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Thread: My New Refrigerator

  1. #1
    "A List" Customer The Reno Kid's Avatar
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    My New Refrigerator

    Mrs. Reno Kid and I went to a live auction today and won this little beauty:


    1937 General Electric JB4-39-A Refrigerator


    1937 General Electric JB4-39-A Refrigerator


    It works perfectly and appears to be in nearly showroom condition. It even has all the original accessory trays (including the two original GE-logo ice trays). The only flaws I could find were a couple of very tiny surface dings in the enamel that didn't go through to the metal. For now, we will put it in our dining room and use it for beer, sodas, wine, etc. It will match up nicely with our 1936 Magic Chef 1000 range.
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    I'll Lock Up Lincsong's Avatar
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    Nice. If you don't mind my asking. Around how much does that final bid represent? Higher than $600 but lower than $1000?
    A wife in Vegas?, take my advice, that's like going to China with a sack of rice.

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    I'll Lock Up Touchofevil's Avatar
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    A beauty indeed. Definitely a work of art!

  4. #4
    "A List" Customer The Reno Kid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lincsong View Post
    Nice. If you don't mind my asking. Around how much does that final bid represent? Higher than $600 but lower than $1000?
    Actually, it was higher than $400 and lower than $500...
    That which does not kill me makes me stronger.
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  5. #5
    One of the Regulars Auld Edwardian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Reno Kid View Post
    Mrs. Reno Kid and I went to a live auction today and won this little beauty:


    1937 General Electric JB4-39-A Refrigerator


    1937 General Electric JB4-39-A Refrigerator


    It works perfectly and appears to be in nearly showroom condition. It even has all the original accessory trays (including the two original GE-logo ice trays). The only flaws I could find were a couple of very tiny surface dings in the enamel that didn't go through to the metal. For now, we will put it in our dining room and use it for beer, sodas, wine, etc. It will match up nicely with our 1936 Magic Chef 1000 range.
    What a neat find! The only drawback I can think of is that the older fridges are no where near as efficient as the new ones, so it may end up saying to your electric meter, to quote Captain Kirk, “More power Mr. Scot!”
    The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is.
    Sir Winston Churchill

  6. #6
    Bartender LizzieMaine's Avatar
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    Actually, if the gasket is still supple -- and if it isn't, it's easily replaced -- a pre-1950 refrigerator uses far less power than a modern one, for the simple reason that it doesn't have a defrost cycle, an evaporator fan, an ice maker, a water pump, or any other such power-using accessories. As long as you defrost it when it needs to be defrosted, your light bill should actually go *down* if you replace a modern fridge with a pre-war model.

    The refrigerators that have given "vintage appliances" the reputation of being power hogs are the frost-free models of the sixties and seventies, which were very poorly built and inefficient. The pre-1950 models are a whole 'nother story. (Speaking from experience here -- I've been using a 1945 Kelvinator as my only fridge for the past 25 years.)
    The humblest citizen in all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error. -- William Jennings Bryan

  7. #7
    One of the Regulars Miss Stella's Avatar
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    What an awesome find! Congratulations on having the winning bid!
    "Fashion fades...only style remains the same".
    Coco Chanel

  8. #8
    I'll Lock Up Shangas's Avatar
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    That's a pretty neat fridge. What's that little box thingy on the middle shelf?

  9. #9
    "A List" Customer The Reno Kid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shangas View Post
    That's a pretty neat fridge. What's that little box thingy on the middle shelf?
    It's an enamel vegetable crisper...
    That which does not kill me makes me stronger.
    - Nietsche

    Nietsche is dead.
    - Roger McCarthy

    KWD Radio

  10. #10
    One of the Regulars Auld Edwardian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LizzieMaine View Post
    Actually, if the gasket is still supple -- and if it isn't, it's easily replaced -- a pre-1950 refrigerator uses far less power than a modern one, for the simple reason that it doesn't have a defrost cycle, an evaporator fan, an ice maker, a water pump, or any other such power-using accessories. As long as you defrost it when it needs to be defrosted, your light bill should actually go *down* if you replace a modern fridge with a pre-war model.

    The refrigerators that have given "vintage appliances" the reputation of being power hogs are the frost-free models of the sixties and seventies, which were very poorly built and inefficient. The pre-1950 models are a whole 'nother story. (Speaking from experience here -- I've been using a 1945 Kelvinator as my only fridge for the past 25 years.)
    Thank you for the invaluable information. I was not speaking from the vantage point that you have. My knowledge comes from a friend that had a 1920’s or early 1930’s GE monitor top that he got rid of because it was chewing on the electrons to hard for him. Gleaning from what you have shared, the compressor needed repairing, or something else needed addressing. This makes me want to go looking for one all the more!
    The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is.
    Sir Winston Churchill

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