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Thread: What's the difference between a trenchcoat and a duster?

  1. #11
    Bartender Feraud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yohanes
    sorry for bringing up an old thread... but I wonder is a duster, like Driza-bone or something similar in model, suitable for riding motorcycles? I know it won't be suitable if you're racing or riding a sportsbike, but what if you're riding a chopper or touring type of motorcycle, say, HD?
    When riding a cycle, loose clothing gets blown about by the wind. To wear a long jacket on a cycle I would make sure any loose ends are secure.

  2. #12
    I'll Lock Up Fletch's Avatar
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    The definitive duster today is caped over the shoulders and doesn't quite overlap in the lower front, so you have to use the leg straps to keep dry in wind and rain.


    This one's brown cowhide. The cape snaps off.
    Simplicity never goes out of style, and never comes into fashion.

  3. #13
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    Wow, is that leather? Must be quite expensive...

    Umm what about the long coat worn by German soldiers in WW2, particularly the one worn by their motorcycle rider? That's a trenchcoat too right? I wonder if such coat is available now I'm a bike rider myself, and I prefer having a rain protection gear that is faster to prepare rather than the most recommended type currently, a separate rainproof jacket and trousers..oww I hate that!

    That's why I've been thinking about this duster and trench coat type...

  4. #14
    Bartender Feraud's Avatar
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    Not sure what the German motorcyclists were wearing but you can be sure it was heavier than a duster.
    Vintage overcoats are around and modern Drizabones will work fine for the rain.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yohanes
    I prefer having a rain protection gear that is faster to prepare rather than the most recommended type currently, a separate rainproof jacket and trousers...
    You speak as a motorcyclist, and your reasoning makes very good sense. But even for wet weather walking in town many wear short jackets (such as Barbour jackets) over their suits, and then either need overtrousers or get their trousers wet and legs cold. The full length trenchcoat, or the waterproof "mac" are, in your words, "faster to prepare", and in my opinion, smarter and more practical; yet, in the rainy UK, seem to be more and more rarely worn. Another case of fashion's being the enemy of practicality?

  6. #16
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    Thanks for the revive, guys. Great information here as always.

  7. #17
    "A List" Customer zeus36's Avatar
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    I wear an Outback full length duster on my Harley when the mood strikes me, usually in the Spring or Fall, or if I'm wearing a suit to work. When I was doing old west re-enacting and I wanted to cover up my Wyatt Earp outfit on the bike, I figured that the duster would do the trick. I did add several Pull-the-Dot style snaps on the collar and cape areas to reduce the flapping and hold the throat strap from whipping around when not in use.

    I also built a leather harness to place over my hat and strap it to my back. I still use the setup for dressing up to attend a gunshow. As for rain, the duster does nothing for your knees and lower legs. You could wear chaps for that. I have a couple of pair, but found that a Serapi (or Spanish poncho) works better than chaps, rolls up to ride on the handle bars, and is very quick to put on. It is a good match for the duster.

  8. #18
    Familiar Face
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    World leaders love the Aussie Drizabone...


  9. #19
    Incurably Addicted Baron Kurtz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yohanes
    Umm what about the long coat worn by German soldiers in WW2, particularly the one worn by their motorcycle rider? That's a trenchcoat too right? I wonder if such coat is available now I'm a bike rider myself, and I prefer having a rain protection gear that is faster to prepare rather than the most recommended type currently, a separate rainproof jacket and trousers..oww I hate that!
    Quote Originally Posted by Feraud
    Not sure what the German motorcyclists were wearing but you can be sure it was heavier than a duster.
    Vintage overcoats are around and modern Drizabones will work fine for the rain.
    The German (and prob all other) leather motorcycle jackets (the long ones) from the golden era were extremely heavy. The one i own (police motorcycle overcoat from prob early 50s) is a beast. Almost unbelievably heavy.

    Duster, i always thought, referred specifically to a linen number.

    bk
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    http://baronkurtzvintage.wordpress.com/

  10. #20
    I'll Lock Up BellyTank's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Feraud
    Not sure what the German motorcyclists were wearing but you can be sure it was heavier than a duster.
    Well... the Deutsche Afrika Korps used a full length cloth coat for motorcycle riders- a similar patern to their rubberized cloth version but of course, lighter.
    But then a true duster was very lightweight indeed- literally like the dust covers you typically see on furniture in haunted houses... just to keep the (road dust, whilst motoring)dust off.

    Boo!
    Looking with my good ear peeled.

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