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View Full Version : What do you guys use or recommend to apply Pecard's leather dressing...
















holdemchamp1225
01-17-2009, 03:36 PM
I know different people use different techniques or maybe even objects/devices to apply. Just wanted some good advice and which results turned out best. Thanks in advance.

blacklagoon
01-17-2009, 04:13 PM
I use the index finger mostly to apply pecard to my jackets.after a few hours,i start to interchange between my index finger and my middle finger.I only use the tips.It takes me approximately 6 hours to thoroughly apply it using the two finger tips.

Baron Kurtz
01-17-2009, 05:03 PM
Fingers are the only way i've found to reliably, evenly, work the stuff into the leather to my satisfaction.

bk

feltfan
01-17-2009, 11:01 PM
I used fingers, too.

And you should see my fingers now! Beautiful grain and no
need to reapply Pecard's for years! ;)

holdemchamp1225
01-18-2009, 12:09 AM
techniques or devices to help with the application. I know that after the initial application there needs to be time to allow for drying in the case one needs to apply a second layer BUT does it REALLY take 6 hours to apply to one jacket? If so, then I accept that but was just thinking that 6 hours is quite a long time!! ;)

By the way, thanks to everyone for their responses and recommendations. Looking forward to hearing if there are other methods.

Cheers,

Bruce


I use the index finger mostly to apply pecard to my jackets.after a few hours,i start to interchange between my index finger and my middle finger.I only use the tips.It takes me approximately 6 hours to thoroughly apply it using the two finger tips.

rgraham
01-18-2009, 01:02 AM
I just used some stuff called "Leather Therapy". I applied it with a small piece of sponge, and it took maybe half an hour to forty five minutes to do a 3/4 length coat. http://www.leathertherapy.com/

I used it on an old military leather coat that I recently purchased. It arrived as stiff as cardboard, and fairly wrinkled. The next day it had penetrated the leather, and was becoming quite soft. A few days later, it was wearable. I may put one more coat on to see what happens.

I was told by a man that makes A-2 jackets, that he uses Vaseline to bring older jackets back to life. He says it's PH neutral, and works very well. I'm not sure how many fingers he uses while applying it however.;)

aswatland
01-18-2009, 04:48 AM
I only apply Pecards with my fingers. It also helps to keep my skin supple!;)

scotrace
01-18-2009, 06:14 AM
I only apply Pecards with my fingers. It also helps to keep my skin supple!;)


The added benefit! (seriously)

I get my whole hand(s) gooped with it and just keep massaging it in.

Bruce Wayne
01-19-2009, 12:00 AM
i use my fingers inside an old cotton sock. also, like it was said above, you need to let it soak in for at least six hours. i usually let it soak in over night.
thanx!!!
charlie

TM
01-19-2009, 09:47 AM
But which Pecard product? They seem to have a wide selection:

http://www.pecard.com/

Thanks!

Tony

blacklagoon
01-19-2009, 10:07 AM
I use the antique leather care for my original irvin jackets and trousers.

holdemchamp1225
01-19-2009, 11:54 AM
Was curious to know since this would be my first endeavor into treating my own jackets as to how much of the Pecards leather dressing I should use per jacket? Should I just goop it on in generous amounts and rub the excess off? I am about to order more of the dressing since I have multiple jackets and just wanted to know what you guys thought.

On another note, do any of you guys use the classic leather dressing for ALL types of hides and jackets or is it better to switch among the leather dressings offered from Pecards such as their antique dressing, classic dressing, dressing for motorcycle jackets, specialty creams, lotions, etc...?

Thanks in advance.

Cheers,

Bruce

blacklagoon
01-19-2009, 01:33 PM
I really do not know about the other leather dressings.I just went by what they said about the antique one,and bought that.
I did try putting a big lump of antique leather dressing on my first original irvin jacket when i got it,but found it was like kneeding dough when making bread.It took much longer to spread and eventually rub it in properly.that is why i settled for the quicker,more efficient method of only using my index finger.I simply find my index finger has more concentrated power in it when rubbing in circles,and is much faster all round.
Another thing about pecard,is that it may help eleviate any unpleasant smells that the leather itself has got.I used it on an old irvin that absolutely reeked abominably,and pecard totally destroyed the bad odour.

holdemchamp1225
01-19-2009, 01:53 PM
I have corresponded with Eric from Pecard and this is his exact quote to me:

"Youíre in luck since the Antique and Classic Dressings are the same formulation. They are just labeled for different markets. Also, the 32oz sized container goes a looonnnggg way when applied correctly. I would use the dressing over the creams in your application since you arenít trying to soften really stiff leather. The extra waxes in the dressing is also a plus for protection of the fibers. The application is simpleÖ.just take a clean cloth and wipe on the dressing in a very thin layer. Let the leather soak up as much as it needs over night and then buff off any excess that is still on the surface. The buffing friction will melt the waxes to the surface. Thatís it!"

Hope that helps any others who have been confused or are contemplating on which Pecard product to use. ;)

Cheers,

Bruce


I really do not know about the other leather dressings.I just went by what they said about the antique one,and bought that.
I did try putting a big lump of antique leather dressing on my first original irvin jacket when i got it,but found it was like kneeding dough when making bread.It took much longer to spread and eventually rub it in properly.that is why i settled for the quicker,more efficient method of only using my index finger.I simply find my index finger has more concentrated power in it when rubbing in circles,and is much faster all round.
Another thing about pecard,is that it may help eleviate any unpleasant smells that the leather itself has got.I used it on an old irvin that absolutely reeked abominably,and pecard totally destroyed the bad odour.

Bruce Wayne
01-19-2009, 03:49 PM
youshouldnt need to applyit to a new jacket, fyi...

icecold
01-28-2009, 09:10 PM
Now, obviously pecard seems to be a good product, and I plan to use it in my jackets. The question is when? and how often?
All my jackets are new Aero FQHH. So, I'm curious, what is the general consensus, if any, on the recommended frequency of treatments post-purchase. THanks.

H.Johnson
01-29-2009, 09:30 AM
I don't believe this thread...

scotrace
01-29-2009, 09:59 AM
Now, obviously pecard seems to be a good product, and I plan to use it in my jackets. The question is when? and how often?
All my jackets are new Aero FQHH. So, I'm curious, what is the general consensus, if any, on the recommended frequency of treatments post-purchase. THanks.


Wear them often, hang them on the closet floor or in the trunk (boot) of the car, bunch them up for a seat cushion, etc., for a few years. Then break out the Pecard's if it seems to be dry in spots or you want to hide some of the scratches. Go lightly even then. And maybe once a year or two after.

johnnyjohnny
01-29-2009, 09:50 PM
a gaSoline nozzle.

ok, sorry for that heresy as pecard's is sorely loved on this forum, i know.

however, one contradiction no one has ever explained to me is that oil/petroleum products, or conditioners having petrol products in them, are recommended by nearly aLL leather care specialists NOT to be used on leather as a conditioner, such as on leather jackets

pecard's haS petroleum products in it

oh well, one of the mysteries of LiFe

Baron Kurtz
01-30-2009, 01:52 AM
however, one contradiction no one has ever explained to me is that oil/petroleum products, or conditioners having petrol products in them, are recommended by nearly aLL leather care specialists NOT to be used on leather as a conditioner, such as on leather jackets



You'll notice that they're rather vague and wishy-washy about exactly why petroleum products are "bad" for leather. Let them produce some evidence for us to assess (not simply: "believe me, i know what i'm talking about"), and we'll begin to start believing the hype. The whole thing smacks of Old Wives Tale, to me.

And, no, new jackets shouldn't need to be conditioned. If you buy a new jacket that does need conditioner, send it back.

bk

johnnyjohnny
01-30-2009, 03:54 PM
actually, it was on several of the 'how to take care of leather' websites, that admittedly share a lot of the same info, repeating it...but the statement was that petroleum products will, over time, begin to have a deteriorating effect on leather, breaking down the fibers...whereas natural conditioners, such as lanolin, will not do this

whether that's true or not, one must ask an old wife

OneEyeMan
03-17-2009, 03:55 AM
I don't know what all the fuss is about.
I've been using http://www.obenaufs.com/lp.php?osCsid=ca78764935d2b059aa7dfceba55f2614 Obenauf's for years on all my leather stuff (shoes, jackets, bags) and it works nicely. No petroleum products in it either. Warm up the leather slightly with a hair dryer while working the stuff in with your fingers.
Apply as much as the leather can take.
When it stops sinking in, stop applying it.
Let it dry, wipe off the excess.
It's not rocket science guys!
Lenny

Castor Dioscuri
01-19-2010, 07:52 PM
actually, it was on several of the 'how to take care of leather' websites, that admittedly share a lot of the same info, repeating it...but the statement was that petroleum products will, over time, begin to have a deteriorating effect on leather, breaking down the fibers...whereas natural conditioners, such as lanolin, will not do this

whether that's true or not, one must ask an old wife

Johnnyjohnny, I'm really curious about your thoughts on Obenaufs. I've been using Pecards for the last three years on my jackets, but lately I've wanted to apply some conditioner to a leather sofa that I consider a sort of family heirloom. As such, I've become paranoid and wanted to do as much research as I could on Pecard to make sure it was the right choice... I didn't want to be the one that destroyed the sofa.

Your post in this thread led me down my research path, and after reading what you said, I did as much research as I could about petroleum and leather. Petroleum, being a key ingredient in Pecard, turned out to be a double edged sword. From my research, I discovered that while it softens leather, Petroleum does so by breaking down the leather fibers... Obviously not something I want happen to an antique sofa.

I did send Pecard an email to ask them what their thoughts were on this, but never got a response.

So I'm leaning towards Obenaufs, which seems to have much of the same ingredients, with the exception of petroleum. However, I'm still not sure about Obenaufs, except for a few biased reviews (like the ones for Pecards), but nothing really conclusive.

As you were the one that began these questions for me, Johnnyjohnny, I thought you'd be the best person to ask!

Edward
03-06-2013, 06:19 AM
I've just ordered my first tub of Pecards - I have a well-broken in ELC A2 and a motorcycle jacket that are a touch dry on and a bit scratched. Does Pecards restore colour, or will I need to look at a colouring agent of some sort for these jackets after Pecards? Another thing... how often do you folks reapply? The site I'm buying from suggests every 4-8 months, depending on climate, but that seems a bit much to me (they are trying to sell me more of the stuff, I think...)?

Joel Shapiro
03-06-2013, 06:49 AM
Obenaufs won a scientific study conducted by the University of Cincinnati, and out of all conditioners tested, they came out on top in 8 of 9 categories. Don't know if Pecards was one of the others tested, but I'd be surprised if it wasn't. You can read about it here:

https://www.obenaufs.com/index.php?route=information/information&information_id=8

Obenaufs sells conditioner specific to furniture.

https://www.obenaufs.com/index.php?route=information/information&information_id=32

ButteMT61
03-06-2013, 07:49 AM
I've just ordered my first tub of Pecards - I have a well-broken in ELC A2 and a motorcycle jacket that are a touch dry on and a bit scratched. Does Pecards restore colour, or will I need to look at a colouring agent of some sort for these jackets after Pecards? Another thing... how often do you folks reapply? The site I'm buying from suggests every 4-8 months, depending on climate, but that seems a bit much to me (they are trying to sell me more of the stuff, I think...)? Pecards make many different treatments. But, generally speaking, treatments won't restore color - but it will most likely darken what you put it on, at least temporarily.Don't go crazy. I use my bare hands to put it on after I let the tub sit in the sun to warm it up (you could put in a pot of hot water if you get no sun lol ) Do one coat and (after you test it somewhere) let it sit a day. IF it looks like it needs more, go for it. Just don't soak the leather down with too much treatment. It will be regretted later. You don't want it to weigh 2x what it does now, and you don't want it to be greasy after it soaks in.Once done, depending on the hide, you can buff with an old sock or T-shirt.

gtdean48
03-06-2013, 08:14 AM
I've used Leather-Mate/Urad Black to good results on black boots.
Need to use gloves to apply because it did stain my fingers.
http://www.urad.com/DetailsListEng.cfm?ID=1
http://www.urad.com/support/FAQleathermate.cfm

rocketeer
03-07-2013, 02:23 AM
Another Pecards thread eh haha. Never used it myself but on my WWII era A2(Lucy 7 Seven) I have used Ko Cho Line for 30 years, but we digress.
I imagine it's a similar product and to apply I just have a rough weave rag that I have been using the same 30 years and just rub the jacket all over. Dont douse the jacket in the stuff or it will remain 'greasy' for a long time. I would think no more[amount] than you would use if applying shoe polish to a pair of boots, or even shoes.
One make I have always steered clear of is Connelly Hide Food, a cream coloured waxy conditioner for car seats etc. i rubbed that one on a jacket once and after a couple of days it left a white residue behind, maybe I used a little too much but I would not use it again. Not on a jacket anyway.
Johnny Tee

Joel Shapiro
03-07-2013, 07:40 AM
I second Butte's suggestion to use your bare fingers. Not only does it work easier/faster than a cloth, but the heat from your fingers helps melt the wax and apply more evenly. Also, it doesn't cause dye transfer onto your fingers the way it can with a cloth.

rocketeer
03-07-2013, 09:08 AM
I second Butte's suggestion to use your bare fingers. Not only does it work easier/faster than a cloth, but the heat from your fingers helps melt the wax and apply more evenly. Also, it doesn't cause dye transfer onto your fingers the way it can with a cloth.
As I pointed out I have been doing it for 30 years:), with no ill effects or dye transfer from or too the rag. What colour is Pecards conditioner anyway.
Another question or two, 1/ how long have Pecards been in buisness selling saddlery products(well it comes under that type of thing doesnt it)? 2/ has anyone else been conditioning jackets around as long as I have and what products do they use?
J

PS. Not trying to be self gratifying with the above, just would like to compare methods so others may gain from our experiences:)

ButteMT61
03-07-2013, 09:22 AM
As I pointed out I have been doing it for 30 years:), with no ill effects or dye transfer from or too the rag. What colour is Pecards conditioner anyway.Another question or two, 1/ how long have Pecards been in buisness selling saddlery products(well it comes under that type of thing doesnt it)? 2/ has anyone else been conditioning jackets around as long as I have and what products do they use?JPS. Not trying to be self gratifying with the above, just would like to compare methods so others may gain from our experiences:) Seriously? Every time someone mentions Pecards, you feel the need to post this holier than thou retort. Enough already. Use what you like, but quit challenging others if you don't mind? It gets old...

rocketeer
03-07-2013, 10:52 AM
I doubt I will change anyones mind about the product they use, I just think there are just as good products as Pecards and a lot cheaper as well. I have not seen Pecards in my local saddlery shop, but at air shows and places where they sell that sort of thing such as aviation magazines, a small tin(6oz?) retails a touch below £10 + postage, where as the product I use retails about £6 for slightly larger tin off the shelf.
It seems as soon as someone posts about conditioning leather, Pecards name pops up and like other posters I like to let people know there are other products out there just as good and cheaper.
Maybe reading through it does sound a bit 'I've had my jacket longer than you' type of thing but was not meant like that. There a people out there who have been collecting much longer than me, though I dont know any collectors personally anymore as I no longer collect them myself, and would like to know what they have been using.

Done a bit of research: Pecards have been in business since 1902.
Why do some leather companies sell these products(all manufacturers) to use on new jackets when it is really meant for the older stuff? Very prevalent at airshows over here.
Thats all from me, J.

Capesofwrath
03-07-2013, 11:11 AM
Since you mention Hide Food I've been using that for a very long time. I started when I had Jaguars and did the seats every couple of months or so. Connolly's have gone the way of all flesh now but another company still makes Hide Food to the same formula.

They were famous for supplying the leather for Roll Royce car seats and used to have a depot near the West End where they Connollised older RR seats to bring them back to as new. I use it on my jackets too and it is good stuff. It doesn't waterproof but it softens and conditions. The secret is to be sparing otherwise you will get a white residue in the stitching which has to be brushed out when dry. It tells you to use only a small amount on the label.

ButteMT61
03-07-2013, 11:14 AM
There's no problem talking about other products - that's good for everyone. I have no allegiance to Pecards other than I use it and it works. Same for Sno*Seal on my hiking boots. It's the (interpreted) condescending replies you always post in retort to a Pecards post. People have used lots of crap for 100+ years that isn't good for leather and still is sold today. See this page for items that people use that ruin leather, but still get recommended.

http://www.huntingnet.com/articles/article_detail.aspx?articles_id=560

How long someone has been around isn't necessarily a measure of it being the right thing to use/do. I have been treating leather boots and gear for 40 years - my Dad was a geologist and we spent most of our days in the wilderness and it was important to learn the tricks. I don't spout my 40 years of experience to argue with someone over a product that is good, approved by many makers, and works.

Most people - even me - have used conditioners on new leather. For me, that was a carryover from my boot/gear days and it turns out to be not the best thing for new jackets. Why do they sell it? Because people buy it :)

P5640blouson
03-07-2013, 11:46 AM
lanolin based Lexol cleaner is best as it won't change the complexion of the leather surface, is pH neutral. Problem is that you should clean and apply often as it evaporates quicker than leather dressings. for more lasting effect but complexion change, Lexol conditioner for heavy analine/semi pigmented hides, 303 for fully pigment finish hides, or mix 303 in the lexol for semi analine hides to enable UV protection. Leather Therapy is amazing at softening leather and preventing permanent rotting mold/mildew for those in damp climates, but it costs a little more as well and soften more than you like, for those who live for fighting their stiff jackets. Or do nothing and have your's looking like "beaten by California sun" as I've read somewhere.

frussell
03-07-2013, 11:59 AM
One trick I've always used, whether with Pecard's or R.M. Williams Saddle Dressing (my personal favorite, seems to last a little longer) is to try to warm up the leather rather than the dressing. I live where there's lots of sun, so it's easier for me than some. I leave the boots or saddle or jacket out in the sun for long enough for it to get warm, then apply with a clean sock, turned inside out so the nappy side is outside. I don't leave it out in the sun with the dressing on for too long, as that will cause over-penetration. Usually I will let the item soak it up in the shade, then wipe off the excess, especiallly around the threads. Works like a charm. I like Pecards, but for saddles and boots and tack, it seems to need re-treatment more often than the Williams, and in my opinion, is less useful for waterproofing. Frank

ButteMT61
03-07-2013, 12:01 PM
One trick I've always used, whether with Pecard's or R.M. Williams Saddle Dressing (my personal favorite, seems to last a little longer) is to try to warm up the leather rather than the dressing. I live where there's lots of sun, so it's easier for me than some. I leave the boots or saddle or jacket out in the sun for long enough for it to get warm, then apply with a clean sock, turned inside out so the nappy side is outside. I don't leave it out in the sun with the dressing on for too long, as that will cause over-penetration. Usually I will let the item soak it up in the shade, then wipe off the excess, especiallly around the threads. Works like a charm. I like Pecards, but for saddles and boots and tack, it seems to need re-treatment more often than the Williams, and in my opinion, is less useful for waterproofing. Frank Always! But I warm the leather and the treatments too. Works great, but you can overtreat it as it soaks up much more quickly!

frussell
03-07-2013, 02:12 PM
Absolutely, Scott. If I'm not worried about wipe marks or darkening the leather, like on a saddle, I do heat up the conditioner as well. My only issue with that has been that if I'm not quick enough, the warm conditioner penetrates one area before I get to the adjoining piece of leather, and sometimes makes a watermark-like overlap, which almost always fades with a little time. Sometimes heating up a treatment without stirring it back up will separate its oily components from the heavier ones, and the oil will sink in as fast as you wipe it on, literally leaving brush mark-like stripes. This is easily avoided with most good conditioners by warming it up, and then giving it a good stir to get it all rolled back together before applying. Frank.