Advertisements
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: The man with the pipe and overcoat: Ch Ins Maigret

  1. #1
    Familiar Face
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    U K
    Posts
    64

    The man with the pipe and overcoat: Ch Ins Maigret




    Advertisements
    I'm a fan, as I find the books as very atmospheric. I can follow Maigret around Paris quite easily.

    My partner, though has never read one.

    Any idea of which one would be the best to get (I don't own any at home)?

    Something baased in Paris, and very noir, please.

  2. #2
    I'll Lock Up Two Types's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    4,877
    Quote Originally Posted by the hairy bloke View Post
    I'm a fan, as I find the books as very atmospheric. I can follow Maigret around Paris quite easily.

    My partner, though has never read one.

    Any idea of which one would be the best to get (I don't own any at home)?

    Something baased in Paris, and very noir, please.
    My favourite is 'The Bar on the Seine'. If I remember correctly, it includes scenes in a second hand clothes store and a hat shop. Great stuff. My all time favourite detective. In France they even have cookery books based on his wife's favourite recipes (mostly from Alsace?).

    Also, it's worth reading Simenon's non-Maigret books. They are amazing.
    "I know I believe in nothing, but is my nothing."

    Rank & File: A British Cinema Blog

  3. #3
    Practically Family Salty O'Rourke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    SE Virginia
    Posts
    632
    Quote Originally Posted by Two Types View Post
    My favourite is 'The Bar on the Seine'. If I remember correctly, it includes scenes in a second hand clothes store and a hat shop. Great stuff. My all time favourite detective. In France they even have cookery books based on his wife's favourite recipes (mostly from Alsace?).

    Also, it's worth reading Simenon's non-Maigret books. They are amazing.
    The early Maigret's are superb - look for early 30s publication dates. Maigret and the Yellow Dog is a favorite of mine.

    I second the notion of searching out Simenon's other novels. I especially recommend his short novel The Watchmaker if you can find it; it's set in upstate New York, published in the 1950s while Simenon was living in the US.
    "Well I'm goin' to town buddy; can I bring you somethin' back?
    A pint of good corn liquor and a John B Stetson hat"
    - Muleskinner Blues

  4. #4
    Call Me a Cab Chasseur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    2,445
    The Maigret novels are fun, fast reads that give a nice window to the times.

    As the earlier posters said, Simenon's non-Maigret novels are very different and I often find more enriching reads. Not the light reading of Maigret, but wondeful in a very different ways.

    I've loved almost all of Simenon's work, I highly recommend them.
    Last edited by Chasseur; 12-16-2012 at 06:32 PM.
    "His modest resources meant that he could dress no more than reasonably well, but he did so with a kind of faded elegance that ignored the dictates of fashion... the overall effect was of someone frozen in time, indifferent to the new fashions of the agitated age he was living through. The truth is that he took pleasure in this, for obscure reasons that perhaps even he could not have explained."
    -Arturo Perez-Reverte

  5. #5
    Call Me a Cab LocktownDog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Northern Nevada
    Posts
    2,258
    Quote Originally Posted by Salty O'Rourke View Post
    The early Maigret's are superb - look for early 30s publication dates. Maigret and the Yellow Dog is a favorite of mine.
    I second this. Yellow Dog was really good. But then again, they all were.

  6. #6
    I'll Lock Up Two Types's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    4,877
    I was surprised how much I enjoyed his American novels. I didn't expect Simenon to be able to convey the same sense of emptiness once he moved his settings from the bleakest parts of France and Belgian to the USA. But it worked.

    With the Maigret books, I like the sense of his humanity. He is one of the few literary detectives with a settled home life. His wife is a good character and one gets a sense of the depth of their relationship.

    I would recommend Simenon to everyone.
    "I know I believe in nothing, but is my nothing."

    Rank & File: A British Cinema Blog

  7. #7
    I'll Lock Up Touchofevil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,620
    It's great to see Simenon getting some appreciation, he was and is a great entertainer. As the hairy bloke stated, he is atmospheric. He creates imagery which easily takes you along with Maigret wherever he may be. I would suggest either jumping in blindly or reading in chronological order as either way will surely be a good if not great time.

  8. #8
    I'll Lock Up Two Types's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    4,877
    Great news for Maigret fans: Penguin books are reissuing all 75 of the Maigret novels. They are publishing one each month (over the next six years!).
    "I know I believe in nothing, but is my nothing."

    Rank & File: A British Cinema Blog

  9. #9
    One of the Regulars Alice Blue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Western Massachusetts
    Posts
    131
    Thanks for the tip! Actually these will be entirely new translations rather than a reissue.

  10. #10
    I'll Lock Up Two Types's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    4,877
    My only complaint is that I don't like the use of modern photos on the covers. There are plenty of period photos that would work much better.
    "I know I believe in nothing, but is my nothing."

    Rank & File: A British Cinema Blog

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •