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Bebop
10-07-2005, 10:16 PM
I know there are a lot of people that served in the military on The Lounge. I was wondering when you served, what was your job, for how long and where were you stationed?
I was in the Army, 1975-1979 stationed in Freidberg W.Germany as an artilleryman. I was on the same post that Elvis was stationed in the 50's. I used to eat at the Elvis A. Presley mess hall. Loved it more than I thought at the time. Moral was low during those years and you needed to concentrate to stay focused and centered in a mass of post hippie, post viet-nam, shoulder shrugging view of the military. I miss those days of no war, just war games. It was an experience that I think most should go through. I suppose ideally, we could skip the war thing and just do the military thing. Made me grow up and become a team player. :cheers1:

Badluck Brody
10-07-2005, 10:54 PM
Infantry (11-H Anti-armor)

Most of my time was spent at Ft. Lewis WA, then partying in Seattle. God I miss that place. If I wasn't tied here and a bit younger, I'd leave in a second and go back!!!

Incidentally I just found out one of my best friends (him and my buddy Rich are like brothers to me. Not to mention their family treat me better than my own), was just wounded in Iraq. Without saying anything that might conflict with protocol and propriety, I'm told he's being credited with saving his crew from a roadside SUI bomber.

My god... I remember when I first met him when him and his brother got back from basic training.... Two of the best damn soldiers, best damn friends a man could ask for. Maybe it's just survivor's guilt, but I wish to God I could have been there for him or even taken his place. Well atleast the war is over for him now and he's comming home. I couldn't be more proud of him.

I just wish I could have been there for him.......

Brody

Biltmore Bob
10-08-2005, 05:16 AM
Uncle Sam's Misguiged Children 80-84, 1st Bn 9th Marines, 0311 Rifleman OOOH RAAAH!

zeus36
10-08-2005, 10:13 AM
Went into the US Navy in 1983 via the Cleveland, Ohio MEPS center as an Aviation Electronics Technician (AT) with Recruit training in Orlando, FL. Shipped up to Millington TN (near Memphis) for "A" school.

Volunteered for Aircrewman School in Pensacola, FL. then did my aircraft Heuy UH-1N familiarization with HC-16 squadron also in Pensacola. Flew in Heuy's as a Utility Crewchief until I shipped out to the West Coast and Point Mugu NAS where I trained to become a Huey Polar Crewchief for deployments to McMurdo Station in Antarctica.

Did three deployments to the Ice in '84 '85, and '86. Got out in 1987 and stayed in the Ventura area till this day. I am originally from Canton, Ohio.

airfrogusmc
10-08-2005, 05:00 PM
USMC 73-77 flightcrew CH-46 crewchief.

airfrogusmc
10-08-2005, 05:36 PM
Zues, I was in Millington for basic helicopter school in early 74.

airfrogusmc
10-08-2005, 06:42 PM
http://www.thefedoralounge.com/showthread.php?t=4225

boomerchop
10-09-2005, 10:35 AM
I'm new to the boards, and learning alot from all of the posts. I'm retired Navy and my screen name comes from my submarine and Supply Corps background. I was on the USS SAM RAYBURN (SSBN635G), which is a "boomer" or fleet ballistic missile submarine and one of the original 41 for Freedom. "Chop" is a nickname for supply officers, short for porkchop, since food service is one of our responsibilities. I served from 1978 to 1994, taking an early retirement during the big drawdown when they were trying to get rid of people. Also served on USS PROTEUS in Guam and USS ORION in La Maddalena, Italy, in addition to a variety of shore jobs.

Looking forward to getting further acquainted with everyone here.

Paul Webb

Badluck Brody
10-10-2005, 08:28 PM
That can go any where from military & mobster to gunslinger!!!

Take care

Brody

varga49
10-11-2005, 08:01 PM
USN 1970-74...DOD 1974-87 I played with Bombs, Rockets, Small Arms, and other things that go BOOM

Trickeration
10-12-2005, 01:00 AM
I'm new to the boards, and learning alot from all of the posts. I'm retired Navy and my screen name comes from my submarine and Supply Corps background. I was on the USS SAM RAYBURN (SSBN635G), which is a "boomer" or fleet ballistic missile submarine and one of the original 41 for Freedom. "Chop" is a nickname for supply officers, short for porkchop, since food service is one of our responsibilities. I served from 1978 to 1994, taking an early retirement during the big drawdown when they were trying to get rid of people. Also served on USS PROTEUS in Guam and USS ORION in La Maddalena, Italy, in addition to a variety of shore jobs.

Looking forward to getting further acquainted with everyone here.

Paul Webb

Wow! A fellow submariner (in a sense)! Obviously I wasn't on a sub, but my husband was so I guess I'm speaking for him. He was on the USS San Juan SSN751, a fast attack sub in Groton, Ct. from 1991 to 1996. He was a "nuke" or nuclear mechanic, working on the reactor among other duties in the engine room. He made 3 trips to the North Pole with that boat. Then, from 1996 to 1998, he was on the USS Simon Lake AS-33, a sub tender in La Maddelena, Italy. I did have a military job, though. I worked for 3 of his CO's over 6 of those years as command ombudsman.

My husband is now an aerospace engineer, but he's also in the Coast Guard Reserve, attatched to the Cutter Blackfin out of Santa Barbara. It'll be 16 years with the military this January. He also got his commission last July :clap .

Boomerchop, it's nice to 'meet' you. I hope you enjoy the lounge. Oh, before I forget, did you like La Maddelena? I loved it. We lived just up the hill from the NSA, across the street from a little restaurant called Vera Napoli.

macawber
10-12-2005, 02:25 AM
I was in the Army 1966-68 and my job was as a Flight operation coordinator.I was a draftee and had the the most outstanding luck to score this job. My first job was to be a light weapons infantryman but the Brigade was over crowded and I got the above job after an interview.
I went to Viet Nam in 1967 and eight months later was medivaced after a schrapnel wound. During my time in Viet Nam I was at An Khe, Bong Son, LZ El Paso and Camp Evans not to far from the DMZ. My wounding was another fortunate event as my group was on its way to Khe Sahn. Most Viet Nam vets would have heard of that place.

Prairie Shade
10-12-2005, 06:13 AM
BORN: 02sept1947
INDUCTED: U S ARMY 9-66
DISCHARGED: 9-68
RANK: E-5
MILITARY MOS --11C-11B
UNITS ASSIGNED: 2ND AD - FT HOOD TX
1ST CAV (AIR) RVN

A&D: NDSM-GCM-ARCOM-VNSM-VNCM-AM-CIB - DUC- 2 O/S STRIPES

Thanks for the ride Macawber ( I think).

macawber
10-13-2005, 01:04 AM
Prarie Shade
You would have gone to your combat assaults in one of the 11th aviation groups choppers,unless you were in the 9th Cav. As I recall they had there own choppers with crossed sabres painted on the front, and a lot of the fellas looked like they were in Custers army. When I think about it it doesn't seem like a long time ago.

phre7
10-24-2005, 11:28 PM
Submarine Sonar Tech. Everywhere from San Diego Ca., Groton Ct., Bremerton Wa., to Charleston SC.
Punched holes in the Atlantic and Mediteranian. Commands include USS John Marshall (SSN-611), USS Thomas Jefferson (SSN-618), sub tender USS Frank Cable (AS-40), along with Instructor duty (SUBTRAFAC CHASN).
Boomerchop, I crossed over the the decks of the Orion with orders to my first Sub. Were you there in March 1982?
It all seem so long ago!

boomerchop
10-25-2005, 03:12 AM
No, I wasn't on ORION then. I had just left my boat and moved to the aircraft carrier acquisition office at NAVSEA in early 1982. I didn't get to ORION until 1991, and even the PROTEUS was still in my future.

DanielJones
10-26-2005, 09:28 PM
24th Marine Amphibious. Scout Sniper. Nuf' Said.

Cheers!

Dan

CasaBlancaChuck
10-26-2005, 09:41 PM
US Army Military Police 1965-67...served as a Parole Officer (2nd Lt.) Us Disciplinary Barracks, Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas one year and, platoon leader, Co A, 716th Military Police Bn 1966-67 Republic of Vietnam........

matei
10-28-2005, 08:56 AM
When I was living in the US I was an 96B Intel Analyst in the USAR (!)... However, most of my brief career I actually did another MOS's work - 97L (translator). Uncle Sugar decided that since I'm multi-lingual they could save a few bucks by having me train in a different specialty and skip having to send me to Monterrey. If I were only wiser... I could strangle that recruiter now, but I needed money to go to college.

All in all it was an excellent experience. I got to go all over the place (more than I wanted to), work in embassies, meet interesting people - heads of state, military types, all sorts - and get to see all sorts of behind-the-scenes stuff I normally wouldn't have heard about.

A cool thing was that I had to dress in a suit (no pickle suit - rather civvies) 90% of the time, so I got paid to do all the above and look good! :cool:

But best of all there was no one shooting at me, nor was I shooting at anyone else, during my brief stint in the USAR.

Harp
06-07-2007, 02:25 PM
Prarie Shade
When I think about it it doesn't seem like a long time ago.


...seems like only yesterday, sometimes....:o

HeadHunter
06-07-2007, 02:50 PM
US Army and US Army Reserve 1972-1995. I mostly served in Airborne, Ranger, and Special Forces units with one tour as a Mech Infantry Company Commander.

J. M. Stovall
06-07-2007, 02:56 PM
Tank Platoon Leader for two years, then to Ft. Rucker for flight school. Spent the next 8 years as a pilot in the 1st Battalion 149th Aviation, 49th Armor Division. Left the guard as a 1LT.

Zeropositive
06-07-2007, 05:33 PM
Prarie Shade
You would have gone to your combat assaults in one of the 11th aviation groups choppers,unless you were in the 9th Cav. As I recall they had there own choppers with crossed sabres painted on the front, and a lot of the fellas looked like they were in Custers army. When I think about it it doesn't seem like a long time ago.

wasn't that in that vietnam movie AIR CAV DEATH FROM ABOVE??
lol

BIG DUKE SIX....
Napalm that gasoline smell it smells like victory

Tango Yankee
06-07-2007, 08:06 PM
Well, this is an old thread to be revived!

Career field was Computer Operations (ran the Big Iron, mainframes) which was merged with Communications in 1984. When I retired I was responsible for the accountability of all USAF IT assets in Southwest Asia as well as the comm planning for a couple of exercises with the Bahrain and Kuwaiti air forces.

Assignments:

HQ SAC, Offutt AFB, (near Omaha, NE) Oct 1980-Feb 1986
Osan AB, Korea, Feb 1986-Feb 1987
Bergstrom AFB, Austin, TX, Mar 1987-Dec 1990
Rhein-Main AB, Frankfurt, Germany, Dec 1990-Dec 1993
Ramstein AB, near Kaiserslautern, Germany, Dec 1993-Dec 1995
Anderson AFB, Guam, Jan 1996-Apr 1998
RAF Molesworth/RAF Alconbury/RAF Upwood (AKA "The Tri-Base") Jun 1998-Jun 2002
Shaw AFB, Sumter, SC, July 2002-Jun 2005

Various deployments along the way, including Desert Shield and Iraqi Freedom.

Cheers,
Tom

Spitfire
06-08-2007, 12:54 AM
I was drafted. Spent 14 boring months in a communications/signal regiment in Denmark back in 1967.
I am neither especially proud or hillariously fond of that period.
To me it was a lot af time wasted, while waiting to get on with my studies and education.
All in all...booooring!

MagistrateChris
06-08-2007, 06:54 AM
United State Miliitary Academy at West Point
United States Army during the Cold War
I earned a black beret...it wasn't issued to me. (pet peeve).

Twitch
06-08-2007, 08:10 AM
0321 recon Marine in country 69-70.http://s8.photobucket.com/albums/a15/Twitch98/th_usmcflagwaving1.gif

GoldLeaf
06-08-2007, 08:38 AM
I earned a black beret...it wasn't issued to me. (pet peeve).

First :eusa_clap Then, yeah, me too. I am an Army brat, my Dad was in for 22, he was a Chaplain's Assistant. I learned respect for the men who wore the berets. Outstanding men. A bit OT, but we had a green beret that was friends with the family, and he sure was dashing to an 8 year old girl! lol

Harp
06-08-2007, 09:07 AM
A bit OT, but we had a green beret that was friends with the family, and he sure was dashing to an 8 year old girl! lol


:D :D :D

Haversack
06-08-2007, 10:40 AM
Artillery officer 1980-86. Lance Missiles and Buckets of Sunshine in the BRD.

Haversack.

HoosierDaddy
06-08-2007, 03:01 PM
Drafted...July 1970
Basic Training..Ft.Knox,Ky
OJT...Ft. Puke,Louseyanna Sept 1970
Drill Sgt School...TigerLand Ft.Polk 1971
Discharged...1972..Brigade HQ..Ft. Knox
Esprit De Corps
HD

carebear
06-08-2007, 03:17 PM
0321 recon Marine in country 69-70.http://s8.photobucket.com/albums/a15/Twitch98/th_usmcflagwaving1.gif

I stand upon the shoulders of giants and in the shadows of better men than me...

0321 Recon '91-'04 USMC(Reserve)

DELTA0321
06-08-2007, 06:48 PM
1985-2005 USMC

2d Recon
3d Recon
5th Force Recon
ARS Instructor
DI Parris Island
& some assorted fun spots.

v/r
Steve

carebear
06-08-2007, 07:18 PM
If we form a team, I got dibs on the SAW. :D

rockyj
06-11-2007, 07:40 PM
Drafted...July 1970
Basic Training..Ft.Knox,Ky
OJT...Ft. Puke,Louseyanna Sept 1970
Drill Sgt School...TigerLand Ft.Polk 1971
Discharged...1972..Brigade HQ..Ft. Knox
Esprit De Corps
HD
Wow!
Also Drafted in 1970 (MAY)
Also had Basic at FT.Knox
Also AIT Training at FT.Poke LA. (JUNE and July)
Sec. AIT Training at FT. SAM Houston( O.R tech) Sept and Oct 1970
RSVN Dec 1970-Aug.1971

HoosierDaddy
06-11-2007, 08:31 PM
Wow!
Also Drafted in 1970 (MAY)
Also had Basic at FT.Knox
Also AIT Training at FT.Poke LA. (JUNE and July)
Sec. AIT Training at FT. SAM Houston( O.R tech) Sept and Oct 1970
RSVN Dec 1970-Aug.1971

Wow..small world,huh! I shoulda been drafted July of 1965...but tried matrimony. Finally..the day after my divorce..I boarded the bus. Quite a transformation going from hot homecooked meals..and hot(well..you know what I mean)..to Uncle's way of life. Too bad we didn't meet at Polk...although I prob wasn't the most pleasant troop to be around going through that transformation...
HD
BTW...D-16-4 brick barracks at Knox BTC

MagistrateChris
06-12-2007, 09:13 AM
If we form a team, I got dibs on the SAW. :D

Fine with me, so long as I can get back my old gear package, an M-4 with all the trimmings, a nicely cut down 12 gauge for opening doors and other close up issues, and a 1911 with just the rights mods. I was in at the end of the 1911 and beginning of the M9. I like the Beretta, but would prefer a little more power out of a package that big.

Nashoba
06-12-2007, 04:13 PM
If we form a team, I got dibs on the SAW. :D
lol
you boys and your toys :D

I tried to get the Corps to take me but they wouldn't for medical reasons and I couldn't get a waiver.
So I married a Marine instead :) I'm a sucker for that uniform and I was going to get into those blues one way or another ;) ....lol

carebear
06-12-2007, 05:00 PM
lol
you boys and your toys :D

It's a tactical move, even at 36, I'm probably the junior of the Recon guys. If I can get the SAW I won't have to carry the radio. ;)


I tried to get the Corps to take me but they wouldn't for medical reasons and I couldn't get a waiver.
So I married a Marine instead :) I'm a sucker for that uniform and I was going to get into those blues one way or another ;) ....lol

...and I'm sure your husband would rather see you in it than him. :D

renor27
06-12-2007, 09:25 PM
First go around 91 T worked on the K9s and horses pluss the pets of the folks on base.
2nd go arounds 91 W California National Guard ( choppers ) Before 911 was the medical wing to the CDF wild land fires. Discharged Dec 01.
Alwasy worked the medical side of things.
Now work as a Tech in surgical @ local hospital while going to school for a BS in Bio.
David

Nashoba
06-13-2007, 09:22 AM
It's a tactical move, even at 36, I'm probably the junior of the Recon guys. If I can get the SAW I won't have to carry the radio. ;)

lol amen to that


...and I'm sure your husband would rather see you in it than him. :D

Of that I have absolutely no doubt.

Harp
06-14-2007, 04:58 PM
If I ascend into heaven, thou art
there: if I descend into hell thou
art present.

If I take my wings early in the
morning, and dwell in the uttermost
parts of the sea:

Even there also shall thy hand
lead me: and thy right hand
hold me.

Psalm 138; 8-10
Dominie, probasti
Unto the end. A psalm of David

PADDY
06-15-2007, 01:36 AM
http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r39/PADDY_MIDDLETON/MVC-024E.jpg
http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r39/PADDY_MIDDLETON/PaddyArmy2.jpg
http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r39/PADDY_MIDDLETON/Paddyarmy.jpg

SPCMickyKilian
06-18-2007, 06:17 AM
Entered Army National Guard 22 May 03
Basic/AIT (osut) at Fort Benning, GA- School of Infantry 15 Wks 11B10
routine drilling and activations...
NYC Surge to protect RR Stations, 22 July 05-31 Sept 05
routine drilling and activations...
Oct 4, recieved phone call, notified to report for Active Duty, Camp Shelby, MS. (try consoling ur wife after being told u have a week to put ur life in order...it was a first of many firsts for me...)
Oct 7, reported Camp Shelby MS, trained til 15 Nov.
Arrived Kuwait 16 Nov.
Arrived Iraq 26 Nov,
Arrived permanent base, 29 Nov.
Since tour started have been numerous places around AO,
March 19-24 R&R Qatar
Home, TBA
End of enlistment 21 May 09...

Harp
06-18-2007, 07:30 AM
Hang in there Mick, you're getting shorter every day and deros will arrive. :)

carter
06-18-2007, 08:35 AM
Drafted August 1970 while working as Advance Man for Geo. Rawlings U.S. Senate campaign in VA
Enlisted in US Army (delayed induction).
Inducted January 1971
Basic Training - Ft. Campbell, KY
AIT - Ft. Polk, LA (11C-40)
Jump School - Ft. Benning, GA
Orders to Viet Nam cancelled when Nixon cancelled all levies to same.
Requested posting to Germany
Posted to South Korea, 2nd Infantry Division
Arrived Inchon - reassigned to UN HQ J3, Seoul.
1 year later - orders to Ft. Lewis, WA as DI.
Chose to extend in Korea.
Discharged Oct. 15, 1973 in CA.

Neither the best nor worst years of my life but I shaped up and learned some discipline. I'd say the experience has stood me in good stead. I still have my uniform somewhere around here. Fits a much smaller guy!

Harp
06-18-2007, 07:04 PM
I can still recall Ft Polk's Bulldog Hall. :o

Tango Yankee
06-18-2007, 07:33 PM
I earned a black beret...it wasn't issued to me. (pet peeve).

That whole black beret thing annoyed a lot of people including a bunch of us in the USAF. You simply don't take something that many people paid dearly to earn and turn around and give it to everyone. That wasn't a good move at all.

A peeve of mine was with my last unit. I was assigned to HQ US Central Air Forces at Shaw AFB. When I first arrived there I saw a bunch of people walking around in DCUs wearing the Marine DCU cap. I thought there were a heck of a lot of Marines on this base, until I got close enough to see the "Marine" was wearing USAF insignia. Turned out one of the USCENTAF commanders at some point decided that the Marine cap would be the cap worn by HQ USCENTAF personnel. Later it became the cap for all USAF in the AOR. When deployed I wore the optional floppy hat. I was never comfortable wearing that Marine cap--I wasn't a Marine and didn't feel like I had the right to wear something that would make me appear to be one from a short distance or more. I'd earned my stripes, but not the right to wear a Marine uniform item.

Regards,

Tom

mikepara
06-19-2007, 12:18 PM
Maroon machine.

The head sheds sometimes have no concept of Esprit de Corps or what motivates men. A £10.00 beret can be something sacred if earned.

The same thing happened with the Maroon beret. In WWII it was worn by all Airborne troops whether Paratroops or Gliderborne but you had to be one or the other, occasionally both.

In post war days right upto 5 Airborne brigade you had to pass the infamous P-Company to wear a maroon beret.

Now if your posted to 16 Airmobile brigade you get one with your cornflakes (or a sky blue Army Air Corps one) Neither earned.

Lots of Remfs and girls walking around posing in town.

Now the only outer sign is the BBC The blue badge of Courage (Wings)

Cicero
06-19-2007, 01:14 PM
Served the Army in 1985-2005, mainly as a Belgian Para-Commando trooper.
Did 3 Operations..Za?Øre (Congo), Somalia and Rwanda in the mid '90s.

As a U.N Soldier in Somalia.
http://img39.picoodle.com/img/img39/8/6/19/t_101m_fd68fc1.jpg (http://www.picoodle.com/view.php?srv=img39&img=/8/6/19/f_101m_fd68fc1.jpg)

Rwanda.
http://img38.picoodle.com/img/img38/8/6/19/t_A039m_457942e.jpg (http://www.picoodle.com/view.php?srv=img38&img=/8/6/19/f_A039m_457942e.jpg)

dhermann1
06-19-2007, 02:27 PM
In the summer of 1966 I had just dropped out of college (not doing too good at all) and had received my notice for my draft physical, which meant that being drafted was soon to come. I went down to the 4 services recruiter in Jamestown NY to see what my alternatives were. The Navy and Air Force had their quotas full through November, but not the Marines! And since I had a Marine Corps heritage (my parents met in Washington during WWII when they both worked on Leatherneck Magazine) I had always had a feeling about the Marine Corps. So I joined up! I took the 3 year enlistment option, to try to get a better MOS. As things turned out, I wound up in Hawaii, and never got to Vietnam, even tho I enlisted at the height of the war. (That's a story for another occasion.)
I was a Data Processing Operator at Camp Smith, in Halawa Heights, overlooking Pearl Harbor. I got there in June of 1967, just in time to watch them "bomb" Pearl harbor all over again when they made the movie "Tora! Tora! Tora!"
I never got to Nam, and I have mixed feelings about that. But I'm proud I served. I was far from a Medal of Honor Marine, but I showed up for work every day and did my job. I got to go to rock concerts with Jimmy Hendricks and Jefferson Airplane and hang out on the beach at Waikiki every day.
We used to go down to Ft DeRussy where the R&R guys stayed, and buy burritos and cokes. The huge hollow black eyes those guys had as they got off the bus told you more about combat than any movie could ever portray.
As I said, I never saw any more action than a computer display could provide, but I learned a lot about life. I learned enough to believe, even tho I consider myself definitely left of center politically, that there should be universal military service. Period. Every one should serve. It's good for the country to have a citizenry that understands what the military represents, both good and bad.
OK, I'm off my soapbox. Who's next?

Harp
06-19-2007, 02:54 PM
Ever check out the wahinies and surf over at Kaneohe? :)
Oahu was a great crash pad. :)

Story
06-19-2007, 02:57 PM
As I said, I never saw any more action than a computer display could provide, but I learned a lot about life. I learned enough to believe, even tho I consider myself definitely left of center politically, that there should be universal military service. Period. Every one should serve. It's good for the country to have a citizenry that understands what the military represents, both good and bad.

Service guarantees citizenship. http://sportsforum.ws/images/smilies/new2/thumbsup.gif Would you like to know more?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMTz9nIUkGc

dhermann1
06-19-2007, 04:01 PM
Ever check out the wahinies and surf over at Kaneohe? :)
Oahu was a great crash pad. :)
Mucho plenty wahinies. "Coed season".
I tried body surfing once at Blow Hole, and got cartwheeled 360 degrees. My feet were in the air and my head was pointing straight down. I swallowed a couple quarts of salt water. I decided then and there that I was a fresh water Marine. But I had a lot of great experiences there. There were just a few remnants of the WW II Hawaii that I was able to explore. The bars on Hotel St were just about passe as hangouts, and Waikiki was the in place.
You could walk thru the International Marketplace and hear Don Ho singing to the tourists every night. Saw the Hawaii Islanders at their old stadium on King St. Went up to the north shore to Waialua and Haleiwa, when they were still country villages. Flew to the Big Island on a C-54 and back on a C-47. On the way back the pilot, who was a programmer in our office, but was also a pilot, got his hours in by cruising in a slow low circle over the Kilauea Crater for about an hour. That was VERY cool. Then went back to work and processed the raw data of a very real war on the other side of the Ocean. You experienced the reality of it even at that distance.
But I was very lucky. Very lucky. Wouldn't trade the experience for anything, but I wouldn't do it again.

Harp
06-19-2007, 04:21 PM
Parts of Oahu were locked back in time it seemed, the smaller
commmunities that pocketed the island. One place had a drug store
with a 1930s soda fountain bar, the works. Loved Honolulu, but it
was crowded and being a transient non permanent party, I tried to
stay away from congestion, especialy Hotel Street bars-- MP/SP. lol
Kaneohe and the windward side of Oahu was my favorite beach. :)

dhermann1
06-19-2007, 05:42 PM
When were you there? I looked at Waikiki on Google Earth ,and where the Jungle used to be is all big buildings, I assume condos and hotels. The north shore was totally rural back then. I fell in love with Haleiwa, but I looked at the places for sale there on Realtor.com recently, and realized that it's completely gone now.
This thread has put me on a roller coaster of emotions, I must say.
I just want to say to all you active duty guys (and gals) out there, that my hat's off to you. There couldn't be a more stressful combat situation to be living through (except perhaps Stalingrad). We're all thinking about you and praying for your safe (and sane) return.

Harp
06-19-2007, 06:08 PM
When were you there?



'Nam-time, R&R cruisin; stayed away from Waikiki and crashed in
Honolulu's Makiki Heights, and hung around the Windward side; tried
to stay away from military as much as possible. lol

dhermann1
06-19-2007, 06:16 PM
If you were there between June 67 and July 69 I might have seen you getting off that bus at DeRussy. Military experience sure is a game of chance. Right after my boot leave in June 67, when I was on my way out to Hawaii, I bumped into an old friend at the local airport. I was a Marine private, he was an Army 2d Looie, but it didn't matter. We chatted and wished each other luck, and took off in our separate directions. We both came back. Me having smoked a few tons of dope in Waikiki, him after getting his platoon out of hot water in Vietnam, getting a big ugly scar in his achilles tendon, and picking up a Silver Star. You just never know.
Hey, I gotta pack. Going on vaca in minutes. Later.

Nashoba
06-19-2007, 07:12 PM
Home, TBA
End of enlistment 21 May 09...


You're in the homestretch :) hang in there!

Harp
06-19-2007, 07:21 PM
If you were there between June 67 and July 69 I might have seen you getting off that bus at DeRussy. Military experience sure is a game of chance.



I was in the game's fourth and last-get-out-quarter, and have only myself
to blame...lol we all chose it and all, my outfit; and I would not trade any
of it, or the guys I served with. But life was never the same afterwards. :o

ohairas
06-19-2007, 08:59 PM
Thank you everyone for your service! :eusa_clap
Nikki

Madcap72
05-18-2008, 07:15 AM
Joined the Marines in 2000.
First deployment was after 9/11, spent 5 months on standby in the Arabian gulf. Never got feet dry. BUT got to hit Dubai, Singapore, Thailand, Australia and Hawaii coming back. On top of training on the Big Island oh Hawaii, and some more in Kenya.

Second Deployment was to invade Iraq (actually called everyone on Christmas leave, 25 Dec.). Left January got to Kuwait in Feb. Invaded March, home in Oct. Drove straight north to Baghdad, went through An Nasaryia, lots of the intersection fights, Al Kut, and into Saddam City. Took over the Cigerrette factory, the UN weapons inspectors compound and finally settled in the Musayib Power Plant. Also spent time at a Pistol Factory in Al hillah, and the ruins of Babylon.

Was in STA plt.
Javelins (Anti Armour) Driver (IFAV)
HQ plt.
CAAT (combined anti-amour) Driver/ vehicle commander (TOW Hmmwv)

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii297/thejackal72/Scan10032.jpg
Camp Pendleton, Hero shot.



http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii297/thejackal72/Scan10011.jpg
Truck I drove in Iraq. (I have the dirt bag mustache).

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii297/thejackal72/Scan10023.jpg

Haze Gray and underway some where in a long stretch of Pacific Ocean.

SGT Rocket
05-18-2008, 10:24 AM
Army 1986 to 1989– 82C/13C: Field Artillery Surveyor

Minn National Guard– 2007 to present: 13C and I’m reclassifying to 35F– Intel Analyst.

I’m being deployed in early 2009 to Iraq (January they say). Upon my return, I’m going to try to get into Warrant OCS. I’m hoping to go full time guard after that. If not, I’ll stay part time guard and try to get a federal job that can use my skills in DC.

DrSpeed
05-18-2008, 12:38 PM
I've served as a doctor in the Royal Netherlands Army and was deployed to Afghanistan.
I agree with mikepara and tangoyankee amongst others; don't wear uniform items you haven't earned. You're bringing yourself down.
There's no shame in not being a super duper commando, there is in pretending to be one. What's the use?
I wouldn't expect someone to wear a medical badge who's not a medic, after all.

Gaige
05-18-2008, 02:47 PM
0844 MOS: Field Artillery Fire Direction/Control Specialist, USMC

Diamondback
05-18-2008, 03:20 PM
As someone who's still trying to drop the weight to join up, gotta offer a healthy "Semper Fi!"* to all of you.

*Yes, I know it's officially USMC, but it strikes me as good words for anyone to live by, no matter what uniform one wears (or even if no uniform at all).

Aviator
05-18-2008, 03:45 PM
Active duty Coast Guard; enlisted in 1988 and served aboard a Cutter out of Portsmouth, VA.
Then went to yeoman (clerk/typist/pay specialist) school and was stationed at HQ in DC for 4 years (we are the only service with our HQ in DC...little known fact).
Then back to a cutter out of Hawaii (Sand Island on O'ahu), where I was fortunate enough to go to Navy Dive School at Ford Island and get my scuba bubble, as we had working divers on board the ship I was on. That was a fantastic 3.5 years as we went all over the Pacific as well as the other islands...fond memories of the 50th state.
Then back to Virginia, this time at Yorktown where I was stationed for a year, before being picked up for officer candidate school.
Then it was flight school with training just north of Pensacola, as well as Corpus Christi, TX and Little Rock, Arkansas.
Then 4 years flying the C-130 out of Elizabeth City, NC, doing Search and Rescue, Homeland Security patrols, and some International Ice Patrol flights out of St. Johns, Newfoundland.
Lastly, I have been flying out of Florida for the last 4 years, doing migrant patrols & Search and Rescue, and will do another year here, as well.
Life has been good.

Maguire
05-18-2008, 04:40 PM
I am not nor have i ever done anything remotely military.. however I plan on joining some military organization once i'm out of the United States and have my citizenship papers in orders. Ideally I'd really like to join the Spanish Legion but if that fails me or becomes too difficult logistically I'd even settle for the Army in Ireland. Although i believe the place of the military has changed drastically in society since the turn of the 20th century, its still an important thing one should go through, train, etc. The discipline is something sorely lacking in both myself and in society as a whole and the military could help kick that out of me.

Slim Portly
05-18-2008, 06:46 PM
I served in various capacities with both the Air Force and the Navy, first in the medical field and then in weapons development and testing. When you see the movies where the military guys are in the big rooms with lots of computer screens and the giant wall display of the world with lines showing missiles and such flying around, that's where I used to work.

WH1
05-18-2008, 06:52 PM
USMC 1371 Combat Engineer Currently 8999 1st Sergeant
Desert Storm
Central America/Drug War
OIF
Enlisted 1984-Still serving

Thank the young ones serving, they are the ones doing the hard work. Don't thank me I'm just doing my job.
Semper Fidelis

Tommydean
05-18-2008, 10:26 PM
US NAVY from 1981 to 1985 was a aviation structural mech on A-6 Intruders
(VA-75) the Sunday Punchers!! out of Nas Oceana Va Beach Va, did two med IO cruises on the USS John F Kennedy and sat off the cost of beruit after the attack on the marine barracks in 1983. got out in 1985 moved to Denver were i stayed.

imported_the_librarian
05-18-2008, 11:25 PM
Guess I'll pitch in my duffel bag here.

Field Arty. Track Mech. 2/138th FA 1/623 FA

Enlisted only.

M-110
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M110_howitzer)

M-109
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M109_Paladin)

My vehicle: M-578
(http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bergepanzer_M_578)

Operation Desert Storm

Get this, went to Ft. Polk for basic (late eighties)...they had just reactivated the training component...on the rifle range, my farthest target had a tree in front of it...I got the points! :)

Still had the open bays, insignias and monikers from the sixties all over the the place...time warp almost, but they were redoing things the same time we were there.

Any of you still remember the Gamma Goat? Jeeez what a pain to work on!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gama_Goat

Sjoconn
05-19-2008, 04:13 AM
1986 - 1995 as an MP in the Reserves with trips to: Alaska, Germany (REFORGER), Desert Shield/Storm, Panama, and Japan.

1995 - 2001 Active duty as as a Signals Intelligence Analyst

2001 - 2004 attended SFQC

2004 - present Special Forces Medical Sergeant

5 more years until I live the good life as an Ex-pat sitting on a beach in the tropics.

Its been a blast and couldnt imagine doing anything else.

Sean

Madcap72
05-19-2008, 06:32 AM
1986 - 1995 as an MP in the Reserves with trips to: Alaska, Germany (REFORGER), Desert Shield/Storm, Panama, and Japan.

1995 - 2001 Active duty as as a Signals Intelligence Analyst

2001 - 2004 attended SFQC

2004 - present Special Forces Medical Sergeant

5 more years until I live the good life as an Ex-pat sitting on a beach in the tropics.

Its been a blast and couldnt imagine doing anything else.

Sean

I'm thinking the Island of Dominica.

Sjoconn
05-19-2008, 12:47 PM
I'm thinking the Island of Dominica.


I have heard great things about Dominica, but I am looking at the Philippines. I really do love it down there. and the cost of living is low enough I could actually live off of government retirement!

kpreed
05-19-2008, 01:33 PM
U.S. Army 1972 till 1975. Airborne/Infantry 11B. Last post was 2nd Ranger Co. in North Georgia.

52Styleline
05-19-2008, 04:23 PM
Uncle Sam's Canoe Club, Gulf of Tonkin Yacht Club in other words USN. Started as a lowly Ensign right out of OCS and ended as a lowly Lt. Spent most of my time bobbing around aboard destroyers in various parts of SE Asia. Saw/heard naval guns fired, but to the best of my knowledge, never had anything fired at me so no hero stories to tell.

I loved being underway at sea. I was one of the few sailors who really didn't long for port. I also preferred the smaller ships to the big boys of the line. All of this was a long time ago.

Puyallup Lee
05-20-2008, 11:44 AM
Air Force 1964 -1968
Basic at Lackland AFB, Texas and stayed on for EC&CE (Cryptographic Repair) School.
After Crypto School I was stationed at March AFB (SAC). The 22d Bombardment Wing was assigned to the base. They flew B-52's and KC-135 Stratotankers. I was in communications and my squadron was the 33rd Communications Squadron, which was a detachemnt out of Hickam AFB.

The crypto equipment was kept in a vaulted inclosure in the command post.

I remember comming to work one day and all the guards to the command post, had been changed. General Olds was the base commander and as I understand it, he had a picture of a monkey put on his ID badge. He went in and out of the command post for a week without anyone challenging him, so he had all the guards reassigned.

I worked graveyard shift and slept during the day. It was great for Barracks inspections, the inspection team would open the room door, see someone was sleeping and very quietly close the door and go to the next room.

We had 7 airmen on our shift and we rotated jobs. Four were assigned to playing cards "Hearts", One was assigned to sleep, and Two were assigned to watch the equipment. Basically this was very boring duty.

One day we came in and there was a wooden box on the wall with a grill in front and a small antenna on top. We were told it was a device to detect radiation from the crypto equipment. It was actually a camera and microphone to watch us. We used to joke around and speculate that it was a camera and the guys would flip the bird at it. I wonder what the person who was monitoring us thought. We didn't know, at that time, that one of our team was a Russian Spy.

When the trial was held in Alexandria, Virginia, I received orders to appear as an essential government witness. It came out at the trial that a few of the KC-135 Stratotankers were converted to Airborne Command Posts and the spy gave the Russians the tail numbers of these aircraft. I am sure the Air Force renumbered the whole fleet. The outcome of the trial was that the spy received 30 years at Ft. Leavenworth. If Viet Nam had been a declared war and not a police action, the outcome of the trial would have been much different for the spy. CasaBlancaChuck, what was it like for the spy at the detention center?

I am sorry I wrote a book, but I wanted to tell my story.


Lee

Gaige
05-20-2008, 11:58 AM
Wow... maybe you should consider writing a book! Great story!

Foofoogal
05-20-2008, 12:19 PM
General Olds was the base commander and as I understand it, he had a picture of a monkey put on his ID badge. He went in and out of the command post for a week without anyone challenging him, so he had all the guards reassigned.


This is funny but so scary at the same time.

My dad and uncle were Navy, my 2 brothers in Vietnam were Army, have 6 nephews and 1 niece current military. 2 have had 2 tours in Iraq and one 1 tour. Every single branch including Coast Guard represented proudly.

:eusa_clap :eusa_clap :eusa_clap
Thank you all for serving. Especially the ones in our military keeping me and mine.

For all you newbies. This is the place to hang out. Purty girls and all to help moral. ;)

donCarlos
05-20-2008, 01:00 PM
One question: What led you all to the decision to join the army? Does it bring some benefits for further life in the USA?

For my experience - there is none. If the compulsory 1 or 2 years service was still in effect, I would be recruited this year. Luckily, this was canceled about five years ago. And even though, the only member of our family who was in the army was my grandfather in the beggining of the 50´s. After his training as a wireless operator, he was assigned to the chemical warfare department of the generality and then he was sent to Korea as one of the UN negotiators after the war.

Story
05-20-2008, 01:06 PM
I remember comming to work one day and all the guards to the command post, had been changed. General Olds was the base commander and as I understand it, he had a picture of a monkey put on his ID badge. He went in and out of the command post for a week without anyone challenging him, so he had all the guards reassigned.

Dude, you owe me a new computer screen.

Army nameplates are held on by Velcro now. I have a spare with OBVIOUS on it. :p

No Sir, it's not pronounced that way.. it's a long 'o'.. yes Sir, it's French.



One question: What led you all to the decision to join the army? Does it bring some benefits for further life in the USA?.

Having done about 100 Commander's interviews over the last two years: Some do it for the experience, for traditions' sake or simply to serve their country.

Financial incentives draw most enlistees in whole or part, either with purely cash bonuses or college tuition reimbursement.

Diamondback
05-20-2008, 01:12 PM
Army nameplates are held on by Velcro now. I have a spare with OBVIOUS on it. :p

No Sir, it's not pronounced that way.. it's a long 'o'.. yes Sir, it's French.
And you owe me a new keyboard from snorting Cherry Pepsi all over it...:eek:

Story
05-20-2008, 01:18 PM
Timeless subversive military humor.
http://skippyslist.com/list/

Now, fess up -whose had a troop like this under their command?

Foofoogal
05-20-2008, 01:22 PM
If the compulsory 1 or 2 years service was still in effect, I would be recruited this year.

If or what you do, always, always get it "all " in writing.

Gaige
05-20-2008, 01:26 PM
Timeless subversive military humor.
http://skippyslist.com/list/

Now, fess up -whose had a troop like this under their command?



That is hysterical! lol

Diamondback
05-20-2008, 01:32 PM
Now, fess up -whose had a troop like this under their command?
Well, let's just say that assuming I find a way to get commissioned, if I found Skippy in my platoon, I'd want to make him either a squad-leader or get him kicked up to Platoon Sarge--both take a little wind out of his sails, and help keep morale up from his antics!

Question still stands, but I'd like to add a corollary: anyone seen an officer-ranking equivalent "Company Clown"? (Not like a clueless Colonel Klink, I mean an officer deliberately doing Skippy-stuff...)

carebear
05-20-2008, 11:19 PM
There are an awful lot of Marines on here.

The rest of services may use this thread to support those allegations of vanity. :D

carebear
05-20-2008, 11:26 PM
One question: What led you all to the decision to join the army? Does it bring some benefits for further life in the USA?

For my experience - there is none. If the compulsory 1 or 2 years service was still in effect, I would be recruited this year. Luckily, this was canceled about five years ago. And even though, the only member of our family who was in the army was my grandfather in the beggining of the 50´s. After his training as a wireless operator, he was assigned to the chemical warfare department of the generality and then he was sent to Korea as one of the UN negotiators after the war.

I joined the service because I wanted to serve, like all of my male ancestors.

The Marines in particular because with my vision I couldn't fly and didn't have a degree so I'd be painting the ship, not driving it. So, if I was going to be using my feet, I wanted to be the baddest creature on two legs. I wanted a challenge.

I just got lucky that the only Marine unit in my state was a Recon unit. I ended up with more self-confidence than I planned for. :D

Puyallup Lee
05-21-2008, 01:18 AM
I work swing shift and just got home. It's 12:30 AM and I want to relay a few more experiences I had when I was in the Air Force, before I go to bed.

I remember going back to the barracks after my shift, remember I worked graveyard, and my roommate comming in all upset. Man was he upset!! He was a Radar specalists and had a call in the Command Post that one of the Radar units was not working. He spend all night testing the equipment and everything tested OK, yet he could not get a sweep to appear on the screen. He was frustrated and at the end of his rope when day shift came on. He explained the problem and what all he had done to troubleshoot it to the technician that was comming on duty. The technician looked at the unit a minute, walked over and turned the intensity up on the screen and there was the sweep. My roommate spent the night troubleshooting a piece of equipment that was not broken.

While I was at March AFB, I was dating this girl, who later was to become my wife, and her girl friend was also dating an airman at the base. The other airman's name was Phil and he worked in the Fire Department on one of the crash trucks. One afternoon he was on duty on the flight line in his Fire Truck. He must have really been bored because he fell asleep while smoking a cigarette. He caught the truck on fire. He was OK but after his commander got through with him, then the guys took over and he never did live it down.

One more and I am going to bed. I told you in my previous post that I took care of the Crypto Equipment in the command post. While we were in Tech School, they informed us that if we went over to Viet Nam, we would never be captured. We all thought that was OK, until we found out that everyone going to Viet Nam was issued a Cyanide pill. If capture was iminite, we were instructed to take the little pill. If we refused, then our buddy would shoot us, but we would never be captured!! I don't know how many of you remember the Pueblo Incident when the North Korean's captured the intellagence ship. Only one crew member was lost and official records state he was killed by incomming fire. This crewman happened to be the Crypto Specalist. Enough said!

Well good night everyone, or should I say good morning.

Lee

WH1
05-21-2008, 04:40 AM
There are an awful lot of Marines on here.

Once again proving that all us Gyrenes are men of style, taste and quiet, understated dignity. lol lol lol

The rest of services may use this thread to support those allegations of vanity. :D
What services? There's other services what like the Peace Corps? :rolleyes:

I also joined because it was a family tradition to serve (part of being a citizen). I figured if I was going to put myself in a position to be shot at I wanted the best training possible. I think all will agree that as a service the Marine Corps offers the best "boot camp". When I was a young lad I had read Leon Uris' Battlecry and decided I wanted to be a MARINE.

The Skippy link is a good one. You always need a few like him to keep the perspective real, but god can they be a "leadership challenge", what we call a great field Marine.

My favorite was "Rockin' Rodney". His only stated purpose in the Marine Corps was to be a civilian again. Think Klinger without the dresses. Always did stuff but never bad enough to get in too much trouble. One time he showed up for a Service Alpha inspection wearing Argyle socks. The platoon commander and platoon sergeant felt it was an improvement because as the Platoon Sergeant observed "at least he is wearing socks this time, Sir!"lol

Harp
05-21-2008, 04:50 PM
There are an awful lot of Marines on here.

The rest of services may use this thread to support those allegations of vanity. :D



"We once had a Marine Corps like this."
---USMC Major's comment upon reviewing US Army RANGER battalion. :D

J.B.
05-25-2008, 02:07 AM
RM1, USCG 1963-1968...

Dominican Blockade 5/65
Survivor search Pan American World Airways crash 9/65, top of Chances Peak, Montserrat
Camarioca Boatlift, Cuba, 1965
Countless Search and Rescue ops for distress calls/ships/aircrafts/survivors in the Bermuda Triangle 1964/65
Companion vessel escort voyage for Cutter Eagle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USCGC_Eagle_(WIX-327)) (ex-Horst Wessel)
Three North Atlantic Ocean Station Weather Patrols
Operation Market Time, RVN, CG Squadron Three, ("White Ghosts (http://www.uscg.mil/history/gifs/VTN_SQ3_1A.jpg)" to the VC), 1967-68

Story
05-25-2008, 10:40 AM
RM1, USCG 1963-1968...

Countless Search and Rescue ops for distress calls/ships/aircrafts/survivors in the Bermuda Triangle 1964/65

So.... 100% poor seamanship/flying and/or operator error, or is there something to the tales?

J.B.
05-29-2008, 01:35 AM
So.... 100% poor seamanship/flying and/or operator error, or is there something to the tales?

We may never know... :)

At age 19, I knew everything. And I was a skeptic.

I know much less today. :D There's a case that can be made for either position re: The Triangle, but I think the "best" answer may be Buddha's concept that it's wise to make a proper examination before committing to any belief. His advice basically was: "Do not be led by what you are told. Do not be led by whatever has been handed down from past generations. Do not be led by hearsay or common opinion. Do not be led by what the scriptures say. Do not be led by mere logic. Do not be led by mere deduction or inference. Do not be led by considering only outward appearance. Do not be led by preconceived notions. Do not be led by what seems acceptable or believable. Do not be led by what your teacher tells you is so."

BTW, one of my shipmates had been a close friend of George Sloat, the radio officer aboard the ill-fated Marine Sulphur Queen (http://home.pacbell.net/corwind/Triangle.html).

airforceindy
05-30-2008, 10:48 PM
Cool thread for us GI types. Question: how many of you prior-service fellows still keep your watches on 24-hour time? It's funny, I can't stand to have mine on 12-hour anymore. Brainwashing, I tell you!

SSgt Andrew Worrick
USAF
19 June 2001 - Present
AFSC: 3E071, Electrical Systems Craftsman

Runs in the family...
Dad - USA, 2 tours in 'Nam, Armored (not sure of unit), separated as E-5
His Dad - USA, WW1 and 2, separated as O-3E
His Dad's Dad - USA (all the info I got)
Step-Dad - USAF, '78-'95, Power Production, early retired as E-7
Mom's Dad - USAF, '58-'65, Radio Maintenance, separated as E-4 Buck Sgt.

So far, only one tour to the AOR: A-Stan for 6 months in '04. Last summer got sent on 'vacation' to Honduras for 4.5 months. Hopefully I get Iraq the next go 'round. Everybody's been to Balad but me!

-Andy

carebear
05-31-2008, 12:27 AM
Digital watches are and were all in 24 hour.

Saves math when you're tired.

Mostly wear watches with hands anymore, civilian-side. They can give me navigation tips. :D

DrSpeed
05-31-2008, 12:45 AM
25. Never confuse a Dutch soldier for a French one.

This is easy. Dutch, beret to the right, French, beret to the left.

Furthermore, the Dutch speak Dutch (and usually English, some German, perhaps a bit of French). The French speak French. Unless of course they're Legion, and then they can speak about anything. On second thought it's perhaps better to stick with the beret item ;).

Story
05-31-2008, 05:38 AM
We may never know... :)
At age 19, I knew everything. And I was a skeptic.
I know much less today. :D

Ooooummmm...

Considering how Freak/Rogue waves ( http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/2002/freakwave.shtml ) were considered mere Sea Lore til recently, there's probably logical explanations for the majority of incidents out there.

Cthulhu is a logical explanation, too. :offtopic:

(Never had to mobilize against Godzilla, Mothra or Cloverfield/Cthulhu).

carebear
05-31-2008, 12:21 PM
Ooooummmm...

Considering how Freak/Rogue waves ( http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/2002/freakwave.shtml ) were considered mere Sea Lore til recently, there's probably logical explanations for the majority of incidents out there.

Cthulhu is a logical explanation, too. :offtopic:

(Never had to mobilize against Godzilla, Mothra or Cloverfield/Cthulhu).

Yet.... ;)

Gaige
05-31-2008, 12:26 PM
Interesting article.

drjones
05-31-2008, 01:40 PM
While I myself never served in the military persay....My grandfather was in the Navy and then later in the Army. Perhaps Ill post some pictures ?

DRJONES

Selentino
05-31-2008, 09:58 PM
Air Force 81-85 Security Police, served in the United Kingdom. RAF Bentwaters-Woodbridge. The base famous for the UFO incident in the woods. Loved the Military and the base and the town of Ipswitch.

Hugh Beaumont
05-31-2008, 11:20 PM
1984-1990 1st SOCOM, Fort Bragg as a PSYOP Specialist and Green Beret.

Served proudly under President Reagan.

Those were certainly the days!

Harp
06-03-2008, 03:37 PM
1984-1990 1st SOCOM, Fort Bragg as a PSYOP Specialist and Green Beret.



Hello bro. 5th/12th SF. :)

Widebrim
08-04-2008, 05:18 PM
"We once had a Marine Corps like this."
---USMC Major's comment upon reviewing US Army RANGER battalion. :D


Thanks, Harp, for that quote.:eusa_clap My humble spread sheet:

U.S. Army Reserve, 1986-88, MOS 71Q (Journalist). Basic Combat Training at Ft. Leonard Wood, MO. Granted MOS due to degree.

Transferred California Army National Guard, Infantry. Went to 11B school at Camp Rilea, OR.

Activated for '92 L.A. Riots and '94 Northridge earthquake. Discharged in '94.

Re-enlisted as a Guardsman in late 2001. Called to active federal duty with 3/160 INF, guarding a chemical depot in Utah, 2002...:(

Volunteered and received active-duty orders for Iraq in late 2004. Served with 1/82 Cavalry, 116 BCT, 42 ID just outside of Kirkuk. Duty MOS was 19D; served as Cav Scout and vehicle gunner. Came off active duty late 2005, discharged three months later.

Proud to be a former Soldier, and wouldn't take it back for anything. Still can fit into my original Class As and Dress Blue uniform ("new" Class As for the Army). "This We'll Defend!"

Thanks to all of our FL veterans, and those currently in uniform!:eusa_clap

Widebrim
08-04-2008, 05:32 PM
[QUOTE=donCarlos]One question: What led you all to the decision to join the Army? Does it bring some benefits for further life in the USA?QUOTE]

I did it out of pride and tradition, and a desire to serve my country in a way that only a small percentage actually do. I was a young college grad, and had just broken up with my fiance, so I felt the time had come for me to take the much-awaited plunge. One grandfather was Italian Army, WWI; other grandfather Greek Army, Balkan Wars; one great-uncle Italian Army, Italo-Turkish War and WWI; another great-uncle U.S. Army, WWI (France); my father is a WWII Army Infantry vet (Pacific Theater). So I eventually ended up following in their footsteps. Started out as part-time Guardsman, but ended up serving two active-duty tours, ending up a combat vet in Iraq. Besides the GI Bill and GI Loan, the true benefits are discipline and the ability to be a team player, amongst others. In addition, I learned to never say "It can't be done."

Obob
08-04-2008, 08:36 PM
I just wanna echo what several others have written and say thank you all for serving this country. The fact that each of you people were/are willing to actually give of yourself, to actually make such a commitment in life, even knowing that it might not turn out like you wanted it to, makes you better than me, at least in that regard.

Obob

carter
08-04-2008, 10:55 PM
My Great Uncle served in the US Marine Corps during WWI (I have his discharge papers.)
My Dad served in the US Army Air Corps during WWII (I have his suitcase.)
My Uncle served in the US Navy during the Korean War
My Brother served in the US Navy during the Vietnam War
I served in the US Army during the Vietnam War

U.S. Army - January 1971 - October 1973
Basic - Fort Campbell, KY
AIT - 11C - Fort Polk, LA
Jump School - Ft. Benning, GA
Oveseas - J-3, HQ/UNC, Seoul, Korea
Honorable Discharge - October. 1973 - 11C40

I have the Army to thank for teaching me discipline, giving me responsibility, and some life-long friendships.

President Nixon cancelled all levies to Vietnam the day before we were to leave Oakland. We were asked if we wanted to a. go to Nam, b. return to our last duty station, or c. request another overseas assignment. I requested Germany and came down on orders for the 2nd Infantry Division in South Korea. Figured I was destined for a year as a mortar crew chief. Instead I was pulled out of the mill in-country and assigned to the fun and games group at UN HQ in Seoul. Not bad duty. I even extended for 6 months and was discharged early when I returned to the US.
Seoul was where I first became friends with some seriously hard-drinking Aussies and Brits, drank Bundy Rum, ate dried salt fish as well as vegamite, and saw the movie ZULU which is my all-time favorite 30 years on.
Interesting times and some good memories.

indycop
08-05-2008, 08:33 AM
1986 enlisted in the Army before graduating high school.
1986-1988 1st infantry Division - 1st Bn. 16th Inf.-(Big Red One) in Boeblingen Germany.
1988-1990 10th Mountain Division-3rd Bn.14th Inf.- Ft. Drum New York.
1991 called back to active duty via Western Union for Desert Storm.
I was an 11B Infantryman:D .

Eyemo
08-05-2008, 11:47 AM
Hey Carter, was your Dad based in the Uk during WWII?:)

Story
08-05-2008, 11:52 AM
20+ years Army National Guard, planned on retiring the day after Easter past.
Started as a Tank crewman, now ah iz an occifer.
Armor, Cavalry and now I'm stuck with the Infantry. [huh]
Deployed 04-05 (never you mind where).
I'll be in Baghdad inside of a month. :p

http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2008/01/29/Yellow_080128043714088_wideweb__300x375,1.jpg

Widebrim
08-08-2008, 02:09 PM
20+ years Army National Guard, planned on retiring the day after Easter past.
Started as a Tank crewman, now ah iz an occifer.
Armor, Cavalry and now I'm stuck with the Infantry. [huh]
Deployed 04-05 (never you mind where).
I'll be in Baghdad inside of a month. :p

http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2008/01/29/Yellow_080128043714088_wideweb__300x375,1.jpg

Similar story. I thought I was out of the Guard until 9/11, and then I had to go and re-up.:eusa_doh: Was Infantry for years ("Queen of Battle, follow me!), but then served with the Cavlary in Iraq (Garry Owen!) . But I wouldn't have had it any other way. Hooahhh! God protect you over in Baghdad. (And love that photo from "Ribbon!")

SGT B. (Widebrim)

arthur
08-22-2008, 01:30 AM
I was in the 2/504th abn infantry 82nd abn div. in the early 80's.I would never give up the experience but I sure was glad when it was over.I'm a second generation paratrooper(my dad served in the 82nd abn in the 50's).

Jauntyone
08-22-2008, 03:30 AM
USN
1988-1992
Quartermaster
USS Robert E. Peary
Pearl Harbor

Widebrim
06-20-2009, 09:40 PM
Any more FLers with military background? How about the ladies?

Chas
06-22-2009, 05:12 PM
3 years in the RCNVR - (correct contemporary title: Canadian Armed Forces Maritime Reserve)

My only posting of significance - HMCS QU'APPELLE.

http://i18.ebayimg.com/02/i/001/2d/59/cb4d_1.JPG

airforceindy
06-22-2009, 10:29 PM
USAF
Brat - 5/86-3/95 (step-dad, 3E691, Power Production)
Enlisted - 6/20/01
Training - 3E071, Civil Engineering, Electrical Systems Craftsman
Assigned - Ellsworth AFB, SD 5/02-3/09; Elmendorf AFD, AK 4/09-present
Deployed - Bagram AB, A-Stan 2/04-6/04; JTF-B, Soto Cano AB, Honduras 6/07-10/07

PS: The new uniforms SUCK! Bring back the BDU...

-AFI

airforceindy
06-22-2009, 10:53 PM
One question: What led you all to the decision to join the army? Does it bring some benefits for further life in the USA?

For my experience - there is none. If the compulsory 1 or 2 years service was still in effect, I would be recruited this year. Luckily, this was canceled about five years ago. And even though, the only member of our family who was in the army was my grandfather in the beggining of the 50´s. After his training as a wireless operator, he was assigned to the chemical warfare department of the generality and then he was sent to Korea as one of the UN negotiators after the war.

Two words: Heritage, and Laziness
Father - Enlisted, USA, 'Nam, 2 tours, medical retired at E-5
Step-father - 20 year USAF Power Pro
Paternal Grandfather - USA, infantryman, field commissioned, discharged as O-3
Paternal Great-grandfather - USA, infantryman
Maternal Grandfather - USAF, radio maintenance, airborne commandpost. Forced out 'cause he couldn't make rank in the late '50s.
I was a terrible student in high school; didn't do college entrance exams, made it out of sr. year with C average. I knew enough that if I did college I would waste my time and money and wind up an early alcoholic, so joined the USAF. It was the best thing I ever did, and I have my sights set on being a 1st Sgt by 15 years TIS.

-AFI

Story
06-23-2009, 07:29 AM
PS: The new uniforms SUCK! Bring back the BDU...


http://smilies.vidahost.com/contrib/geno/rofl.gif

RebeccaDoll
06-24-2009, 11:27 AM
Private in Canadian Air Reserve, in North Bay, where the NORAD underground is located (just a deep, deep hole now since they brought it above ground..:( .)

I HATE my uniform, miss the old ones, the really old ones! Currently we are in terrible green relish, cheap jumpsuits, I envy the Americans posted here in Canada, even there fatigues look better than ours.

Tragically, we have photos and posters from the WW1 and 2 all around us, and all the ladies look wonderful with curled hair and red lipstick, let alone the name skirt they got to where. Well, almost all, there are a few photo's of military ladies in issued stockings and 'glamour boots', they ugliest and biggist combat boots I have ever seen.

Widebrim
06-24-2009, 02:56 PM
Rebecca,

agreed, what is it with the airforce going "army" in order to look "operational"??? Don't they know they can be seen wearing CADPAT in garrison?

I did two years in the ROCC, 1989-1991. The bus ride down was fun while it lasted.

I think it's the stark green of our CADPAT that looks odd when compared with the US army version (they copied us). They've gone with a standard greyish-blue, whereas we have the neon green (temperate forest) and tan (desert). Our tans look good.

Thankfully I'm in Ottawa, so it's blues all the way.

Yeah, the U.S. Marine Corps and Army followed your lead (the CADPAT). I never cared much for BDUs, preferred the DCUs we wore in Iraq. ACUs have their fans and detracters, but I'll say this, they do blend in well to their surroundings.

Story
06-25-2009, 07:44 AM
ACUs have their fans and detracters, but I'll say this, they do blend in well to their surroundings.

Depends on the environment you're in, no?
http://www.blackfive.net/photos/uncategorized/2007/04/30/domicilecamo.jpg

ACUs are 'optimized', in that they're the Army's typical catch-all answer.

In North America, at night in the dark scary woods, I've found ACUs stand out compared to BDUs. During this last go-around to Baghdad, the guys who had worn DCUs during their previous deployments generally despised the ACUs.

RebeccaDoll
06-25-2009, 10:26 AM
The CADPAT has its place, but I wish it was not on me - North Bay used to allow the blues and everyone wore them - we are an air force base afterall, we were ordered to switch over to the CADPAT, I can't even wear my Dress Unifrom without permission - even when I had to get my potrait redone. Terrible green. The CADPAT looks awful for office attire, I'm a RMS clerk. Too Army. I envy you in Ottawa Mistercairo, hold onto the blues as long as you can - they look professional and clean, and best of all don't fade after 10 washes. I swear my pants are nearly white now.

Widebrim, I actually didn't know the US copied the CADPAT, what was I thinking.

Story - Ha! For a good few seconds I was trying to figure out why you were photographing your couch, very nice.

Widebrim
06-25-2009, 12:29 PM
Depends on the environment you're in, no?
http://www.blackfive.net/photos/uncategorized/2007/04/30/domicilecamo.jpg

ACUs are 'optimized', in that they're the Army's typical catch-all answer.

In North America, at night in the dark scary woods, I've found ACUs stand out compared to BDUs. During this last go-around to Baghdad, the guys who had worn DCUs during their previous deployments generally despised the ACUs.

Well, I was speaking about them blending in over in Iraq; I didn't think that they would fit in the desert scenario, but they somehow did. However, I'm glad that we were part of the last rotation to wear DCUs, since they just "look" better. The problem is that the U.S. Army is (especially now) so large, that it constantly seeks "catch-all" solutions in order to keep cost down, hence the idea of ACUs as a one-size-fits-all solution.

carebear
06-25-2009, 06:06 PM
I like(d) the woodland MARPats, did well up here (Southcentral Alaska) for summer.

In our ad hoc side-by-side comparisons they beat BDUs hands down.

Opas Coat
06-25-2009, 06:39 PM
409 TFS Cold Lake Alberta... Been in for three years now with 22 to go

We just had Maple Flag, There were allot of other uniform around.

I don't mind the American ones I just wonder why the USAF "cad pat" needs to be grey, and whats with the ball cap? and what exactly are you blending in to?

I can understand its easier and cheaper to keep a standard uniform that many. My dad been in for a wile, I think that of all the tan DEU's look best of all.

How did you manage to shoot yourself???

TraderRic
06-30-2009, 12:00 PM
Hello fellow Loungers!
I've not posted is quite some time, but have lurked now and then.
After college (BA in Music Ed and Performance) in 1992, I served in the Army Band as a Trombonist. My family and I were stationed in Germany; Berlin (1993-95) and Bamberg (1995-97). I traveled extensively throughout Europe and three of my nine children were borne there. Then we went to Ft. Benning, GA and Ft. Hood, TX. Promotions were slow at the time so I applied to Navy Officer Candidate School. I was accepted and was commissioned an Ensign in the Surface Warfare community in 2000. I have been stationed on the USS SUPPLY (AOE-6), USS NASHVILLE (LPD-13), USS WASP (LHD-1), USS GUNSTON HALL (LSD-44) and now on the USS BATAAN (LHD-5). I'm now a Lieutenant (putting on Lieutenant Commander soon) currently deployed and I wish I could tell you where. This may be my last deployment. It's my eighth (3 Army, 5 Navy) and it's time to let the younger ones have a chance (I can retire in 3 years).
I'll read all the other posts when I have more bandwidth. I'll post my adventures in the travel section when I return.
Cheers,
LT Eric W. Sisco, USN
siscoe@lhd5.navy.mil

Story
06-30-2009, 01:43 PM
Well, I was speaking about them blending in over in Iraq; I didn't think that they would fit in the desert scenario, but they somehow did.

I vacilate on their camoflaugity, somehow I think I clashed with my surroundings. CPT Obvious in a sandstorm, April 2009
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l128/Storyforu/CPTSpaulding32.jpg

Vintage moment : yes, that's a 1940 K-98 Mauser. Yes, I did get it papered and lugged it all the way back home for the BN museum.

FinalVestige79
06-30-2009, 02:12 PM
OH MY GOD!!!!! Story that is AWESOME!!! I saw your pic...then I looked at the rifle...and then I saw saw the barrel bands...and the bolt handle and then the note underneath. Wow. I heard about them having M24 Chaffees over there...and some of the militants running around with WWII weapons..MG42s and what not.

tempestbella42
06-30-2009, 03:26 PM
Any more FLers with military background? How about the ladies?

Im sure theres a few others..

I joined HMF in 1993 in our Territorial Army RTC (transport corp) as a chef so on passing out became ACC (Army Catering Corps) which two weeks later became part of the Royal Logistics Corp along with the RTC under the same badge,
Left and rejoined in 1995 with an Infantry regiment (8LI) but as RLC ...ive been a fully qualified chef since 18yr old, and my quals were reconised and needed![huh]
stayed T.A (same as your reserve ) for 2yrs but did several tours with Regular Army Units till 1997 when transfered to regular full time Army,
Served in Bosnia, Northern Ireland (1997),Germany, Norway, Kosava and Cyprus left 4yrs ago to "settle" with now ex after a lot of medical probs....wish id never left!!:eusa_doh:

Djupis
06-30-2009, 03:36 PM
I recently finished my one year of military service in the Royal Norwegian Navy. Interesting year and learned a lot.

Might stay on for a few more years, but I really don't know what to do [huh] Probably I will start studies and see how that goes, or I might rejoin either as an enlisted or perhaps go for officer.

tempestbella42
07-01-2009, 12:42 AM
I recently finished my one year of military service in the Royal Norwegian Navy. Interesting year and learned a lot.

Might stay on for a few more years, but I really don't know what to do [huh] Probably I will start studies and see how that goes, or I might rejoin either as an enlisted or perhaps go for officer.

i was in Norway Lucky enough to start in Oslo and go by ship up the coast..! Great place..Beautiful with really friendly/helpful people. x love to go back
You have National service there, i think it should be brought back here(UK)
:eusa_clap

Djupis
07-01-2009, 01:55 AM
i was in Norway Lucky enough to start in Oslo and go by ship up the coast..! Great place..Beautiful with really friendly/helpful people. x love to go back
You have National service there, i think it should be brought back here(UK)
:eusa_clap

That is a great tour. You should try hiking in the mountains as well, great scenery.

We do yes, but it's only around 1/3 of us that get's drafted after the obligatory tests and health checks you have when you are around 18 years.

Widebrim
07-05-2009, 10:05 PM
I vacilate on their camoflaugity, somehow I think I clashed with my surroundings. CPT Obvious in a sandstorm, April 2009
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l128/Storyforu/CPTSpaulding32.jpg

Vintage moment : yes, that's a 1940 K-98 Mauser. Yes, I did get it papered and lugged it all the way back home for the BN museum.

I don't think you clashed at all, at least not in that surrounding. NICE score on the Mauser; I didn't see anything like that in Iraq, just a lot of AKs. Were you OEF?

El Guapo
07-05-2009, 11:04 PM
There are some military on this board I didn't think there would be, that's pretty cool.

I have been in the Marines for 11 years. I'm a C-130 Engine, Propeller, and Fuel Systems mechanic.

I was going to post pics but looks like I cant. I don't do photobucket, myspace or anything like that. It's kind of stupid but whatever.

PistolPete1969
07-06-2009, 06:50 AM
US Navy active duty 1987-1989.

Active Navy Reserve 1989-1992

Served aboard USS Nimitz (CVN-68) as a flight deck crewman from April 1988-September 1989. 19 months aboard, @ 4 months in port.

I did get to go on a "WestPac" cruise; Hawaii (twice) , Alaska, Thailand, Hong Kong, Singapore, the Phillipines (twice), Korea, all over California. had a great time, but didn't take many pictures.

Pete

JerseyMutt
07-09-2009, 08:48 PM
Active duty Air Force. 28 Apr 99 - Present. Currently a Technical Sergeant (E-6) assigned to Shaw (stands for Stay Here AWhile) AFB in SC where I've been stuck...err...proudly serving :rolleyes: for the last 5 years. Prior to that I did year stints in Korea and NJ and 2 years on the beautiful island of Okinawa. I've also made short trips to Jordan, Oman, Quatar and UAE.

I'm a network and crypto maintenance guy by trade, but have done a little bit everything in the gamut of military communications.

Djupis
07-10-2009, 03:17 AM
I'm a network and crypto maintenance guy by trade, but have done a little bit everything in the gamut of military communications.

Communications is the only way to go ;)

JerseyMutt
07-10-2009, 03:38 AM
Communications is the only way to go ;)

Indeed! The only thing I try to make my folks remember though is that we're merely facilitators of communication. When it comes to communicating amongst our selves, commo folks are the worst. ;)

Diamondback
07-10-2009, 03:37 PM
Communications is the only way to go ;)
Until you're stuck repairing a field-telephone line under fire... which brings to mind a story about George Patton and a lineman up on a pole in North Africa.

Patton: "Isn't your position dangerous?"
Lineman: "Yes sir, but the wire's gotta be fixed!"
Patton: "Doesn't the German fire bother you?"
Lineman: "No sir, but you sure as hell do!"
lol

Djupis
07-10-2009, 03:41 PM
Until you're stuck repairing a field-telephone line under fire...

That's why I'm a radioman :p

Widebrim
07-23-2009, 10:40 AM
Until you're stuck repairing a field-telephone line under fire... which brings to mind a story about George Patton and a lineman up on a pole in North Africa.

Patton: "Isn't your position dangerous?"
Lineman: "Yes sir, but the wire's gotta be fixed!"
Patton: "Doesn't the German fire bother you?"
Lineman: "No sir, but you sure as hell do!"
lol

And knowing something about Patton, he probably got a (private) chuckle out of it.

Story
07-23-2009, 03:18 PM
When it comes to communicating amongst our selves, commo folks are the worst. ;)

http://smilies.vidahost.com/contrib/geno/rofl.gif

LARGE

ORANGE

DRINK

Diamondback
07-23-2009, 04:44 PM
And knowing something about Patton, he probably got a (private) chuckle out of it.
Actually, IIRC he got a laugh out of it on-the-spot.


http://smilies.vidahost.com/contrib/geno/rofl.gif

LARGE

ORANGE

DRINK
Like a water-cooler full of orange-flavor Gatorade?

----------------
Now playing: James Horner - Escobedo's New Friend (http://www.foxytunes.com/artist/james+horner/track/escobedos+new+friend)
via FoxyTunes (http://www.foxytunes.com/signatunes/)

THe Conductor
07-23-2009, 11:32 PM
US Navy 2005-2006; Quartermaster (QM)

Medically Discharged before I even got out of A-School.

Martinis at 8
07-27-2009, 01:17 PM
Yeah, I was in the army. Here ya go. I am seated all the way to the right, second row. Red circle around me, I raccoon'd all the other faces.

http://alatriste.smugmug.com/photos/550891035_L2AE2-S.jpg

Miss Vixen
07-27-2009, 03:45 PM
I served in the United States Marine Corps from 1990-1994. I worked in S1 and the adjutants office. My husband is still active duty Marine, 13 years under his belt, going for 20.

Semper Fi!

Miss Vixen

C-dot
08-09-2009, 04:57 PM
My fiancé is a Corporal in the CDN Forces Reserves, Lorne Scots Regiment, B. Coy, Brampton.

http://i692.photobucket.com/albums/vv290/C-dot_02/n607970330_1162762_7809.jpg

I love this photo - Infantry life is so captured by his facial expression.

sfend002
08-10-2009, 12:50 PM
"My grandmother was 78,
She did side straddle hops through the pearly gates"

"My grandmother was 79,
She had ole JC doubling time"

My favorites.

Viggen
08-26-2009, 09:51 PM
Yeah, I was in the army. Here ya go. I am seated all the way to the right, second row. Red circle around me, I raccoon'd all the other faces.

http://alatriste.smugmug.com/photos/550891035_L2AE2-S.jpg



Which class?

MisterCairo
08-27-2009, 08:38 AM
My fiancé is a Corporal in the CDN Forces Reserves, Lorne Scots Regiment, B. Coy, Brampton.

http://i692.photobucket.com/albums/vv290/C-dot_02/n607970330_1162762_7809.jpg

I love this photo - Infantry life is so captured by his facial expression.

I was in A Coy Oakville in the early 1990s, small world!

Spitfire
08-27-2009, 09:15 AM
I don't have any photos from my time in the army, not because it was so secret that we were not allowed to take any photos.
It was just so boring, that nobody bothered...lol

rosierawhyde
08-27-2009, 09:29 AM
I never left the States. Was in Biloxi, North Dakota and Vegas and was Air Traffic Control my first half, extended and went into Electronic Warfare.

WW2WaltUSMC
10-05-2009, 06:44 PM
Active duty Air Force. 28 Apr 99 - Present. Currently a Technical Sergeant (E-6) assigned to Shaw (stands for Stay Here AWhile) AFB in SC where I've been stuck...err...proudly serving for the last 5 years. Prior to that I did year stints in Korea and NJ and 2 years on the beautiful island of Okinawa. I've also made short trips to Jordan, Oman, Quatar and UAE.
Osan or Kunsan, JerseyMutt? I am Active Duty US Marine Corps, 3 years and 4 months of proud service. I was in Korea for a year as well, down in Pohang. Since I came back Ive been aboard MCAS New River. 6541, Aviation Ordnance. If You Aint ORDNANCE, You Aint ****! It takes one bad motherf***er to act like this!

Roving_Bohemian
08-04-2011, 03:18 PM
While never actually a member of the armed forces I have many relatives throughout the various branches and I have a great appreciation for what you do. I just wanted to take this opportunity to thank all of you brave men and women for the service you have done and are doing to protect this country and all that it stands for.

Aristaeus
08-04-2011, 04:02 PM
U.S.N. active duty from 1984 to 1988, as a Radioman onboard U.S.S. Estocin FFG-15.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v519/NS38th_Aristaeus/U%20S%20S%20Estocin%20FFG%2015/071503.jpg

Reserves from 1989 to 2001, then recalled after 9/11.
Served active duty from 2001 to 2003 at NAS Fallon NV (Top Gun) as military police.

JWS34
08-04-2011, 04:37 PM
I went down to Fort Benning 1987 as 11c (mortar crewman) at the age of 17. After school I went active duty USAF and was stationed at Myrtle Beach AFB from 1989 to 1992. I came home after Desert Storm

Rats Riley
08-04-2011, 04:58 PM
I was a grunt stationed at Ft. Lewis WA from 89 to 92 with the 9th Infantry.

I love my wife and kids, but sometimes I wish I never got out.... However I remember they were asking for volunteers for "peace keeping missions" in Bosnia and Somalia. I know some of the guys were interested, but I had a very VERY bad feeling when we heard more about it.

Shortly after I got home, I remember seeing that pic of one of our rangers being dragged through the streets in Somalia. Something told me right then and there that that could have been me.

Sure I'd be retired by now, but not if I was dead!

Cheers to all those that have served and put up with the best and the worst times we'll ever enjoy and regret at the same time!

Stormy
08-04-2011, 05:00 PM
I was in the USMC from '86-'92. I was in Twenynine Palms and Hawaii.

RichardH
08-04-2011, 05:09 PM
I did my compulsory service in the Norwegian army in 2008 (I was 20yrs old then) , I served as a mortarman in an armoured battalion. Best damn year of my life without a doubt. Right now, I'm about to start college, but to tell you the truth, I'm much more motivated to re-enlist. So I might re-enlist next year, and apply for OCS some time in the future. Civilian life is just too boring! :P

Treetopflyer
08-04-2011, 05:30 PM
Joined the Navy in 1997 and I am still in. I have been stationed in Florida, Rhode Island, Hawaii, Texas, California, Guam and now Virginia. Over all I have enjoyed it. It has its good days and bad. More good than bad, otherwise I would not still be in. The people I work with are top notch. I do not look forward to the day that I have to get a civilian job. Everyone that I talk to that has gotten out says that it is an eye opener.

Yeps
08-04-2011, 06:18 PM
I do not have any military experience, but one of my top choices for my life after graduation would be to audition for the navy chorus (The Sea Chanters).

Renault
08-04-2011, 06:26 PM
Just a peacetime Reserve Marine grunt. '75-'81....... Nothing to write home about..... Except this one time on a ADT Med cruise and we pulled Cinderella libbo in Athens and.................;)

Renault

Rats Riley
08-04-2011, 06:26 PM
Joined the Navy in 1997 and I am still in. I have been stationed in Florida, Rhode Island, Hawaii, Texas, California, Guam and now Virginia. Over all I have enjoyed it. It has its good days and bad. More good than bad, otherwise I would not still be in. The people I work with are top notch. I do not look forward to the day that I have to get a civilian job. Everyone that I talk to that has gotten out says that it is an eye opener.
Then don't do it Treetop. Find a way to stay in or in some way attached. Be it a civilian contract job or something like that. To be honest, the worst part of it is that you will never NEVER find the loyalty and cohesion that you find in the military. Sure there's always a $hitbag who will sandbag and slack-off. But in the civilian world, there are few places where people are willing to pull together and instead look for the first opportunity to step on fingers or stab someone in the back. Unfortunately it tends to be about the dollar sign rather then loyalty and dedication. Even in law enforcement, which I thought would be the last frontier for loyalty and dedication. Even here we have those who will drop dime and eat their own, if it means a promotion.

But all that aside, way to hang in there and do your time. Your service is appreciated!

Rats Riley
08-04-2011, 06:29 PM
I do not have any military experience, but one of my top choices for my life after graduation would be to audition for the navy chorus (The Sea Chanters).
That is actually really sharp!

And don't ever let some ape talk trash about it! You have a talent so use it!

SgtRick
08-04-2011, 08:36 PM
Joined the Marines in 1980 as an Aviation Ordnanceman. Was assigned to VMA 214, the Blacksheep when we were still flying A4's. Found out I could shoot and shot my way onto the Marine Corps Pistol Team and was stationed in Quantico, VA. Went Distinguished with the pistol in 1986. Shot on the team for a couple years and went to the Reserves to shot for them for a couple more years. Did the normal WestPac tours as so on. Enjoyed having Uncle Sam support my very expensive habit of shooting.

scooter
08-04-2011, 11:12 PM
USMC 1972-1994, retired a 1st Sgt with 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, Camp LeJeune, North Carolina. Served everywhere from Israel to Korea, Norway, England, Egypt, Turkey, Spain, France, Japan, Philippines, Okinawa, Portugal, Tunisia. Did a couple Med cruises on the JFK, did a North Atlantic crossing on the Guadalcanal. Cross country skied through Norway and climbed mountains in Korea. Was aboard the Kennedy when we shot down the Libyan jets in the late 80's, was sent off station Beirut when Terry Waite was kidnapped. 3 tours in the Far East, but other than that it was a slow 21 years.

JimWagner
08-05-2011, 04:35 AM
US Navy 1965-1969, aircrew on P2V-7 Neptunes and later on P3-B Orions hunting Russian subs all over the North Atlantic. Was based first in Norfolk, VA and then the squadron moved to Pax River, MD after getting the P3's. Deployed twice to Kevflavik, Iceland with side trips to the Azores, Puerto Rico, Key West and the Virgin Islands.

adouglasmhor
08-05-2011, 06:17 AM
British Army Royal Corps of Signals 1984-1991, Telegraphist and stores accountant by trade.
Yorkshire for Basic and trade
Germany for cold war drunkenness and endless manouvres
Belize short attachment
Cyprus short tour
Northern Ireland - you can guess so I will spare the war stories

Harp
08-05-2011, 08:22 PM
Except this one time on a ADT Med cruise and we pulled Cinderella libbo in Athens and.................;)

Renault

The Glyfada district? Poli orea kirichies and lots of bar fights with the fleet.

Renault
08-05-2011, 08:40 PM
The Glyfada district? Poli orea kirichies and lots of bar fights with the fleet.

I know nothing......... ;) I spent all my spare time in a very nice place in the Plaka,,, yeah, the plaka, that's the place...... I have witnesses.......

Doc Smith
08-08-2011, 09:59 AM
I was in the USAF from 1984-1986, stateside the whole time (McGuire AFB in NJ after basic and advanced training). Learned a trade (aircraft machinist), a little discipline, and that people who wouldn't settle down to doing problem sets and studying for exams could end up cold and/or bored for extensive periods of time. Did me a world of good when I went back to school.

Str8Jacket
12-12-2011, 04:35 PM
1999 - 2006 US Army Reserve, Combat Medic; Leonard Wood E 1/48, Sam Houston C 232 Med Bn, 303d MP Co, TF Gitmo 2002-2003

2007 - Present USMC Active, 0651 Data, Sgt; MAG-31, MEB G-6 2D MEB Afghanistan 2009

amador
12-12-2011, 07:05 PM
On the way out of the service, I had to sign a paper stating that I would not disclose what I did for 81 years. I noted out loud that 81 years seemed like an odd number for silence. The SP4 said "Just sign the papers Sir." Well I have 70 years to go. I hope I make it half way.

HepKitty
12-12-2011, 07:14 PM
I'm nothing but an army brat but I would like to thank all who have served

amador
12-12-2011, 07:52 PM
In a way you also served, as a member of a Military Family. Service members are Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen and are willing to stand in the line of fire. This is a burden on their loved ones. Thank You.

BigFitz
12-13-2011, 01:58 PM
USMC-'85-'89. Wanted to work on aircraft so I "picked" hydraulics. My honest recruiter (so I thought) had me put aircraft maintenance on my enlistment papers. Young, naive me trusted him to guide me in the direction I wanted to go and I ended up a parachute rigger, which is a very lucrative skill to have in civilian life. The only person I blame for this outcome is myself and was one of the lessons I learned in the military, get exactly what you want in writing.

"A" school Lakehurst, NJ, three years stationed in Tustin CA. in various helicopter squadrons where they have lots of parachutes, and 6 months WESTPAC on the USS Belleau Wood where I visited the Philipines, Okinawa, Korea, Hong Kong, Hawaii and Sydney and Brisbane Austrailia.

All in all, no regrets and I'm glad I did it.

samtemporary
12-13-2011, 06:43 PM
USMCR from 1991 to 1998. Boot camp at Parris Island (1st Bn), MOS school and MCT at Camp Lejeune, then a drilling reservist with Co. D, 8th TkBn, Eastover SC through college (USC Columbia), and finally AT TOW Plt/Tank Plt, 8th TkBn, Miami, FL through law school. After 9/11, it took me a while to talk my wife into letting me re-enlist, and in 2005 I re-enlisted in the USMCR, assigned to 4th ANGLICO, West Palm Beach, FL. In 2008 my contract was up, and I enlisted with the USNR - just different side of the same reserve center (NOSC West Palm Beach, FL). My only deployment was to GTMO in 2008. Had a great time, drank a lot, and learned to scuba dive. Still serving and looking forward to retirement in 6 years!

mdove
12-19-2011, 06:00 PM
AD from '67-'69. Had the opportunity to carry an M-60 machine gun. I was the smallest guy in the squad. Got out in '69 and had a small break in service 'til '84. Joined the Guard for tuition waiver program. ARMY NATIONAL GUARD from '84-2008. Combat Engineer in the Guard. No deployments. Instructor for the last 10 years of my career. Taught Instructor Training Courses, NCO Development Courses and Accelerated OCS. It was my privilege, honor and pleasure to serve as long as I did. I retired at age 61 and was the oldest soldier in the OH ARNG when I retired.

Thanks to all for your service and welcome home.

Jaguar66
12-19-2011, 11:08 PM
27 1/2 years combined active duty and reserve USNR 1969-1997 (13 1/2 years of which on active duty), 12 years of AD at Oak Knoll Naval Hospital, Oakland, California, and 12 years reserve time at the same hospital. Base closed in 1996, US Naval Hospital was demolished April 2011. Final rank CAPT MC USNR.
Spent 2 TAD tours on naval ships, 1 week aboard USS Oriskany spring 1972, and 1 week on USS Tarawa's shakedown cruise 1976. Not much call for a Diagnostic Radiologist on a naval vessel. The best times of my life were spent during my Navy career there at Oak Knoll.

ambulatingreader
05-20-2012, 02:14 PM
US Army, enlistee, '67-'70. E-5 11B40. Graduated from 1st class of NCOC "Instant NCO" at Ft. Benning. Served with the 4th Infantry Division in the Central Highlands, 1968, as a rifle company team leader, then as a Recon patrol leader. Came home in one piece. Thanks to all who served, and are serving.