of extra vent holes) works for me because I'm gaining less from evaporation anyway and radiation becomes more significant.

Out in the drier parts of the western US, evaporation is so efficient that wearing a hat makes little difference in heat loss - but helps a lot with blocking heat gain. For me anyway.

Also, physiology differs. People who live in certain environments change - including even the density of capillaries. So (just a guess) perhaps a person accustomed to wearing a hat channels more of the heat loss to other parts of the body, while an habitually hatless bloke works the head radiator harder? Dunno, but intriguing.

- Bill

Mr. Paladin
07-27-2010, 02:55 AM
It is hot in North Texas but I still like my felts, even in the summer. I note little difference unless the hat is black. I do avoid those in the summer.

MattJH
07-27-2010, 06:26 AM
Woodfluter/Bill - What a solid response! Thanks for that great big heap of human biology!

Yes, I did suspect that this sort of thing varies from person to person and from clime to clime. Me, I sweat when it's hot, and I won't stop until I've had adequate time to cool off in an air-conditioned environment. Still, after 30 seconds outside, the sweat will begin to drip off my nose again, quickly. The feel of fur covering my head and a leather strap wrapped around my forehead is enough to make me feel like I could pass out. It's not only uncomfortable, it's just downright not something I can do. So, as usual, my head will go naked until at least mid-September, if not October.

John in Covina
07-27-2010, 07:06 AM
When it's hot and the sun is beating down on you a hat shading your head area will help for a while. As described above once it is warm and your body is hot you'll sweat, at that point the hat keeps the heat in, so the key is to take off the hat regularly to allow evaporation and heat loss from the head.

Sometimes it helps to wipe with a bandana. If I get hot enough I'll visit the mens room to splash cold water on my face and neck also arms and wrists. In Las Vegas you often get those wet-naps a the casinos and the alcohol in the wipe helps with evaporation so they can be good to use too. An alcohol wipe can help with evaporation even in high humidity.

So frequent hat removal to evaporate is good but using a hat to keep the sun off is important for your skin.

B.J. Hedberg
07-27-2010, 10:04 PM
For me it seems just as hot if Im wearing a felt, a straw, or a baseball cap, regardless of the humidity I tend to sweat a lot so I usual wear felt if what Im doing involves yard work of some kind. Here is a photo from today. The temperature was about 93 degrees, with 54% humidity, and a dew point around 74; so I wore my oversized Stetson. If it gets too hot, I just run it under the outside spigot. Ive noticed that the horseflies tend to congregate on the top, instead of swarming the face as they do when Im in a baseball cap.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4124/4836883836_8f516b4dc7_m.jpg

Dewhurst
07-28-2010, 12:17 AM
Ive noticed that the horseflies tend to congregate on the top, instead of swarming the face as they do when Im in a baseball cap.

Very interesting.

Woodfluter
07-28-2010, 03:37 PM
Woodfluter/Bill - What a solid response! Thanks for that great big heap of human biology!


Hey Matt, I know this was over-geeky for a lounge conversation, but that's what happens when I write late at night! Thanks for the appreciation anyway. And you're right about differences - we each have surprisingly different reactions to heat or cold and we have to do what works for us individually.

I'd second what John in Covina said - removing the hat often and letting air circulate. I do that. Also, there's a current fashion of always wearing your hat pulled down firmly over the brows (as in my current avatar) but if you look at old-timey photos from warmer climes, you see lots of guys with hats tipped way back. Part might be mugging for the camera with a "hat halo" effect, but some that are more candid suggest something else I've found - tilt it back frequently and expose more of your head to the air. It works.

- Bill

sinatra66
09-17-2010, 02:07 PM
can you wear a felt in the summer? my thinking is a fella in the day would only buy a hat a year (unless your rich). the old hat would become the everyday hat, the new for the sunday best? could be wrong but i can't imagine my grandfather wearing straw. i only remember him in felts. asking because i'm new to hats and in love, yah i said it i'm bit.

zetwal
09-17-2010, 02:29 PM
Welcome to the Lounge! ;)

Of course you can wear felt in the summer. You just have to find the right hat for your purposes. This has been discussed in several threads. Some people can't (or don't like to) wear felt in the summer, others have no problem doing so. Do you know how to do a topic search? Such searches can come in handy as they allow you to see what's been said before (sometimes over several years) on many different topics. Again, welcome to the Lounge! :)

sinatra66
09-17-2010, 02:53 PM
thank you,
i hope to feel at home. by some of the pictures and threads i think i will be quite happy and well informed.
i did do a search. maybe not doing that right. i was just wondering because i'm getting into hats. like anything on the net, so many experts that don't actualy collect or wear. like a old thread was saying about charlie sheen/krammer shirts. that happened to me, buddy says oh you like 2 & 1/2 men. ????, i've been collecting & wearing open collar square bottom shirts for over 15 years.
but about the hats. i would like to do it like in the day. maybe not quite like some on here (amazing). but i always loved real 50's casual fashion. think it wouldn't be to hard to pull off with dedication and time.
again thank you,

sinatra66

Dewhurst
09-17-2010, 03:16 PM
Welcome, welcome!

Search around, this topic is beaten to death every few months and we all love sharing our thoughts and opinions (over and over and over again, either because hats never get boring or because we all love our own opinions just that much!). You'll have a lot of fun just going over what we and those before us have uttered.

A basic summary: felt in summer is all about comfort. If you can wear felt in the blazing sun and heat and humidity and don't feel like you're going to die, then wear it. If you wear it and lose 10% of your body weight through dispelled fluid within the space of 20 minutes, then you probably shouldn't.

If you only have the finances for a single hat and maybe a Sunday best kinda thing going on, then of course the choice becomes far more obvious and all of the advice in the world concerning straw hats and fabric hats and pitt helmets and whatnot become basically useless.

Enjoy your stay.

150719541
09-19-2010, 04:28 PM
The sunshine and the hot dont let use felt in summer.
:eusa_doh: :eusa_doh: :eusa_doh: