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Thread: Ok, so some things in the golden era were not too cool...

  1. #1281
    One Too Many Stanley Doble's Avatar
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    filthy, poorly maintained, run down, unpainted hovels. I remember a short story from the twenties about a paint salesman. His business card bore the motto "Hire a good painter - good painters use white lead - white lead lasts".

    Even then, lead was not used in all paints. The more lead, the more expensive the paint. Cheaper houses, or the kitchens and back rooms of expensive houses, would be painted with calcimine, a water based lead free paint.

    The worst would be old houses, once the homes of the rich, that had been redecorated with lead paint several times before being converted to apartments or rooming houses and allowed to deteriorate, with peeling paint on the baseboards. You have to eat the stuff to get the lead. With gas, I thought breathing the exhaust was enough to pick up the lead.
    Last edited by Stanley Doble; 07-09-2014 at 10:34 AM.

  2. #1282
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stanley Doble View Post
    The worst would be old houses, once the homes of the rich, that had been redecorated with lead paint several times before being converted to apartments or rooming houses and allowed to deteriorate, with peeling paint on the baseboards. You have to eat the stuff to get the lead. With gas, I thought breathing the exhaust was enough to pick up the lead.
    Ingestion is the primary exposure route for inorganic lead, such as that found in paint and pigment, but airborn particles from paint are found in almost every environment where lead paint is present. It's especially a problem for children, who engage in hand to mouth contact far more often than adults. Furthermore, for whatever reasons, children absorb lead at a much higher rate than adults. Organic lead, such as the TEL in gas, can be absorbed directly through the skin. One need not even breath the fumes.
    Well buddy when I die throw my body in the back, drive me to the junkyard in my Cadillac

  3. #1283
    Call Me a Cab vitanola's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stanley Doble View Post
    filthy, poorly maintained, run down, unpainted hovels. I remember a short story from the twenties about a paint salesman. His business card bore the motto "Hire a good painter - good painters use white lead - white lead lasts".

    Even then, lead was not used in all paints. The more lead, the more expensive the paint. Cheaper houses, or the kitchens and back rooms of expensive houses, would be painted with calcimine, a water based lead free paint.

    The worst would be old houses, once the homes of the rich, that had been redecorated with lead paint several times before being converted to apartments or rooming houses and allowed to deteriorate, with peeling paint on the baseboards. You have to eat the stuff to get the lead. With gas, I thought breathing the exhaust was enough to pick up the lead.
    Kalsomine was used on plastered walls, and in cellars, but was seldom if ever used on woodwork in the last century, whereas even cheap ready-mixed paint in the post-1915 period
    Had a rather high lead content, as did clear varnishes, which contained Litharge.

    More recent studies of children with high blood lead levels suggest that the principal source of lead is the soil outside these children's homes. Similar soil lead levels are found in the neighborhood of lead refiners (auto battery recyclers), smelting plants, and major highways of the 1950's and 1960's
    My grandfather was a Navy man. In fact he was on the bridge in Manilla Bay when Admiral Dewey gave the immortal order: "You may fire, Gridley, when ready."




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  4. #1284
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    Lead poisoning -- commonly known as "painter's colic" -- was extremely common among "walldogs," the sign painters responsible for the signs seen on brick walls in most every town and city before the 1960s. The paint used in these signs had a very heavy concentration of lead, which absorbed into the bricks as well as into the men who painted the signs -- that absorption into the bricks is the main reason so many of those signs, some well over a century old, are still visible today.
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  5. #1285
    One Too Many HudsonHawk's Avatar
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    Lead is present in relatively minor amounts in the earth's crust, almost all of it as lead sulfide (the mineral "galena"). Pretty much all of the lead in the environment, both organic and inorganic, is a product of human activity.
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  6. #1286
    One Too Many Stanley Doble's Avatar
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    In Europe, experts have traced the downwind signs of ancient Roman lead mines and refineries by the lead in the soil. It can hang around for a long time.

  7. #1287
    "A List" Customer p51's Avatar
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    How about all the plates with markings that contained lead? It was going on into my lifetime, I remember my Mom finding out a Campbell's Soup bowl we had with markings for the company had lead so she made a huge deal about nobody eating out of it (yet, she kept it). As a little kid, of course I didn't understand why. The bowl wasn't old, either. I guess this would have been sometime in the early 70s, probably about 75 or so...
    From this, I can only assume that plenty of fine china from back in the day might contain lead.

  8. #1288
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    Quote Originally Posted by p51 View Post
    How about all the plates with markings that contained lead? It was going on into my lifetime, I remember my Mom finding out a Campbell's Soup bowl we had with markings for the company had lead so she made a huge deal about nobody eating out of it (yet, she kept it). As a little kid, of course I didn't understand why. The bowl wasn't old, either. I guess this would have been sometime in the early 70s, probably about 75 or so...
    From this, I can only assume that plenty of fine china from back in the day might contain lead.
    Yes, most fine porcelain china from back in the day had lead glaze. Unless you eat on it every day, it's likely not an issue, but still, it's there.
    Well buddy when I die throw my body in the back, drive me to the junkyard in my Cadillac

  9. #1289
    One Too Many Stanley Doble's Avatar
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    I heard of a family getting sick from drinking their orange juice out of a pitcher with lead glaze. Apparently the acid in the juice draws the lead out of the glaze or dissolves it. The pitcher was made in Mexico, this was in the 1960s.

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