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Thread: On This Day In History....

  1. #41
    Bartender LizzieMaine's Avatar
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    August 29, 1933



    Every Man A King -- but Huey gets crowned.
    The humblest citizen in all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error. -- William Jennings Bryan

  2. #42
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    August 31, 1933

    AL WILLIAMS WON'T ADMIT TO SOCKING HUEY
    by Warren Hall
    New York Daily News, 8/31/33

    That diamond studded crown that may be bought by national subscription for the fistic nemesis of Senator Huey Long rested lightly yesterday on the blonde head of Lieut. Alford J. Williams, as expert a flyer as you'll see in an airplane and as forceful a puncher as you'll find outside a prize ring.

    It rested lightly because the modest young businessman shook it off with a smiling denial of the flattering accusation, thereby becoming a charter member of the I Didn't Sock Huey Society.

    Despite his carefully-worded insistence, the conviction grew that it was none other than the Navy's former champion pilot who let fly a bunch of indignant knuckles in the washroom of the Sands Point Bath Club last Saturday night and inflicted an inch-wide gash over the heavy-lidded orb of the Louisiana Kingfish.

    FLIERS HIT THE CEILING

    Senator Long, it was unanimously agreed by all those interviewed yesterday, was quite obstreperous. But as indignant as the rest of the 600 guests may have been, their dudgeon failed to reach the altitude acquired by members of the flying profession who were present. Three of them, Al Williams, Clarence Chamberlin, and Major J. Nelson Kelly, manager of Floyd Bennett Field, admitted yesterday that they had been in the washroom at "just about" the time the Kingfish got the hook.

    Did they sock him? Of course not! Did they see who did it? Indeed they didn't! But when the results of the triple interview were summed up, there seemed to be just one obvious answer: Al Williams' name is ninth on the list of consecutive conquerors of One-Round Huey Long.

    NEWS TO ME, SAYS AL

    "It's news to me," said Williams over long distance phone from his Pittsburgh desk as vice-president of the Gulf Refining Company. "Furthermore, it's news to me that any of my friends would think such a thing of me." But his voice didn't sound surprised or alarmed, and there wasn't the slightest trace of indignation.

    Williams, 190 pound six-footer, a former Fordham football and baseball ace, is usually good-natured but has a quick temper. Friends recalled the time his car was stopped in front of a trolley in a traffic jam. "Get that car out of the way, you blankety-blank," the motorman roared. Al's wife was with him. He stepped out of the car, hit the motorman just once, and knocked him out, climbed back into the machine, and drove off.

    That's Al Williams.

    IN THE WILLIAMS PARTY

    Guests at the Sands Point affair recall that the Louisiana senator was a member of the Williams party, whenever he calmed his roving instincts long enough to remain in any one group. A group photograph taken just before the festivities started showed Williams and his wife, Gene Buck and Mrs. Buck, Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Mulrooney, Huey Long, and Elaine Hyland.

    But if Williams was slightly unconvincing in his denials, a much more willing would-be hero was uncovered in the person of Police Chief Steve Webber of Port Washington. The chief, who could hardly be described as "retiring," hastened to admit that he not only was at the party, but was one of that select coterie in the washroom just before the lightning struck.

    And was he the man who did the deed?

    "You can say anything you want to, but you also better put in that I denied doing it," he told one interviewer. Later, he told another reporter, "I didn't do it, but I know who did, and he's a mighty good friend of mine. I'd be a rat if I told."

    HE'S A FRIEND OF AL

    Chief Webber, incidentally, is on very friendly terms with Al Williams, whom he knew when he was an Army sergeant attached to Mitchell Field.

    Another member inducted into the I. D. S. H. L. Society yesterday was Bradley Clarke, a young stockbroker of 50 Pine Street. He admitted he was there, that he had plenty of reasons for wanting to sock Huey, but he regretted to say he hadn't done it. "I've seen some offensive persons in my time," said Clarke, "but I don't think I ever saw anyone who could make a complete nuisance of himself in so short a space of time as Huey Long. Everybody wanted to throw him out, but after they found out who he was, they sort of toned down. I didn't know myself until I asked someone."

    "Finally, he sat down at my table, grabbed a bottle, and tried to force a drink on the lady who was with me. Just when I thought I couldn't hold back any longer, he wandered off somewhere else. I didn't see him again until he staggered out of the washroom with blood streaming out of his forehead."
    The humblest citizen in all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error. -- William Jennings Bryan

  3. #43
    Practically Family WH1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LizzieMaine
    AL WILLIAMS WON'T ADMIT TO SOCKING HUEY
    by Warren Hall
    New York Daily News, 8/31/33

    That diamond studded crown that may be bought by national subscription for the fistic nemesis of Senator Huey Long rested lightly yesterday on the blonde head of Lieut. Alford J. Williams, as expert a flyer as you'll see in an airplane and as forceful a puncher as you'll find outside a prize ring.

    It rested lightly because the modest young businessman shook it off with a smiling denial of the flattering accusation, thereby becoming a charter member of the I Didn't Sock Huey Society.

    Despite his carefully-worded insistence, the conviction grew that it was none other than the Navy's former champion pilot who let fly a bunch of indignant knuckles in the washroom of the Sands Point Bath Club last Saturday night and inflicted an inch-wide gash over the heavy-lidded orb of the Louisiana Kingfish.

    FLIERS HIT THE CEILING

    Senator Long, it was unanimously agreed by all those interviewed yesterday, was quite obstreperous. But as indignant as the rest of the 600 guests may have been, their dudgeon failed to reach the altitude acquired by members of the flying profession who were present. Three of them, Al Williams, Clarence Chamberlin, and Major J. Nelson Kelly, manager of Floyd Bennett Field, admitted yesterday that they had been in the washroom at "just about" the time the Kingfish got the hook.

    Did they sock him? Of course not! Did they see who did it? Indeed they didn't! But when the results of the triple interview were summed up, there seemed to be just one obvious answer: Al Williams' name is ninth on the list of consecutive conquerors of One-Round Huey Long.

    NEWS TO ME, SAYS AL

    "It's news to me," said Williams over long distance phone from his Pittsburgh desk as vice-president of the Gulf Refining Company. "Furthermore, it's news to me that any of my friends would think such a thing of me." But his voice didn't sound surprised or alarmed, and there wasn't the slightest trace of indignation.

    Williams, 190 pound six-footer, a former Fordham football and baseball ace, is usually good-natured but has a quick temper. Friends recalled the time his car was stopped in front of a trolley in a traffic jam. "Get that car out of the way, you blankety-blank," the motorman roared. Al's wife was with him. He stepped out of the car, hit the motorman just once, and knocked him out, climbed back into the machine, and drove off.

    That's Al Williams.

    IN THE WILLIAMS PARTY

    Guests at the Sands Point affair recall that the Louisiana senator was a member of the Williams party, whenever he calmed his roving instincts long enough to remain in any one group. A group photograph taken just before the festivities started showed Williams and his wife, Gene Buck and Mrs. Buck, Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Mulrooney, Huey Long, and Elaine Hyland.

    But if Williams was slightly unconvincing in his denials, a much more willing would-be hero was uncovered in the person of Police Chief Steve Webber of Port Washington. The chief, who could hardly be described as "retiring," hastened to admit that he not only was at the party, but was one of that select coterie in the washroom just before the lightning struck.

    And was he the man who did the deed?

    "You can say anything you want to, but you also better put in that I denied doing it," he told one interviewer. Later, he told another reporter, "I didn't do it, but I know who did, and he's a mighty good friend of mine. I'd be a rat if I told."

    HE'S A FRIEND OF AL

    Chief Webber, incidentally, is on very friendly terms with Al Williams, whom he knew when he was an Army sergeant attached to Mitchell Field.

    Another member inducted into the I. D. S. H. L. Society yesterday was Bradley Clarke, a young stockbroker of 50 Pine Street. He admitted he was there, that he had plenty of reasons for wanting to sock Huey, but he regretted to say he hadn't done it. "I've seen some offensive persons in my time," said Clarke, "but I don't think I ever saw anyone who could make a complete nuisance of himself in so short a space of time as Huey Long. Everybody wanted to throw him out, but after they found out who he was, they sort of toned down. I didn't know myself until I asked someone."

    "Finally, he sat down at my table, grabbed a bottle, and tried to force a drink on the lady who was with me. Just when I thought I couldn't hold back any longer, he wandered off somewhere else. I didn't see him again until he staggered out of the washroom with blood streaming out of his forehead."

    Wow interesting news story, but I am most impressed with the use of words such as obstreperous, dudgeon and coterie in a daily news article. If they used high falutin words like that today most young peoples IPhones would explode.
    "The worst of all fears is the fear of living." T.R.
    "Life is conflict, survival and conquest."
    Col. John Boyd

  4. #44
    Bartender LizzieMaine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WH1
    Wow interesting news story, but I am most impressed with the use of words such as obstreperous, dudgeon and coterie in a daily news article. If they used high falutin words like that today most young peoples IPhones would explode.
    Heh -- and keep in mind that the Daily News was a cheap tabloid aimed at the working class.

    The point that I thought was most entertaining was the unspoken assumption that the proper and respectable way to deal with the obstreperous and offensive was to sock them in the moosh. If a sitting US Senator today were to cut up rough and drunk at a party, one could hardly expect the guests to rise to the occasion in such a fitting manner.
    The humblest citizen in all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error. -- William Jennings Bryan

  5. #45
    One Too Many Absinthe_1900's Avatar
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    Why Huey got punched one of the theories :
    http://motac.spaces.live.com/blog/cn...B84E!382.entry


    One evening in 1933, Huey was out with friends at the Sands Point Casino night club on Long Island. With several Sazeracs under his belt, Huey made a spectacle of himself, eating food off other patrons’ plates, dragging women out on to the dance floor, and generally behaving like a dog.

    During a visit to the men’s room, unable to find an empty urinal, Huey proceeded to take aim between the legs of one of the men standing before him. His aim was not the best, and it netted Huey a cut above his eye seen in photos that graced the tabloid newspapers for days.

  6. #46
    Practically Family WH1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Absinthe_1900
    Why Huey got punched one of the theories :
    http://motac.spaces.live.com/blog/cn...B84E!382.entry


    One evening in 1933, Huey was out with friends at the Sands Point Casino night club on Long Island. With several Sazeracs under his belt, Huey made a spectacle of himself, eating food off other patronsí plates, dragging women out on to the dance floor, and generally behaving like a dog.

    During a visit to the menís room, unable to find an empty urinal, Huey proceeded to take aim between the legs of one of the men standing before him. His aim was not the best, and it netted Huey a cut above his eye seen in photos that graced the tabloid newspapers for days.
    AAAAHHHH!! A SEA OF LARRY CRAIG INSPIRED JOKES IS FLOODING MY SENSES. (Self Censoring) Don't want to get tossed from the joint by a bar tender!
    "The worst of all fears is the fear of living." T.R.
    "Life is conflict, survival and conquest."
    Col. John Boyd

  7. #47
    Bartender LizzieMaine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WH1
    AAAAHHHH!! A SEA OF LARRY CRAIG INSPIRED JOKES IS FLOODING MY SENSES. (Self Censoring) Don't want to get tossed from the joint by a bar tender!
    They'll just sock you in the eye, that's all.
    The humblest citizen in all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error. -- William Jennings Bryan

  8. #48
    Practically Family WH1's Avatar
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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by LizzieMaine
    They'll just sock you in the eye, that's all.
    Argyle or cashmere? I know bad, very bad but when in doubt go for the tasteless and the obvious.
    "The worst of all fears is the fear of living." T.R.
    "Life is conflict, survival and conquest."
    Col. John Boyd

  9. #49
    Bartender LizzieMaine's Avatar
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    September 1, 1939

    "War it is, with Germany and Poland fighting a major campaign tonight -- and Great Britain and France about to plunge in.

    "It's a heavyhearted thing tonight to begin the reciting of war bulletins. Today the German command announced an advance all along the line, drives into Poland on three sides, pushing on everywhere -- "lightning advances," Berlin calls it.

    "Warsaw was bombed several times today.

    "London and Paris took simultaneous action. Each instructed its ambassador in Berlin to present Hitler with an ultimatum. If Nazi Germany doesn't draw back at this last moment and recall its armies from Poland, Great Britain and France will intervene in the struggle.

    "Chamberlain declared that Great Britain and Poland were still ready to negotiate when Hitler struck this morning.

    "With war breaking out, Premier Molotiv today addressed the Supreme Soviet, the Communist parliament, and played up that suddenly-discovered comradeship between Stalin and Hitler. He was just as emphatic about it as the Nazi Fuhrer had been earlier in the day.

    "Every American is thinking -- what about ourselves? Will we be drawn in? That question was answered today by President Roosevelt. I think the President was echoing the vast majority of Americans -- let's do all we can to keep out of it! And so long -- until tomorrow."

    --- Lowell Thomas, Sunoco's News Voice Of The Air, NBC Red network, 6:45 pm.
    The humblest citizen in all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error. -- William Jennings Bryan

  10. #50
    I'll Lock Up Fletch's Avatar
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    I sit in one of the dives
    On Fifty-Second Street
    Uncertain and afraid
    As the clever hopes expire
    Of a low dishonest decade:
    Waves of anger and fear
    Circulate over the bright
    And darkened lands of the earth,
    Obsessing our private lives;
    The unmentionable odour of death
    Offends the September night.

    – W. H. Auden
    "September 1, 1939"
    Simplicity never goes out of style, and never comes into fashion.

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