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Thread: Reading on paper or screen

  1. #201
    Head Bartender scotrace's Avatar
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    I'm happy to be able to grab some works in digital form, mostly free (out of copyright). Now I have a full collection of Whitman's works, and U.S. Grant's autobiography, and some Edith Wharton, Oscar Wilde and P.G. Wodehouse. I grabbed a copy of Last of the Mohicans to finally read. All in my iBooks collection. But I still find I just don't stick with it. It works for poetry, because you go there and read bits. But digital works don't hold my attention. I forget I'm reading a digital book, maybe because it is an app, rather than a book?
    I've recently finished an Eisenhower bio and The Fault in Our Stars, and am slogging through some of Deitrich Bonhoffer's works and a Dorothy Parker bio (excellent), on paper. Paper books, I read right through. Unless it's Kerouac. Paper or digital, On The Road's fame is a mystery.
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    A sense of the fundamental decencies is parcelled out unequally at birth. - Fitzgerald

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  2. #202
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    Grant's autobiography is extraordinary. Exceptionally well written by a man who staved his soul on Lucifer's pike
    and wrote with a troubled conscience while Death tugged at his sleeve.

    Oscar Wilde's The Artist As Critic features a critique of Whitman titled The Gospel According to Walt Whitman,
    which glimpses Wildean envy similar to that of his Elizabeth Barrtett Browning comment in English Poetesses.

    Edith Wharton's introduction to Ethan Frome should be required grammar school reading.

    Kerouac, agreed. His iconic stature, like Burroughs, is tenuous at best; though the Beats have some rhyme if not reason.
    "The stars are threshed, and the souls are threshed from their husks." ---William Blake

  3. #203
    I'll Lock Up HadleyH's Avatar
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    Oh Lordee above....I have to admit I am reading on both....paper and tablet.... but still buying paper books, I will not stop that!

  4. #204
    Practically Family Matt Crunk's Avatar
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    My wife has a Kindle tablet and enjoys reading that way, but not me. I read a lot online every day, but not when it comes to books. I have to sit down with a printed book in hand to enjoy it. A couple of times when I've downloaded public domain classics for free, I had to print them out to read them. Just couldn't enjoy them any other way.
    Last edited by Matt Crunk; 06-08-2014 at 08:52 PM.
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  5. #205
    "A List" Customer Retro Spectator's Avatar
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    I personally hate everything being digital. Sure it might seem convenient, but it really isn't. Electronics need electricity, in the form of a battery, or a plug. Paper needs nothing. Computers can get infected with malware. Books cannot be infected. Books cannot break, unless torn or hacked up. Books are cheaper. Books are superior.

  6. #206
    Bartender Feraud's Avatar
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    My 20 year old is on summer break from classes.
    Last week he comes home with an arm full of books. Real books, not the digital fluff..
    I'd say he's in the "reading on paper" camp.
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    I'm not a bearded logger but play one on the internets

  7. #207
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harp View Post
    "...her art's immortality is life's disintegration...there is a peculiar, haunting challenge.."
    Robert Lowell, Foreward to Ariel

    Revisiting Ariel this morning; Sylvia Plath vaguely recalls the character of Eustacia Vye from Hardy's The Return of The Native.
    "The stars are threshed, and the souls are threshed from their husks." ---William Blake

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