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Thread: How do you play "Ask Me Another"?

  1. #11
    Bartender LizzieMaine's Avatar
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    Whittier was not from Indiana -- he came from Haverhill, Massachusetts.

    Anyone else want to take a crack before I give the answers? Are you smarter than Anita Loos?
    The humblest citizen in all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error. -- William Jennings Bryan

  2. #12
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    Who painted La Gioconda? ??? - Leonardo da Vinci (La Gioconda is Mona Lisa)

  3. #13
    One of the Regulars normanpitkin's Avatar
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    Didn't peter stuyvesant buy new york ,I seem to recall it said so on the back of the packet?
    Chaplin is obviously the answer ,not lupino laine
    lorna doone written by Blackmore N!OT blackamoor ,this means something else entirely.
    Dropping the pilot ,a famous punch cartoon of Bismarck (the man not the herring,haha) resigning.
    My two cents worth

  4. #14
    Call Me a Cab vitanola's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Espee View Post
    I would say Chaplin rather than Lupino Lane

    I think Coral is the calcium remains of deceased marine organisms

    There was a New York Central (later Amtrak) train named for poet James Whitcomb Riley of Indiana. I don't know if Whittier was from there or not!

    (I'll skip the ones where I like your answers better than the ones I had...)
    I am quite certain that your are correct about Charlie Chaplin. I really hit a clinker with that one.

    Riley! Of course! Whittier did not pen (nor did he record) "Little Orphant Annie". I think that my stupidity may be excused due to local preference, as I live next-door to Will Carelton's home. Good thing I'm not a betting man, or it would be "Over the hill to the Poorhouse" with me.

    At the time the living marine organisms marine organisms were commonly called "Corals", as in the song "Where Corals Lie". even so, your answer is more precise and is probably chore strictly correct.

    As far as the eye drops used by opthamoligists, an evening's reflection suggests that "Atropine" wild be more strictly correct, though it is a Belladona derivative.

    The longest bridge system at the time was indeed the Flagler viaduct, though the longest suspension span was the Benjamin Franklin Bridge in Philadelphia, the longest Cantilever span was the Quebec Bridge, and the longest Arch was th Hell Gate.

    Blackmore, YES! Memory does play tricks with one doesit not?

    I missed the Punch cartoon entirely, though I'm almost embarrasses to so admit.

    Guess I'm no Anita Loos. Of course those who've seen my photograph know this.
    Last edited by vitanola; 02-14-2012 at 11:41 AM.

  5. #15
    I'll Lock Up Fletch's Avatar
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    I'm thinking Peter Minuit bought New Amsterdam and Peter Stuyvesant just was colonial governor. But I might have it backwards.

    However, I am dead sure neither of them was Peter Cooper.

  6. #16
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    I had the same Peter Confusion but I looked it up recently-- I had seen a 1960s photo of a "TISHMAN" high-rise office building and I remembered Stan Freberg's version, where Manhattan is purchased by "Peter Tishman." The real answer is Minuet.
    (On the back of what packet?)
    I suppose in 1927 oil was the biggest U.S. export, but a few years earlier would it have been coal?
    At some point later did it become wheat?

  7. #17
    Bartender LizzieMaine's Avatar
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    Nobody's yet gotten the US export question, so keep cogitating. I'll have the answers tomorrow, to be followed by another set of questions.
    The humblest citizen in all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error. -- William Jennings Bryan

  8. #18
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    I'll throw out Starucca Viaduct for the longest rail bridge.
    Flagler's Key West Extension was a SERIES of bridges.

    Did Ask Me Another come in a flimsy-paper WWII edition?

  9. #19
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    Bismark, not the herring and not a doughnut?

  10. #20
    Call Me a Cab vitanola's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Espee View Post
    I'll throw out Starucca Viaduct for the longest rail bridge.
    Flagler's Key West Extension was a SERIES of bridges.
    Depends upon one's definition of "bridge"

    The Starucca Viaduct would have been eighty years old, and at a thousand or so feet in length would have been long since eclipsed. The Quebec Bridge was about thirty-two hundred feet long, the Benjamin Franklin was nearly three thousand, the Hell Gate's longest clear span was over a thousand feet, the entire structure being over three miles in length. Even the late Kinzua Viaduct was at least double the length of the Starucca structuRe, was it not?

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