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Richard
05-04-2005, 09:00 PM
Is that an ok thing to do? I'd rather be ina dry hat than a soaking wet hat. Is there any reason not to scotchgard a hat? I noted that in the tilley instructions they say to scotchgard their hats every now and again

jamespowers
05-04-2005, 10:04 PM
Is that an ok thing to do? I'd rather be ina dry hat than a soaking wet hat. Is there any reason not to scotchgard a hat? I noted that in the tilley instructions they say to scotchgard their hats every now and again

I suppose it depends on the hat. Most all of my vintage hats will keep my head dry in the rain. These have not been scotchguarded. They just have a particular resistance to water.
Now your modern felts definitely need to be scotchguarded. They are like a collander. The felt is not tight and water resistant at all. This excludes custom made modern hats though. We are talking Stetsons, Borsalinos and other factory made hats.

Regards to all,

J

Dave Keith
05-05-2005, 08:31 AM
I agree with jamespowers that my vintage hats made of pure fur felt are impervious to rain. In addition, I must have gotten lucky, because my two Borsalinos of recent manufacture are equal in rain shedding quality.

Although I haven't just stood out in a downpour, both have been worn during fairly vigorous showers with protection on par with the vintage.

Based on my limited experience, I would not Scotchguard any of my fur felts unless they proved unworthy in a shower. The one wool felt hat that I own (and do not wear anymore) might be a candidate for treatment, however.

Dave

Mycroft
05-10-2005, 02:26 PM
This may be a bad source, but the women in Disney World who I bought my Indy wool "fedora," said to scotchguard it. I didn't and it went bad in the rain. Also, I thought scotchguard was illegal now?

Andykev
05-11-2005, 11:58 AM
The wool Indy fedora's need glue and stiffner in them to hold up in any wet situation.

Beaver or blended fur felt is naturally resistant to water, but not water proof.

Schotchguard by 3M is not illegal. I would NOT spray it on my hat however. I prefer the true hat stiffner products.

http://www.3m.com/us/home_leisure/scotchgard/app_diy_protector.jhtml

BellyTank
05-11-2005, 12:24 PM
They're supposed to have/or are phasing it out because it's really nasty ****e-

http://www.chemicalindustryarchives.org/dirtysecrets/scotchgard/1.asp

I had assumed the 'original' Scotchgard HAS been phased out and if the brand/product IS available, then it's surely a safer replacement compound.
We hope.

But it's been the coating on McDonalds' burger wrappers for many years- and many other places you never heard of-
-glad I don't eat McD's garbage food.

Keep it under your hat.

Michaelson
05-11-2005, 12:30 PM
In my area (Tennessee), the brown can Scotchgard for leather is pretty hard to find now. The green can and red can are still readily available. Regards. Michaelson

tonyb
01-11-2006, 09:46 PM
What's the learned opinion on applying ScotchGard to fur felts? Good? Bad? A bit of each? I've heard a salesperson at a hat retailer advise buyers of wool felts to use it. A staffer at this same store once told me that fur felts lose some water-repellency in the cleaning process, although I've yet to hear that confirmed elsewhere.

Raindog
01-11-2006, 10:25 PM
Akubra offer a Scotchguard protection on all their felts, so I think it must be Ok.
As to which scotchguard to use, I'll leave that to more informed members!:)


Jeff.

Bebop
01-11-2006, 10:53 PM
I have never used Scotchguard on a hat because it has never really worked that well on my sofa or any other object I have used it on. I use Scout Rain and Stain Repellent. It does work and I have never had a problem with it on a hat. I think alot of the better quality hats are pretty weather proof without adding anything to them.

Andykev
01-11-2006, 11:43 PM
When I lay my head down every night,
I say this prayer,
With all my might.

Don't spray Scotchguard upon your hat,
I pray you won't even think of that.

If you have a felt that is very good,
Then it should shed water, is that understood?

Putting on the felt such chemical spray,
Will wreck the fibers, need more I say?

If you plan on being in a downpour of rain,
A plastic protector is the name of the game.

besdor
01-12-2006, 05:38 AM
NO NO NO !! Please No !!! Unless you want the hat to feel and look like sandpaper . Scotchguard is good for wool only ,not fur felt.:cool2:

varga49
01-12-2006, 06:38 AM
When I lay my head down every night,
I say this prayer,
With all my might.

Don't spray Scotchguard upon your hat,
I pray you won't even think of that.

If you have a felt that is very good,
Then it should shed water, is that understood?

Putting on the felt such chemical spray,
Will wreck the fibers, need more I say?

If you plan on being in a downpour of rain,
A plastic protector is the name of the game.
Wow! Nice little informative ditty!...Did you just come up with that? I've never had any luck with scotchguard on automobile seats, clothing, furniture, etc! I'd never put scotch guard on any of my hats!

SHARPETOYS
01-12-2006, 08:12 AM
I have talked to several hatters on this stuff they said never use it and its hard to get out when you need your fedora cleaned. :)

Uncle Vern
01-12-2006, 08:12 AM
If you Google around the net enough, you'll find that a few years ago, 3M quietly began tinkering wih the ingredients of Scotchgard--something to to with carcinogens. That doesn't surprise me. Armor-all belongs in that category--you can see the film it exudes all over the inside of your windshield, and it's probably inside your lungs.
Just the idea of of blasting a nice felt fur hat with Scotchgard seems like a spooky thing to do. I bought an old Open Road on eBay that had been Scotchgarded. The brim felt like cardboard. Repeated steamings, brushings and manipulations eventually loosened the hat up, but the felt still doesn't look or feel exactly right, and it probably never will.
When I first got interested in hats, I was fixated on the look of them, so I took the phrase "a good John B. Stetson" to mean that it was a nice-looking lid. It took me a while to realize that what that phrase really meant was that it was a fully functional felt working tool--water repellent, and even when saturated, capable of absorbing a ton of water without leaking into the wearer's face. And the hat doesn't necessarilly have to be pure beaver--I have an old rabbit fur cowboy hat that does its job admirably, but then, they made better felt 50 years ago. Scotchgarding a good hat is redundant--it's already waterproof. If it's not, you've got a lousy hat.

fedoralover
01-12-2006, 12:00 PM
I've heard of people doing it and saying it didn't hurt anything, but when I did it, it definitely changed the feel of the felt. I never do it anymore. The felt will dry out and it won't hurt anything, unless it's a newer felt and you stay out in the rain for hours. But then you should be wearing something else anyway.

fedoralover

Kaleponi Craig
01-12-2006, 03:19 PM
I've used "Scout Felt Hat Rain and Stain Protector" on my Adventurebilt a couple of times, to no ill effect. Maybe this is different, as it is just for felt hats. But reading your comments, I may not use it again...KC

Biltmore Bob
01-12-2006, 03:29 PM
. Scotchgarding a good hat is redundant--it's already waterproof. If it's not, you've got a lousy hat.

...my feelings exactly! Far as I'm concerned, felt was made to be rained on.

jake_fink
01-12-2006, 06:44 PM
Andykev said:
When I lay my head down every night,
I say this prayer,
With all my might.

Don't spray Scotchguard upon your hat,
I pray you won't even think of that.

If you have a felt that is very good,
Then it should shed water, is that understood?

Putting on the felt such chemical spray,
Will wreck the fibers, need more I say?

If you plan on being in a downpour of rain,
A plastic protector is the name of the game.

I've been humming this to myself all day. :cheers1:

Mycroft
01-12-2006, 09:22 PM
When I lay my head down every night,
I say this prayer,
With all my might.

Don't spray Scotchguard upon your hat,
I pray you won't even think of that.

If you have a felt that is very good,
Then it should shed water, is that understood?

Putting on the felt such chemical spray,
Will wreck the fibers, need more I say?

If you plan on being in a downpour of rain,
A plastic protector is the name of the game.

Wow, do you do toasts and birthday parties, Mr. Poet who we did not know it? Anyhow, how good is good felt fur?

Ray-Vigo
11-13-2008, 11:40 PM
Is it wise to Scotchguard wool felt? What about fur felt? I have several hats of each material and have read that you can Scotchguard a hat to help keep out rain. Does the Soctchguard damage or alter the hat (shrink it, distort it, bleed it etc) in any way? I'd like to do what I can to rain proof my hats (I use an umbrella but it isn't 100% dry when walking to work), but don't want to damage them by trying to apply Scotchguard. If you can do this, what variety of Scotchguard works best and what is the best way to apply it? I'm guessing it's some kind of a spray-on process.

Subvet642
11-14-2008, 06:36 AM
Ray,

I'm new too, but check out this link. Click on "Hat Care Products", and you should find what you're looking for.

http://www.menshats.com/category/dress-hats/1

All the best.

Akubra Man
11-14-2008, 07:07 AM
I think that any waterproofing is unneeded for a fur felt hat. I have worn all my hats in snow and rain and never had an issue with them getting wet. They shed water fine and when wet dry out fine. :)

HarpPlayerGene
11-14-2008, 08:18 AM
I've used Scotchguard (sp?) and similar camping waterproofer sprays on wool hats in the past. Didn't hurt mine any. Might have helped.

But I wouldn't spray any of this on my fur felt hats. Best to let them do their job as designed. Akubra Man sums up my experience in this area.

Rick Blaine
11-14-2008, 08:32 AM
At one time hatsdirect offered Scotchguard as an option. David Morgan's website too recomends periodic treatment. I have used a variety of products (Scotchguard, Campdry) on fur felts w/o ill effect... my .o2.

duggap
11-14-2008, 08:35 AM
If I am not mistaken, I believe Art F. uses some water proofing on his custom beavers before he ships them out. Hope I am not putting words in Art's mouth.[huh]

airspirit
11-17-2008, 07:15 PM
I used the "fabric" labeled scotchgard on my new hat. I would spray it down nice and damp then let it go touch dry (2 hours or so), lightly brush it with a hat brush to take off the speckles from the spray, then reapply. I did it five times, and by the time I was done you wouldn't know by look that it was applied. One caveat: make sure your pins and whatnot are off your hat, since scotchgard can eat through non-colorsafe dyes and it would be horrible to forget a feather or pin and permanently stain your felt.

Ray-Vigo
11-18-2008, 12:09 PM
I've Scotchguarded my wool felt hats. Those are the ones I wear when the rain is the worst. I've left the fur felt hats alone.

NonEntity
11-18-2008, 09:28 PM
I've used ScotchGuard for years on everything from the carpet in my cars to, yes, headgear.

First off, today's environmentally friendly SG does not work as well as the old kind that punched holes in the ozone. I'm sure of this because I recently found an ancient can among the paint in the basement and compared it with a new can in the for-fabric version on two identical leather-billed corduroy ball caps that are practically new.

There may be other changes in the formula, but the propellant in the old stuff aerated it into a finer mist, forced it out with more thrust, and gave me a little buzz, as well. As a result, one application of it rendered the cap utterly waterproof when I put it on and poured a bucket of water over my head. I was pleased with the outcome, or perhaps just slap-happy from inadvertently inhaling the fumes.

In contrast, after one application of the new stuff, the valleys between some of the cord wales became slightly damp. Having seen me dunk a second bucket of water over my head while wearing a poncho with bare legs sticking out on a bright sunny day, an elderly woman walking by with her dog visibly picked up her pace. Her English bull, on the other hand, gazed at me with a rather understanding look.

I let that hat dry out, put on another light application, allowed it to dry, then sprayed on a third and final application. It's now almost as waterproof as the hat with the old stuff on it, but not quite, and with a lot more effort.

One thing I've noticed in using the new stuff on all manner of materials is that it changes the "hand" of it--gives it a coarser texture and stiffens it. This is especially conspicuous when you try to get by with once heavy application, which after it dries will necessitate a vigorous brushing off of the white residue and not make it any more waterproof than two or three light coats that leave no residue.

SG does not seem to affect the breathability of things I've put it on, so that would be no reason to not use it.

In sum, if you heed the caveats mentioned previously, ScotchGuard will render most things almost waterproof and not damage anything that's colorfast, but will alter it's feel at least somewhat. For that reason, I would not hesitate to put it on a wool beret, some of which come "impermeable" brand new, any canvas or wool felt hat, or even a rugged fur felt if I intended to trek in it across the rain-soaked montane forests of Borneo. After all, I'd want my head to be perfectly dry should the headhunters there take a liking to my cranium--it's a die-with-clean-underwear thing type of thing, don't ya know.

But a vintage hat of any kind or a finer fur felt, be it custom-made or off-the-shelf, I would not put anything but the bristles of my brim brush on.

Now, where'd I hide that old can of ScotchGuard? I could use a stiff sniff!

airspirit
11-19-2008, 06:52 PM
That's a good point: it does change the feel of the felt slightly. It also seemed to make my brim a little snappier, but that might also be my imagination at work.

airspirit
11-20-2008, 01:30 PM
I got caught in the rain for the first time today after treating my hat like described above. When I got inside I removed the hat (had been out in heavy rain about 3-4 minutes) to find that all the water had beaded up on it like on a freshly waxed car. I turned it upside down, gave it a shake, and almost all the water came off. Less than five minutes later the hat was perfectly dry. I don't know if that will help anyone or not, but thought I'd throw it out there.

Ray-Vigo
11-20-2008, 01:42 PM
I gave my foul weather litefelt hat a heavy duty treatment with Scotchguard-- multiple layers over the course of two evenings. There was no shrinking or color problems. The hat has become a bit "stiffer" than it was, but it is still quite crushable and soft on the whole. I haven't worn it out in the rain yet though.

Preacher Man
01-17-2009, 10:05 AM
I did a search and couldn't find anything on the subject; if I'm repeating, I'm sorry - please forgive. Here's my question: have any of you treated your hat with Scotch Guard to repel water? Would it have a negative effect on the felt? If you have used it, what were the results? Just wondering. Thanks to you all.

Preacher Man
Philippians 4:13

jpbales
01-17-2009, 10:13 AM
a lot of people use scotch guard on their hats (and there has been a previous thread about this, but I know how hard it is to find old posts around here;) ) From my use of it, and what I've heard, it doesn't have any negative effects on the hat (except it's not supposed to be used on leather, so keep it away from the sweatband). If you're worried about waterproofing your hat, you shouldn't have to worry too much if it's felt anyway. The scotch guard should help keep stains away if you dirty up your hat though. I've scotched my hats but I've never had a problem with waterproofing anyway, and I haven't yet had the chance to try and stain my hat either.:p
Welcome to the lounge,
Jimmy

bd3
01-17-2009, 10:34 AM
I've not had my hat very long but I used Camp Dry on it in an effort to promote water repelling. If you do try the Camp Dry route, I tried it on a hidden area of the hat to make sure it wouldn't change the color or make it look blotchy. On my hat it didn't change the color much, if any, so I put on 2 good coats letting it dry well between coats.

Matt Deckard
01-17-2009, 11:48 AM
The Scotch Guiard will soak in though from past experience so will the water. I mentioned it in the Felt hat basics thread.
http://www.thefedoralounge.com/showthread.php?t=6981

Felt works just like a sponge, and unless you cover it in something water tight, nothing will keep the water from soaking into the felt. I keep my felts product free now. Depending on the quality of the felt it's okay to let it soak through. Better hats will droop less with rainfall after rainfall. Anywho... check out that thread for more info on how water effects hats.

Bob Smalser
01-17-2009, 12:22 PM
None of that silicone stuff works for very long anyway. Working outdoors all day in a miserable, driving rain is why God gave us tin hoods. ;)

http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3389779/351547963.jpg

http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3389779/351548224.jpg

D.W. Suratt
01-17-2009, 03:43 PM
I used it on both my wool hats, one fur felt hat, and my new cap. It may not make it waterproof, but on the wools I'd rather be safe than sorry. It hasn't hurt any of them.

jmclfrsh
12-15-2014, 04:05 AM
I recently purchased three new Akubras. I know they are waterproofed while being made, but is it a good idea (or a bad one) to lightly spray with Scotchguard as well, as an additional measure against rain and oil spotting from handling?

One for sure will be worn in the rain with a new rain suit. I do know not to spray the underside so steaming can still be accomplished.

Thanks!

gtdean48
12-15-2014, 07:55 AM
I recently purchased three new Akubras. I know they are waterproofed while being made, but is it a good idea (or a bad one) to lightly spray with Scotchguard as well, as an additional measure against rain and oil spotting from handling?

One for sure will be worn in the rain with a new rain suit. I do know not to spray the underside so steaming can still be accomplished.

Thanks!

I've never treated an Akubra or other fur felt hat with Scotchguard. I have done many wool crushers.

jmclfrsh
12-15-2014, 04:56 PM
Thank you Sir. My post was moved to this thread after I posted it, and after reading this thread in its entirety, and your response just now, I'm sure glad I left them alone!

I did get rain protectors, one for each hat, and I'll take one with me when I take them camping so if I know it's gonna be a long day in them while raining at least they'll have some protection. But for brief showers or snow, sounds like I'm good the way they came from Akubra.