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Thread: Classic Hat Makers List

  1. #1
    Practically Family mingoslim's Avatar
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    Classic Hat Makers List

    So . . . Picking up wher the previous thread left off, here is where my research has led, so far . . .

    Now the question is, can any of our Hat Aficionados help fill in the details and correct any errors on this myriad of manufacturers? When were they in business? Where did they operate? What kind of quality did they produce? What styles or innovations were they famous for? . . . Are they still making hats!?!?!

    Ideally we should distinguish between Hat Makers and Hat Sellers . . . For example, house Brands such as Penney's Marathon should be identified as such, and when possible, the actual manufacturer should be noted . . . For example, in the case of J.C. Penneys’ Marathon, Lee was the manufacturer.

    I think we should also distinguish "classic" hat makers from their modern counterparts . . .

    Are you all up to the challenge?


    Classic Manufacturers:

    Adams
    The budget brand of the day, Adam none-the-less made a dependable hat, and made sure that they copied the styles of the most popular hat makers . . .

    Artel Hats

    Bailey
    Founded in 1922 by George Bailey, and still in production.

    Barbisio
    A classic Italian manufacturer, and a competitor of Borsalino. Closed in the 80s.

    Bates
    Edward Bates Ltd of London was founded on Jermyn Street at the turn of the last century, and remains in business today.

    Beaver Brand
    Founded in 1860 in St. Louis, Missouri, and based in New Haven, Missouri since 1928, this manufacturer, Formerly known as Gauss-Hunicke and Langenburg Hat Co is still in operation today.

    Bee Hats
    Originally located on Washington Avenue in downtown St. Louis, but no longer in production as of 2000.

    Biltmore
    Founded in 1917 and still in operation

    Boldt
    Washington D.C.

    Bond

    Borsalino
    A classic Italian manufacturer, still doing business today. The company began in 1857, in Alessandria Italy; when Giuseppe Borsalino set up the first artisan workshop for the production of felt hats.
    When Giuseppe Borsalino died in 1900, his business employed almost a thousand workers and boasted an annual production of one million hats. By 1913 the company employed more than 2500 workers and reached an annual production of more than 2 million hats with its products reaching every corner of the world.

    Bradford

    Brent
    The “house” brand for Montgomery Wards stores . . .

    Brooks Brothers

    Buckley

    Cavalier

    Cavanagh
    One of the premiere hat-makers in the 1920s and 30s, Cavanagh remained a premier hat maker through the 1950s, and made excellent hats into the 60s.

    The company was located in Norwalk, CT, where many of the the high end hatters were located: Knox, Crofut & Knapp, and Dobbs.

    Dobbs and Cavanagh formed Cavanagh-Dobbs in 1928, and added Crofut & Knapp to the fold in 1929. Hat Corporation of America took over the company in 1932.

    Caxton

    Cervo
    Cervo is fine Italian hatter, and has from time to time been contracted by Borsalino to make their felts and hats.

    Champ
    Considered a budget to mid-quality brand by many, Champ made a really nice quality hat, and though they were certainly not top-of-the-line, they had a lot of style!

    Christy's of London
    Founded by Miller Christy in a small courtyard shop off Gracechurch Street in the city of London in 1773, Christy’s is still manufacturing fine quality hats today.

    Churchill
    A line of fine quality hats, the Churchill line was bought out by Resistol in the 1950s, though Resistol continued to produce hats under that name for quite some time.

    Citation

    Courtney

    Crofut & Knapp
    The makers of Knapp Felt Hats in New York City. The company was actually located in Norwalk, CT, where many of the the high end hatters were located, including Knox, Cavanagh, and Dobbs.

    The company merged with Cavanagh-Dobbs in 1929, which was, in turn, taken over by Hat Corporation of America in 1932.

    Disney
    Founded in 1885 in New York City

    Dobbs
    One of the premiere hat-makers in the 1930s and 1940s, and still around today. The company was located in Norwalk, CT, where many of the the high end hatters were located, including Knox, Crofut & Knapp, and Cavanagh.

    Dobbs and Cavanagh formed Cavanagh-Dobbs in 1928, and added Crofut & Knapp to the fold in 1929. Hat Corporation of America took over the company in 1932.

    Duff

    Dunlap
    Merged with Knox in 1918, though they continued to make hats under this brand name.

    Elis

    Empire State

    Etchinson
    This small North Carolina company traced its origins to 1866 but by the 1940s, they were probably getting their hats made through Lee and finished them out with their liners and sweatbands.

    Francato Cappello

    Flechet
    France.

    Foreman & Clark

    Gage

    Gelot

    Guerra
    Another very good Italian hat.

    P. & C. Habig
    Austria.

    Hat Corporation of America (HatCo)
    Founded in the 1930s by John Cavanagh, whose Park Avenue hat shop was among the most prestigious in the United States.

    Hatters Guild

    Imperial

    Hardeman

    Herbert Johnson
    British

    Knox
    One of the premiere hat-makers in the day, along with Dobbs and Cavanagh, Knox positioned their hats as being the best money could buy, and had a knack for exploiting a market with slick advertising.

    The company was located in Norwalk, CT, where many of the the high end hatters were located, including Cavanagh, Crofut & Knapp, and Dobbs.

    Knox was bought out by Byer-Rolnick (Resistol) and eventually became part of HatCo in the 1960s.

    Kristall

    Lamson-Hubbard Co.
    Boston.

    Langenburg (Lion Hats)
    Founded in 1860 Gauss-Hunicke in St. Louis, the Langenburg Hat Co is the forerunner of Beaver Brand hats.

    Largomarsino
    A South American manufacturer in Argentina, the company, still in business today.

    Lee
    Located in the hat-making center at Danbury, CT, Lee was probably the most prolific producer of hats for private labelling . . . such as the economic JC Penney (Marathon) line and such; while their own brand ran from mid-grade to fine quality.

    James Locke & Co.
    British

    Lincoln Bennett & Co.
    British

    Look & Johnson

    MacLachlan

    Mallory
    Owned by the E. A. Mallory Company, Mallory Hats was one of the oldest hat-makers in the United States when the brand was sold to Stetson in 1946.
    The Mallory Factory in Danbury, Conneticut, was in production from 1860 until 1969, when it was sold to the Danbury Hat Company which filed for bankruptcy in 1987.

    Mayser
    Germany.

    Kevin McAndrew

    Manhattan

    Marathon
    Made by Lee for J.C. Penney’s.

    Melton

    Meyer

    Montecristi

    Monterray

    Morfelt

    Mossant
    The Mossant factory was in Bourg-de-Péage, France, and manufactured some of the finest hats in the early decades of the 20th century. The brand was considered the pinaacle in France and but was also well-known in the United States for most of the twentieth century. The company was founded by Charles Mossant in the nineteenth century, and by 1929 more than 2,000 hats a day were being produced; half of them were directly shipped to the U.S. Hat production ended in 1998.

    Optimo

    Palco

    Panizza
    The Panizza Headwear Company is among the oldest companies in Italy, having been manufacturing headwear since 1898.

    Peschel

    Pedigree

    Perfect Hats

    Pilgrim

    Portis

    Puerto Fino
    Founded 50 years ago, this South American manufacturer is in Columbia and is still in business today.

    Resistol
    Founded in Dallas Texas by financier E.R. Byer and hat maker Harry Rolnick in 1927 the firm of Byer-Rolnick produced men's felt hats in Western and Dress stylings, under the newly created brand name "Resistol Hats," meaning to resist-all weather.

    Distribution was limited to Texas and Oklahoma early on, but by the late 1930s was nation-wide. Byer-Rolnick was eventually bought by Hatco in the 1960s.

    Robert Hall

    Rothschild

    Royston

    Rundle & White
    Established in the mid-1800s in Danbury, Conneticut.

    Sarnoff

    Scala
    The brand is now owned by Dorfman-Pacific.

    Schoble
    Frank Schoble & Co was founded in Pennsylvania in the 1880s.

    Scott

    Selco
    Founded in 1898 in Brooklyn, New York, Selco traced its root back to 1799 and the Italian and Czech firm of Selentino. They manufactured hats into the 1950s, and there is still a Selco store in Brooklyn today.

    Stetson, John B.
    John Batterson Stetson was born in East Orange, New Jersey in 1830. His father, Stephen Stetson, was a successful hatter and taught his children the trade. Stetson developed tuberculosis as a young man, and moved west hoping to recover. He first settled in St. Joseph, Missouri, and later moved west following the Gold Rush to California, before finally returning to Philadelphia to try his hand at the hat manufacturing trade.

    Stetson found the eastern hat market difficult, and so turned his attention to the Westerners . . . marketing hats based upon styles he had seen and developed during his own travels. By 1872, he was also marketing dress hats in his own catalog, and by the turn of the twentieth century he had the world's largest hat factory.

    Although John Stetson died in 1906, his company followed men's fashions into the twentieth century, manufacturing top hats, bowlers, homburgs, fedoras, and trilbys, as well as straw hats in both western and dress styles.

    By the early 1950s, there were fewer dress hat wearers, and Stetson has since focused primarily on their western hats.

    Stetson, Stephen
    Of New York.

    Stevens

    Supernatural

    Swann

    Tilly

    Trimble
    Located in Orange, New Jersey, the Trimble Hat Company was a popular hat manufacturing company during the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th century.

    Wasicka's
    of Cudahy, Wisconsin.

    Willoughby

    Wormser
    Wormser was considered a mid-range hat, though several were just as good as any vintage Stetson or Mallory. They had different levels of quality.
    Worth and Worth Founded in 1922.
    Take it easy . . .
    But take it!

    Woody Guthrie

  2. #2
    Head Bartender scotrace's Avatar
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    Just re-found this excellent list, so "bump."
    .

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    .

  3. #3
    Bartender Brad Bowers's Avatar
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    I have some updates/corrections to add:

    Dobbs Hats started in 1908 by John Cavanagh. Unable to get Crofut & Knapp products sold in towns around the country due to franchise restrictions, Cavanagh created the Dobbs brand and hired H. Dewitt Dobbs, manager of the Dunlap store, who lent his name to the new line of hats.

    Cavanagh Hats started by John Cavanagh in 1928, with an exclusive store at 247 Park Avenue in NYC.

    Cavanagh-Dobbs, Inc. formed in 1928 to merge Dobbs, Cavanagh, and Crofut & Knapp. Cavanagh-Dobbs acquired Sunfast Hats, of Danbury, CT in 1928. Acquired F. Berg & Company of Norwalk, CT in 1929.

    Knox and Dunlap were merged with Cavanagh-Dobbs in 1932. Originally to be called the General Hat Company, it quickly became the Hat Corporation of America. Hat Corp. was second in size only to John B. Stetson.

    The Knox factory was located in Brooklyn, NY, with a store on Fifth Avenue.

    Champ was bought out by Hat Corp. in 1956.

    By the mid-1950s, Hat Corp. sold their lines in a similarly-tiered manner as the structure of General Motorsé─˘ vehicles, with Cavanagh being the Cadillac line, Knox being the Oldsmobile, Dobbs, representing the Buick level, and Champ, the Chevrolet line.


    Brad
    Keeping alive the Hatting History of Crofut & Knapp, Dobbs, and Cavanagh since 2004. Visit my blog, The Hatted Professor.
    New website under construction at TheHattedProfessor.com!

  4. #4
    Man of Action Matt Deckard's Avatar
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    Nice... and interesting to see what happened to some of the brands... (what about those commys at Adam hats).
    Looking for my Emma Peel.


    Matt Deckard Apparel
    Deckard's Guide

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  5. #5
    I'll Lock Up carter's Avatar
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    One more update regarding HATCO:

    HATCO currently manufactures the following: Cavanagh, Dobbs, Knox, Mallory, Stetson, and Resistol. Their production facility is located in Garland, TX.
    "Shoulder the sky, my lad, and drink your ale." A.E. Housman

  6. #6
    Man of Action Matt Deckard's Avatar
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    I like to call them Goliath
    Looking for my Emma Peel.


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  7. #7
    Bartender Brad Bowers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mingoslim
    Hat Corporation of America (HatCo)
    Founded in the 1930s by John Cavanagh, whose Park Avenue hat shop was among the most prestigious in the United States.
    Thanks to carter's post above, I just noticed this one and need to correct it. Hat Corporation of America and HatCo/HATCO are not one and the same. HATCO is the corporate descendant of Hat Corp., but there is a convoluted history in between the two companies.

    Brad
    Keeping alive the Hatting History of Crofut & Knapp, Dobbs, and Cavanagh since 2004. Visit my blog, The Hatted Professor.
    New website under construction at TheHattedProfessor.com!

  8. #8
    Incurably Addicted John in Covina's Avatar
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    Pennys

    I was wondering who was the manufacturer of the Marathon / J.C.Pennys / Pennys hats. I have 2 that are well made but will be sent in to be refurbished in 2008.
    Blue Skies!

  9. #9
    I'll Lock Up carter's Avatar
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    I have taken the liberty of putting all the information we have so far in this thread into an Excel Spreadsheet. This makes it easier to make additions/corrections as they come-up. Here's the first pass.

    Classic Manufacturers:

    Adams
    The budget brand of the day, Adam none-the-less made a dependable hat, and made sure that they copied the styles of the most popular hat makers . . .

    Akubra
    Australia

    Artel Hats

    Bailey
    Founded in 1922 by George Bailey, and still in production.

    Barbisio
    A classic Italian manufacturer, and a competitor of Borsalino. Barbisio also was contracted to make Borsalino hats occasionally.Closed in the 80s.

    Bates
    Edward Bates Ltd of London was founded on Jermyn Street at the turn of the last century, and remains in business today.

    Beaver Brand
    Founded in 1860 in St. Louis, Missouri, and based in New Haven, Missouri since 1928, this manufacturer, Formerly known as Gauss-Hunicke and Langenburg Hat Co is still in operation today.

    Bee Hats
    Originally located on Washington Avenue in downtown St. Louis, but no longer in production as of 2000.

    Biltmore
    Canadaian Company founded in 1917 and still in operation

    Boldt
    Washington D.C.

    Bond

    Borsalino
    A classic Italian manufacturer, still doing business today. The company began in 1857, in Alessandria Italy; when Giuseppe Borsalino set up the first artisan workshop for the production of felt hats.
    When Giuseppe Borsalino died in 1900, his business employed almost a thousand workers and boasted an annual production of one million hats. By 1913 the company employed more than 2500 workers and reached an annual production of more than 2 million hats with its products reaching every corner of the world.

    Bradford

    Brent
    The “house” brand for Montgomery Wards stores . . .

    Brooks Brothers

    Buckley

    Cavalier

    Cavanagh
    Cavanagh Hats was started by John Cavanagh in 1928, with an exclusive store at 247 Park Avenue in NYC.
    One of the premiere hat-makers in the 1920s and 30s, Cavanagh remained a premier hat maker through the 1950s, and made excellent hats into the 60s.
    The company was located in Norwalk, CT, where many of the the high end hatters were located: Knox, Crofut & Knapp, and Dobbs.
    Cavanagh introduced the Cavanagh Edge patented 25 February 1913. A second patent, for an improved version of the Cavanagh Edge was granted on May 19, 1931.

    Cavanagh-Dobbs, Inc. formed in 1928 to merge Dobbs and Cavanagh. Cavanagh-Dobbs acquired Sunfast Hats, of Danbury, CT in 1928, Crofut & Knapp in 1929 and F. Berg & Company of Norwalk, CT in 1929. Hat Corporation of America bought the company in 1932.

    Caxton

    Cervo
    Cervo is fine Italian hatter, and has from time to time been contracted by Borsalino to make their felts and hats.

    Champ
    Considered a budget to mid-quality brand by many, Champ made a really nice quality hat, and though they were certainly not top-of-the-line, they had a lot of style! Champ was bought out by Hat Corp. in 1956.

    Christy's of London
    Founded by Miller Christy in a small courtyard shop off Gracechurch Street in the city of London in 1773, Christy’s is still manufacturing fine quality hats today.

    Churchill
    A line of fine quality hats, the Churchill line was bought out by Resistol in the 1950s, though Resistol continued to produce hats under that name for quite some time.

    Citation

    Courtney

    Crofut & Knapp
    The makers of Knapp Felt Hats in New York City. The company was actually located in Norwalk, CT, where many of the the high end hatters were located, including Knox, Cavanagh, and Dobbs.
    The company merged with Cavanagh-Dobbs in 1929, which was, in turn, taken over by Hat Corporation of America in 1932.

    Disney
    Founded in 1885 in New York City

    Dobbs
    Dobbs Hats started in 1908 by John Cavanagh. Unable to get Crofut & Knapp products sold in towns around the country due to franchise restrictions, Cavanagh created the Dobbs brand and hired H. Dewitt Dobbs, manager of the Dunlap store, who lent his name to the new line of hats.
    One of the premiere hat-makers in the 1930s and 1940s, and still around today. The company was located in Norwalk, CT, where many of the the high end hatters were located, including Knox, Crofut & Knapp, and Cavanagh.
    Dobbs and Cavanagh formed Cavanagh-Dobbs in 1928, and added Crofut & Knapp to the fold in 1929. Hat Corporation of America took over the company in 1932.

    Duff

    Dunlap
    Merged with Knox in 1918, though they continued to make hats under this brand name.

    Elis

    Empire State

    Etchinson
    This small North Carolina company traced its origins to 1866 but by the 1940s, they were probably getting their hats made through Lee and finished them out with their liners and sweatbands.

    Francato Cappello

    Flechet
    France.

    Foreman & Clark

    Gage

    Gelot

    Guerra
    Another very good Italian hat.

    P. & C. Habig
    Austria.

    Hat Corporation of America (HatCo)
    Founded in the 1930s by John Cavanagh, whose Park Avenue hat shop was among the most prestigious in the United States.
    Knox and Dunlap were merged with Cavanagh-Dobbs in 1932. Originally to be called the General Hat Company, it quickly became the Hat Corporation of America. Hat Corp. was second in size only to John B. Stetson.
    By the mid-1950s, Hat Corp. sold their lines in a similarly-tiered manner as the structure of General Motors’ vehicles, with Cavanagh being the Cadillac line, Knox being the Oldsmobile, Dobbs, representing the Buick level, and Champ, the Chevrolet line.

    HATCO is the corporate descendant of HatCo. There is a somewhat convoluted history between the two companies.
    HATCO currently manufactures the following: Cavanagh, Dobbs, Knox, Mallory, Stetson, and Resistol. Their production facility is located in Garland, TX.

    Hatters Guild

    Imperial

    Hardeman

    Herbert Johnson
    British

    Huckel
    Germany

    Knox
    One of the premiere hat-makers in the day, along with Dobbs and Cavanagh, Knox positioned their hats as being the best money could buy, and had a knack for exploiting a market with slick advertising.
    The Knox factory was located in Brooklyn, NY, with a store on Fifth Avenue.
    The company was located in Norwalk, CT, where many of the the high end hatters were located, including Cavanagh, Crofut & Knapp, and Dobbs.
    Knox was bought out by Byer-Rolnick (Resistol) and eventually became part of HatCo in the 1960s.

    Kristall

    Lamson-Hubbard Co.
    Boston.

    Langenburg (Lion Hats)
    Founded in 1860 Gauss-Hunicke in St. Louis, the Langenburg Hat Co is the forerunner of Beaver Brand hats.

    Largomarsino
    A South American manufacturer in Argentina, the company, still in business today.

    Lee
    Located in the hat-making center at Danbury, CT, Lee was probably the most prolific producer of hats for private labelling . . . such as the economic JC Penney (Marathon) line and such; while their own brand ran from mid-grade to fine quality.

    James Locke & Co.
    British

    Lincoln Bennett & Co.
    British

    Look & Johnson

    MacLachlan

    Mallory
    Owned by the E. A. Mallory Company, Mallory Hats was one of the oldest hat-makers in the United States when the brand was sold to Stetson in 1946.
    The Mallory Factory in Danbury, Conneticut, was in production from 1860 until 1969, when it was sold to the Danbury Hat Company which filed for bankruptcy in 1987.

    Mayser
    Germany.

    Kevin McAndrew

    Manhattan

    Marathon
    Made by Lee for J.C. Penney’s.

    Melton

    Meyer

    Montecristi

    Monterray

    Morfelt

    Mossant
    The Mossant factory was in Bourg-de-Péage, France, and manufactured some of the finest hats in the early decades of the 20th century. The brand was considered the pinaacle in France and but was also well-known in the United States for most of the twentieth century. The company was founded by Charles Mossant in the nineteenth century, and by 1929 more than 2,000 hats a day were being produced; half of them were directly shipped to the U.S. Mossant produced some hats for Mallory. Hat production ended in 1998.

    Optimo

    Palco

    Panizza
    The Panizza Headwear Company is among the oldest companies in Italy, having been manufacturing headwear since 1898.

    Peschel

    Pedigree

    Perfect Hats

    Pilgrim

    Portis

    Puerto Fino
    Founded 50 years ago, this South American manufacturer is in Columbia and is still in business today.

    Resistol
    Founded in Dallas Texas by financier E.R. Byer and hat maker Harry Rolnick in 1927 the firm of Byer-Rolnick produced men's felt hats in Western and Dress stylings, under the newly created brand name "Resistol Hats," meaning to resist-all weather.

    Distribution was limited to Texas and Oklahoma early on, but by the late 1930s was nation-wide. Byer-Rolnick was eventually bought by Hatco in the 1960s.

    Robert Hall

    Rothschild

    Royston

    Rundle & White
    Established in the mid-1800s in Danbury, Conneticut.

    Sarnoff

    Scala
    The brand is now owned by Dorfman-Pacific.

    Schoble
    Frank Schoble & Co was founded in Pennsylvania in the 1880s.

    Scott

    Selco
    Founded in 1898 in Brooklyn, New York, Selco traced its root back to 1799 and the Italian and Czech firm of Selentino. They manufactured hats into the 1950s, and there is still a Selco store in Brooklyn today.

    Stetson, John B.
    John Batterson Stetson was born in East Orange, New Jersey in 1830. His father, Stephen Stetson, was a successful hatter and taught his children the trade. Stetson developed tuberculosis as a young man, and moved west hoping to recover. He first settled in St. Joseph, Missouri, and later moved west following the Gold Rush to California, before finally returning to Philadelphia to try his hand at the hat manufacturing trade.

    Stetson found the eastern hat market difficult, and so turned his attention to the Westerners . . . marketing hats based upon styles he had seen and developed during his own travels. By 1872, he was also marketing dress hats in his own catalog, and by the turn of the twentieth century he had the world's largest hat factory.

    Although John Stetson died in 1906, his company followed men's fashions into the twentieth century, manufacturing top hats, bowlers, homburgs, fedoras, and trilbys, as well as straw hats in both western and dress styles.

    By the early 1950s, there were fewer dress hat wearers, and Stetson has since focused primarily on their western hats.

    Stetson, Stephen
    Of New York.

    Stevens

    Supernatural

    Swann

    Tilly

    Trimble
    Located in Orange, New Jersey, the Trimble Hat Company was a popular hat manufacturing company during the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th century.

    Wasicka's
    of Cudahy, Wisconsin.

    Willoughby

    Wormser
    Wormser was considered a mid-range hat, though several were just as good as any vintage Stetson or Mallory. They had different levels of quality.

    Worth and Worth Founded in 1922.

    .
    "Shoulder the sky, my lad, and drink your ale." A.E. Housman

  10. #10
    One of the Regulars
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    Here's one that I don't see on your list:

    I have a Dalton, New York, fedora, maybe from the '40s, made of "Genuine Beaver".

    I know nothing about this company, but this hat is very high quality.

    I look on ebay for them, but they are listed very rarely. Anyone have any info on Dalton?
    Lidprop

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