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Medvssa
11-01-2009, 04:02 AM
In my search, all the threads we have about patterns are about pre-made patterns. Nothing about drafting your own that I have found.

Does anyone here draft their own? I find this to be the most fun of all the dressmaking activities. Don't get me wrong, I am just a dabbler, but I still love it. And the possibility to make or copy just anything you like or can imagine is just... :D

I am trying to get a bit better at it, so I have been reading this book (http://www.vintagesewing.info/1940s/42-mpd/mpd-toc-short.html), Modern Pattern Design by Harriet Pepin, from 1942, which I think is fantastic, so simply explained with great diagrams. And all the design ideas in it are just wonderful!

Just look at this (http://www.vintagesewing.info/1940s/42-mpd/illust/01-54-t.jpg), and this (http://www.vintagesewing.info/1940s/42-mpd/illust/08-200-a.jpg), this (http://www.vintagesewing.info/1940s/42-mpd/illust/01-51.jpg), and this (http://www.vintagesewing.info/1940s/42-mpd/illust/01-33-a.jpg)!

Lorena B
11-01-2009, 04:53 AM
I am currently doing a course in pattern making and drafting for the old Marti system ( an Spanish pattern making system dated from beginnings of the 1900 and awarded several awards like the 1914 London's International Expo. & the 1924 ParisInternatinal Expo)

The actual fact of creating the pattern with new measurements and all that is quite entertaining but at times confusing process but the most enjoyable part is definitely making the adaptations and transformations of the newly created pattern to get the look you are looking for.

Medvssa
11-01-2009, 06:01 AM
Lorena, now that you mention old Spanish pattern systems... perhaps some people may be interested in this old book I have online in PDF (http://www.innershelter.net/Metodo-de-corte-y-confeccion-Ruiz-1888.pdf) (47MB)!!.

It is a system first published in 1877, and this is the third edition from 1888. Beyond vintage :p My friend (http://vianocturna.livejournal.com/) owns the book, and took pictures of all the pages. I adjustied them and made the PDF.
There are patterns for hats too!

Of course this book is all in Spanish, but the method is pretty simple: you take the measurement around the bust and you see in a table (page 22, 20 of the PDF) to wich square measurement it corresponds (for example, 91 cm bust corresponds to a square of 6.5 cm side, which is the size h). The patterns are then drafted in a grid, the measurement of the sides of the squares being that that corresponds to your size.
Every size comprises the number given and all subsequent numbers until the next size (size h comprises between 91 and 97 size bust). Although, if the measurement is the exact given (91cm bust) and the garment is gonna be fitted, the backs should be cut using the previous size (g) and the fronts that that corresponds (h). I hope I explained myself clearly...
There are other variable measurements that can be taken, as waist (but this is mostly to be taken in at the darts) and sometimes lenght of body (from nape to waist) or lenght of arm. The book is a bit confusing when it comes to adapting the pieces to these measurements. It is explained in pages 24 and 25 (21 and 22 PDF).

crwritt
11-01-2009, 06:12 AM
Thanks for posting this. though I don't read spanish, the illustrations are beautiful. the necklines on the camisas are so pretty.

Lorena B
11-01-2009, 06:22 AM
Yes, i am agree with Crwritt.

It's really interesting Medvssa, i particularly like the part dedicated to the corsets.

I should read it more carefully to see if there is any similarities with the Marti.

Definitely a curious book for me, thank you for posting it Medvssa.

Lorena B
11-01-2009, 06:23 AM
Thanks for posting this. though I don't read spanish, the illustrations are beautiful. the necklines on the camisas are so pretty.
I am agree, they are delightful.

Lorena B
11-01-2009, 06:25 AM
By the way, has anyone any knowledge about how the Haslam method is about?
http://entertainment.webshots.com/album/566570624uPTrdu?vhost=entertainment

Medvssa
11-01-2009, 06:31 AM
No idea but thanks for the link!

Medvssa
11-01-2009, 08:28 AM
A bit lame that I post here again :p

But this is quite exciting (lol) I just finished, with the help of my wonderful boyfriend and the book I linked in the first post, my first set of bodice slopers. My boyfriend draped it on me and I corrected the pattern. It fit pretty much perfectly on the first mockup! :D

http://www.innershelter.net/journal/2009/11/IMG_4871.JPG

Now, theoretically, with this I can make any bodice I want :D :D :D

Amy Jeanne
11-01-2009, 10:05 AM
I've dabbled in drafting my own. I've been using re-prints of 1930s books in my self-drafting journey. Sometimes they can be incredibly confusing (and I know I'd have much better luck with a modern book!), but that's half the fun -- ie "vintage effort" :)

Pattern Making from 1937 (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1936049007/ref=ox_ya_oh_product) is the best one I have. It was written for a beginner. I love it!

1932 Dress Cutting Book (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1934268852/ref=ox_ya_oh_product). All that early 1930s-ness can be mine if I can ever find time to put the effort in!

1935 Pattern Making Book (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1934268909/ref=ox_ya_oh_product). This one is difficult and VERY mathmatical (like, from the get-go -- it assumes you already know this stuff!), but it's a cool book to have in your collection. And if I ever do get more advanced I'll be glad I bought it.

Lorena B
11-01-2009, 10:31 AM
A bit lame that I post here again :p

But this is quite exciting (lol) I just finished, with the help of my wonderful boyfriend and the book I linked in the first post, my first set of bodice slopers. My boyfriend draped it on me and I corrected the pattern. It fit pretty much perfectly on the first mockup! :D

http://www.innershelter.net/journal/2009/11/IMG_4871.JPG

Now, theoretically, with this I can make any bodice I want :D :D :D
Nice one!!!

Medvssa
11-01-2009, 10:47 AM
Thanks Lorena.

I've been using re-prints of 1930s books in my self-drafting journey.
They look like cool books, I will add them to my wishlist.

Sickofitcindy
11-01-2009, 12:32 PM
I have the Haslam system. It involves much more drafting than say the Lutterloh system. It involves the use of a template. I haven't used it yet but there are a lot of beautiful designs.

Lorena B
11-01-2009, 12:55 PM
I am agree, the designs are gorgeous and also noticed that they are as the system quite expensive.

I have also seen someone selling it for up to 75 :eek: and i am not talking about the originals but about the system scanned and CD reproduced.

Lauren
11-01-2009, 04:14 PM
I also draft my own patterns. I don't do as often from scratch as, say, modifying existing patterns, but when I do draft something up from scratch I prefer draping on the dress form. I've got a Wolf form I invested in quite a long while ago, and it's my baby. Here's a few photos of gowns I've made from draping or a combination of drapin/flat patterning. One isn't yet completed, but I'll add a picture of the muslin from a few weeks ago.
http://wearing-history.com/images/cicada.jpg
http://wearing-history.com/images/marilyngown.jpg
http://wearing-history.com/images/gingergown3.jpg
http://wearing-history.com/images/custom4.gif
http://wearing-history.com/images/gingericon.jpghttp://wearing-history.com/images/queeniedress.jpg

The Harriet Pepin book is great. I learned most everything from going to fashion school, but I really love collecting vintage drafting books, when possible. I have yet to pick up the ones AmyJeanne mentioned, but they're on my "someday" list!

SayCici
11-01-2009, 04:59 PM
http://wearing-history.com/images/marilyngown.jpg

Aaaaah! Beautiful, Lauren!!

Sickofitcindy
11-01-2009, 05:01 PM
Wow Lauren, I am in awe of your patternmaking schools. Those are gorgeous!

Lorena B
11-01-2009, 05:51 PM
me too, i am in awe!!

Lauren
11-01-2009, 05:59 PM
Thanks, gals! Draping's pretty awesome- if you have a form and learn the basics it's just all about creativity :)

Amy Jeanne
11-01-2009, 07:04 PM
I want to learn to drape so badly! I have a 3-week hiatus from school -- maybe I can learn to draft more and then play with draping!

Lady Day
11-01-2009, 07:29 PM
http://wearing-history.com/images/marilyngown.jpg

*GAW!* Amazing!
Whenever I see something like this, my brain tries to imagine the pieces unfolded and laid out flat and marked as to where the folds and drapes go. Its the most amazing puzzle!

I dont think I could ever truly attempt draping. My skill set is so bastardized, as I had no formal training, I dont feel Id do the craft justice.

LD

crwritt
11-01-2009, 08:28 PM
I find draping a quick method of arriving at a pattern, but I've come up with a technique of using plastic sheeting and packing tape. My work involves a lot of fake fur, since I make mascot costumes. I can get an almost exact pattern for the fur covering of a foam rubber mascot head using clear packing tape and a sharpie. I cover the head with tape, mark the seams and darts, cut it apart peel the tape pattern, then stick it down smoothly to craft paper.

I do some drafting of basic shapes, such as the outsize and odd shaped clothing I have to come up with, but with draping there's no guesswork. Drape it, mark carefully, cut it apart, there's your pattern.

Put it this way: drafting is more like math, draping is more like sculpture. Someone with an artistic eye like you, Lady Day, would have a blast with it.

Lady Day
11-02-2009, 12:55 AM
Put it this way: drafting is more like math, draping is more like sculpture.

Yeah!
The ladies I interned with said that too. It requires a 3D eye, so to speak. I took sculpture in undergrad (as well as pottery and model making) so I think I could grasp it, but my art background has me thinking a completely different way then I know this would.

As an animator I was taught every line needs to be intentional. Excess just clouds the movement. It has to be clean, functional and have intent. So whenever I create something, that thought process is in my head.

Now that Im doing more sewing, I see the effects of flourishes, and drape for drapes sake, and organic form, and its cool, and I totally respect it, but I would always be wanting to make it clean and efficent and functional. I guess thats why I like 40s styles so much :o

Oh, I just went off to a blathering...

Im more a construction person than an ascetic person. Designers are awesome, but what speaks to me is how something is actually made.

LD

Medvssa
11-02-2009, 02:21 AM
Ah, Lauren... I was going to quote the draped dress but it has already been quoted twice... of course! :) wonderful. I wish I had a good dressform too :o

Lauren
11-02-2009, 09:53 AM
Yeah!
The ladies I interned with said that too. It requires a 3D eye, so to speak. I took sculpture in undergrad (as well as pottery and model making) so I think I could grasp it, but my art background has me thinking a completely different way then I know this would.

As an animator I was taught every line needs to be intentional. Excess just clouds the movement. It has to be clean, functional and have intent. So whenever I create something, that thought process is in my head.

Now that Im doing more sewing, I see the effects of flourishes, and drape for drapes sake, and organic form, and its cool, and I totally respect it, but I would always be wanting to make it clean and efficent and functional. I guess thats why I like 40s styles so much :o

Oh, I just went off to a blathering...

Im more a construction person than an ascetic person. Designers are awesome, but what speaks to me is how something is actually made.

LD

I really think you could do well with draping. Math isn't my strong point, but I can also do flat patterning because it's mostly just basic math. What it really is is learning the basics but then embellishing them. Before I went to fashion school I was taking a lot of Art and considering being a fine arts major, so for a little while it WAS challenging, but draping just clicked. What you are doing is making intentional lines on your form. Not everything draped needs to have swags and flowing lines- a lot of the dresses I posted above, even though you can't see it in the pictures, have very definite seam lines that I could not have gotten as easily with flat patterning because it is like "sculpture" to the body. To get things to hang right you sometimes have to do it in 3-D!
Regarding the math- I can tell you that patterning really helped me improve certain parts. now I know that three little boxes on my clear ruler are 3/8", four are 1/2", and 6 are 3/4" :D hehe. It kind of starts to make sense when you HAVE to do it. I'm still really wretched, though, and have to use a calculator and have basic math scribbled all over sketch pads or other available scraps of paper. hehe. Draping doesn't use nearly as much math. Just need a tape measure, a measuring tape, pins, a dress form, and cheap muslin (I get mine by the roll at the $1 fabric store in the garment district). The dress form is the most expensive part, of course- non adjustable ones are best, and then sometimes grading is involved to get it to the right size- and that's where math and me have battles sometimes :eek: .

And thanks so much, gals! I need to actually get to making that dress. It's going to be really obnoxious blueish lame with tulle coming out of the slit whenever I actually get around to finishing it.

karlie
11-02-2009, 12:24 PM
I admire the skill of draping! It has always scared me! The methodical ways of pattern making just seems to suit me best!
I'm planning to invest in a bust form very soon, (i'm sick of poking myself with pins!) so I'm sure I'll give it a go then!

Miss Jess
11-03-2009, 04:48 PM
I enjoy draping quite a bit, I went to fashion school as well so I have formal training in patternmaking... however I find that I work very quickly when drafting, and I use draping to figure out any tricky pattern pieces... it's a system that works quite well for me.

I did take a wonderful advanced draping class in school that was completely sculptural and intuitive - basically we had to sketch a particular garment at the beginning of class, then completely drape it for critique by the end of the class period each day. Talk about working those draping muscles!

If anyone is seriously interested in learning patternmaking, I highly recommend taking a patternmaking course at your local vocational/technical college, you will most likely be learning from industry professionals who know their stuff inside and out.

~Psycho Sue~
11-04-2009, 05:51 AM
Ok Ladies..what's your opinion?

Is View A vintage inspired....there is something about it? What era?

http://www.simplicity.com/p-1570-missplus-size-sportswear.aspx

Also, I bought this one because of view B....it's the only plus pattern to be be found that is button-up front. Which is a 40s staple. Any ideas of what can be done to make it even more 40s?

http://www.simplicity.com/p-1984-missplus-size-sportswear.aspx

Snookie
11-04-2009, 09:01 PM
A bit lame that I post here again :p

But this is quite exciting (lol) I just finished, with the help of my wonderful boyfriend and the book I linked in the first post, my first set of bodice slopers. My boyfriend draped it on me and I corrected the pattern. It fit pretty much perfectly on the first mockup! :D

http://www.innershelter.net/journal/2009/11/IMG_4871.JPG

Now, theoretically, with this I can make any bodice I want :D :D :D

Medvssa, very smart for making your own block! Every time I'm in the throws of redrafting a pattern or sewing my 2nd or 3rd mockup, I say I'm going to do that, but then I never do...

I'm going to offer my unrequested opinion in the nicest, most constructive sense. Your bodice is a good start, but since for this project your goal needs to be the most perfect fit possible, I'm giving you my opinion.

First off, the shoulder area looks pretty great - from your photo it looks like you have sloped shoulders, and draping your own body captured that well. The armhole is a little messy though - I don't know if your bodice has seam allowance or not, if it does, that might be part of the problem. But it looks like there's some excess that should be rotated out of the armhole into the dart or pinched into a second dart. Also, it looks like the dart ends too high - it should end about 1" below the apex of your bust, but it looks like it extends above that. There are a few other wrinkles, but it's hard to tell if those are the bodice or because you're twisting in the photo. Your bodice should be as smooth and wrinkle free as possible when you're done.

Doing multiple fits and pattern corrections is a pain, but it'll be so worth it! :eusa_clap

Miss 1929
11-04-2009, 09:33 PM
Ok Ladies..what's your opinion?

Is View A vintage inspired....there is something about it? What era?

http://www.simplicity.com/p-1570-missplus-size-sportswear.aspx

Also, I bought this one because of view B....it's the only plus pattern to be be found that is button-up front. Which is a 40s staple. Any ideas of what can be done to make it even more 40s?

http://www.simplicity.com/p-1984-missplus-size-sportswear.aspx

View A looks like it could also do 40s, maybe make the sleeves either bigger and puffy, or more tailored and add contrasting cuffs.
I like them both! You will probably have to lengthen the skirt a bit - these might hit at above the knee or on the knee, and if they hit you anywhere from mid-calf to below the kneecap, they will be a bit more authentic.
I also can't quite tell what's going on with the belt - but if you look around on Ebay, you will find vintage belt buckle and button sets (if lady Day doesn't buy them all!) which will vintage-ify a dress really well.

Miss 1929
11-04-2009, 09:35 PM
I also draft my own patterns. I don't do as often from scratch as, say, modifying existing patterns, but when I do draft something up from scratch I prefer draping on the dress form. I've got a Wolf form I invested in quite a long while ago, and it's my baby. Here's a few photos of gowns I've made from draping or a combination of drapin/flat patterning. One isn't yet completed, but I'll add a picture of the muslin from a few weeks ago.
http://wearing-history.com/images/cicada.jpg
http://wearing-history.com/images/marilyngown.jpg
http://wearing-history.com/images/gingergown3.jpg
http://wearing-history.com/images/custom4.gif
http://wearing-history.com/images/gingericon.jpghttp://wearing-history.com/images/queeniedress.jpg

The Harriet Pepin book is great. I learned most everything from going to fashion school, but I really love collecting vintage drafting books, when possible. I have yet to pick up the ones AmyJeanne mentioned, but they're on my "someday" list!

Wow. I mean, wow. You really know your stuff. I adore the dark red satin!

Medvssa
11-05-2009, 01:23 AM
First off, the shoulder area looks pretty great - from your photo it looks like you have sloped shoulders, and draping your own body captured that well. The armhole is a little messy though - I don't know if your bodice has seam allowance or not, if it does, that might be part of the problem. But it looks like there's some excess that should be rotated out of the armhole into the dart or pinched into a second dart. Also, it looks like the dart ends too high - it should end about 1" below the apex of your bust, but it looks like it extends above that. There are a few other wrinkles, but it's hard to tell if those are the bodice or because you're twisting in the photo. Your bodice should be as smooth and wrinkle free as possible when you're done.
Snookie, thank you for your input :)

Yes my shoulders are very sloping. Not so ideal for Golden Era but everything has been attractive one time or another, right? ;) (this was great for the mid 1800s!). Anyway. Yes, the armholes have a big seam allowance, I left it there in case I wanted to set in sleeves or had to make corrections. There is also too much allowance around the neckline.
I thought about a second dart, but I also read in the book that fitting too much in that area can lead to wrinkles later on on the bodice, so it is better to leave it a bit straight than curving inwards. I had this problem before when I fitted a blouse pattern, and I didn't want to make the same error again. But yes perhaps I left too much room [huh]

About the darts :o well I am not wearing my bra in these pics lol I had it on during draping and first fitting, and the bust was consequently a little higher. But I will still try the mockup on again with bra to make sure.

My sloper is not perfect, that's for sure... but this is a big leap for me! Yesterday when I got home from work a bit early, I started drafting as if possessed by a fever :D The cardboard sloper worked wonderfully and my mockups needed very little adjustment, even though I did quite crazy things. This is the MOST fun I have had in a long, loooong while! In school I always enjoyed geometry (not so much maths though) and this is like a practical application of it, but the fun is x1000! I never thought it would be so much fun.
Anyway I am off to the fabric shop... wonderfully enough I have a day off due to train strike, and I must sew this dress today! It is dark today and the lightning is awful, plust the dress will hopefully be black, but I'll try to take pictures and show you all later :)

So exciting! :D

~Psycho Sue~
11-05-2009, 05:55 AM
Snookie, thank you for your input :)

Yes my shoulders are very sloping. Not so ideal for Golden Era but everything has been attractive one time or another, right? ;) (this was great for the mid 1800s!). Anyway. Yes, the armholes have a big seam allowance, I left it there in case I wanted to set in sleeves or had to make corrections. There is also too much allowance around the neckline.
I thought about a second dart, but I also read in the book that fitting too much in that area can lead to wrinkles later on on the bodice, so it is better to leave it a bit straight than curving inwards. I had this problem before when I fitted a blouse pattern, and I didn't want to make the same error again. But yes perhaps I left too much room [huh]

About the darts :o well I am not wearing my bra in these pics lol I had it on during draping and first fitting, and the bust was consequently a little higher. But I will still try the mockup on again with bra to make sure.

My sloper is not perfect, that's for sure... but this is a big leap for me! Yesterday when I got home from work a bit early, I started drafting as if possessed by a fever :D The cardboard sloper worked wonderfully and my mockups needed very little adjustment, even though I did quite crazy things. This is the MOST fun I have had in a long, loooong while! In school I always enjoyed geometry (not so much maths though) and this is like a practical application of it, but the fun is x1000! I never thought it would be so much fun.
Anyway I am off to the fabric shop... wonderfully enough I have a day off due to train strike, and I must sew this dress today! It is dark today and the lightning is awful, plust the dress will hopefully be black, but I'll try to take pictures and show you all later :)

So exciting! :D

this made me think of something! For sloping shoulders could you just draft for square shoulders and then sew shoulder pads into the garment, to keep the original lines of the design?? Hmmm.

Medvssa
11-05-2009, 07:43 AM
Yes you can, that's the point of shoulder pads lol there are instructions in the book I linked to in the first post. I am fine with my shoulders, though [huh] but it always depends on the garment, I think. The dress I am working on has structured sleeves that stick out a bit, but no shoulder pads. I used some organza to stiffen.

Snookie
11-05-2009, 07:04 PM
Medvssa, thank you for taking my comments in the spirit in which they were intended. I would never be so nitpicky here about the fit of a garment someone made, but as you know, if you don't fix your sloper then you have to fix every pattern that comes after. Glad to hear that you're patterning away and enjoying it!

GoddessMama
04-26-2010, 10:04 PM
Bumping this old thread to see if anyone out there has drafted their own lingerie patterns? I can't seem to find much of anything and I am thinking of doing this. :eek: lol

Miss_Becky
04-28-2010, 01:49 PM
I took both patterning making and draping classes. I feel that once I knew how to make paper patterns, draping was a breeze because I learned where darts and style lines should be on the body.

Draping is soooo much faster, and convenient. Even though I am horrible at math, learning how to do paper patterns helped me with those dreaded fractions that had plagued me since childhood LOL, so they hold a special place in my heart. ;)

I actually really love the process of paper patterns (measuring, adding, subtracting, cutting, taping...) I feel like an architect. And when I drape I feel like a sculptor :)

Here are the books we used in my program, they are my bibles....
"Draping for Apparel Design" and "Patternmaking for Fashion Design" both by Helen Joseph Armstrong

and if you don't want to spend the bucks, I really enjoy the 'vintage sewing info" website...pretty much everything you need to know about patternmaking is there. Patternmaking hasn't changed much, and everything that I learned in class and through 'modern' books, you can find the same info in old sewing books. The process hasn't changed, just the styles.

GoddessMama
04-29-2010, 07:05 AM
Thanks, I actually have pattern drafting and sizxing books, the name escapes me now though. They are somewhere in my sewing room in a box. :p I was hoping someone has drafted vintage lingerie before. lol

This is the last dress I drafted from slopers from a design I sketched, not very vintagy, but...
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y267/goddess3_2005/greendress.jpghttp://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y267/goddess3_2005/greendress2.jpg

ColeV48
05-03-2010, 04:07 PM
I love doing both. Most of the garments I've been draping lately are 18th century women's gowns and patterning 18th century stays and men's suits. It's done a bit differently than modern garments, but it's really helped with those. Gowns are cut on the person and suits are patterned by eye with paper "measuring" tapes that have only notches of the actual body measurements, no numbers.
I recently draped my wedding gown:
http://i266.photobucket.com/albums/ii272/ColeVintage/0730_1692.jpg
And patterned my husbands morning suit:
http://i266.photobucket.com/albums/ii272/ColeVintage/Wedding/0680_1551x.jpg
But like I said, most things are 18th century lately:
http://i266.photobucket.com/albums/ii272/ColeVintage/GreenHabit.jpg

GoddessMama
05-03-2010, 05:43 PM
Oh your work is just lovely! I so need a dress form that is my size so I can do draping again. Its so much fun!