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Thread: Reading on paper or screen

  1. #191
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    [QUOTE=LizzieMaine;1776128]Gad yes. My mother did have a paperback copy of that, which I found hidden under the towels in the kitchen drawer. I live just a couple of towns over from where they filmed the movie, which is still viewed as a point of perverse pride.

    As for Holden Caulfield, another worthy fate for him would be to air-drop him onto the "Lord Of The Flies" island. Let somebody deserving take the rock instead of Piggy.[/QUOTE

    I discovered Peyton Place wedged behind a row of peach cans inside the kitchen pantry.
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    John Knowles' A Separate Peace is a darker examination of adolescence, and while neither Salinger's Holden Caulfield
    nor Knowles' narrator are particularly admirable, ASP made an impression due to its theme of a death-spiked conscience.
    Last edited by Harp; 03-25-2014 at 07:33 AM.
    "The stars are threshed, and the souls are threshed from their husks." ---William Blake

  2. #192
    Bartender LizzieMaine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harp View Post
    John Knowles' A Separate Peace is a darker examination of adolescence, and while neither Salinger's Holden Caulfield
    nor Knowles' narrator are particularly admirable, ASP made an impression due to its theme of a death-spiked conscience.
    We had that one, too. I can't see cordovan shoes without flashbacks.

    What annoyed me most about all these books were that they were about adolescent *boys*, and if girls appeared at all they were as accessories. Don't high school English teachers know any good books about the problems of female adolescence?
    The humblest citizen in all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error. -- William Jennings Bryan

  3. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by LizzieMaine View Post

    What annoyed me most about all these books were that they were about adolescent *boys*, and if girls appeared at all they were as accessories. Don't high school English teachers know any good books about the problems of female adolescence?
    ...I went to an all male prep school , so the literary curriculum was perhaps narrow.
    However, Flaubert's Madame Bovary; Jane Austen's Emma; Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter;
    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte; and her sister Emily's Wuthering Heights all come to mind as suitable.
    I would also add Samuel Richardson's classic Clarissa, The History of a Young Lady; also, George Elliot's Middlemarch.
    "The stars are threshed, and the souls are threshed from their husks." ---William Blake

  4. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harp View Post
    ...I went to an all male prep school , so the literary curriculum was perhaps narrow.
    However, Flaubert's Madame Bovary; Jane Austen's Emma; Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter;
    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte; and her sister Emily's Wuthering Heights all come to mind as suitable.
    I would also add Samuel Richardson's classic Clarissa, The History of a Young Lady; also, George Elliot's Middlemarch.
    Oh yes, we had Bovary and The Scarlet Letter in high school, but it would have been nice to get something 20th Century in there somewhere. Other than "The Bell Jar," which I didn't much like at all.

    I was all ready to recommend "Marjorie Morningstar" to my high school English teacher until I got to the last chapter. What a sellout.
    The humblest citizen in all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error. -- William Jennings Bryan

  5. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by LizzieMaine View Post
    Oh yes, we had Bovary and The Scarlet Letter in high school, but it would have been nice to get something 20th Century in there somewhere. Other than "The Bell Jar," which I didn't much like at all.

    I was all ready to recommend "Marjorie Morningstar" to my high school English teacher until I got to the last chapter. What a sellout.
    Sylvia Plath isn't easy and her Ariel collection amounts to a cry for help. Her poetry and prose might best be avoided except by the hardiest of souls. Herman Wouk was a yarn-spinner with a predictable ending. I did not read Marjorie as a kid, but a Dominican nun whom had an Oxford PhD in Lit recommended Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex over Wouk's masculine attempt at "portraying the Shiksa".
    Last edited by Harp; 03-27-2014 at 08:04 PM.
    "The stars are threshed, and the souls are threshed from their husks." ---William Blake

  6. #196
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    I keep half meaning to read The Bell Jar because some of the characters are relatives of mine. But based on the little skimming I did through Plath's collected journals and her overall reputation, that whole emotional extreme of being so caught up in your own perceptions that you document every little reaction to the most common events just seems so draining. Maybe I'm misinterpreting the little bit I've received.
    Some say he left town under a dark cloud... he always insisted that was just his hat.

  7. #197
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    If she'd been born sixty years later, she'd be a Twitter/Facebook celebrity.

    I think a lot of what she wrote about was very specific to her social class -- there were certain expectations of well-bred middle-class girls in that particular time and place that no doubt felt very oppresssive for those experiencing them. But I was neither well-bred nor middle-class, and had no such expectations to live up to -- so what she saw as a life of frustration, I saw as a life of unearned privilege, and couldn't understand what she was so worked up about. I found her especially irritating and whiny because my mother had herself had a breakdown in the late sixties and had gone thru ECT. Compared to her real-life experiences, which I vividly remembered as I was reading the book, I thought Miss Greenwood was a narcissistic complainer of Caulfieldesque proportions.

    What high school literature needs is the story of an angry post-adolescent girl working in a textile factory. Now that's angst.
    The humblest citizen in all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error. -- William Jennings Bryan

  8. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by LizzieMaine View Post
    I think a lot of what she wrote about was very specific to her social class -- there were certain expectations of well-bred middle-class girls in that particular time and place that no doubt felt very oppresssive for those experiencing them. But I was neither well-bred nor middle-class, and had no such expectations to live up to -- so what she saw as a life of frustration, I saw as a life of unearned privilege, and couldn't understand what she was so worked up about.
    Well, I don't entirely relate to that mindset either and, as I alluded to, this is a branch of my own family tree we're talking about.
    Some say he left town under a dark cloud... he always insisted that was just his hat.

  9. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nobert View Post
    I keep half meaning to read The Bell Jar because some of the characters are relatives of mine. But based on the little skimming I did through Plath's collected journals and her overall reputation, that whole emotional extreme of being so caught up in your own perceptions that you document every little reaction to the most common events just seems so draining. Maybe I'm misinterpreting the little bit I've received.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nobert View Post
    Well, I don't entirely relate to that mindset either and, as I alluded to, this is a branch of my own family tree we're talking about.
    "...her art's immortality is life's disintegration...there is a peculiar, haunting challenge.."
    Robert Lowell, Foreward to Ariel

    Well, you will never know unless you try.
    "The stars are threshed, and the souls are threshed from their husks." ---William Blake

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