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Thread: Trench Coat - the 'Ultimate' thread (For anyone who dared wear Rick's coat!)

  1. #1421
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    I'm in the market for my first (and hopefully last) trenchcoat and I came across this website. http://www.tailor4less.com/en-us/men...oats/configure



    The trench coat material is 52% cotton & 48% polyester is that any good? It's my understanding they were originally made with wool, is this a quality material for such a coat?

  2. #1422
    Practically Family Doctor Damage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leacock
    I'm in the market for my first (and hopefully last) trenchcoat and I came across this website. http://www.tailor4less.com/en-us/men...oats/configure

    The trench coat material is 52% cotton & 48% polyester is that any good? It's my understanding they were originally made with wool, is this a quality material for such a coat?
    Trench coats can be made from anything, but as I understand it the original ones used in the trenches of WW1 were cotton with a removable wool liner, like most classic trench coats. The cotton/poly blend is more modern, but in my opinion it helps reduce wear and helps with water repellency. Of course, the original coats were made from a tightly woven 100% cotton in a weight which you can't really get today. So a blend is a good modern compromise.
    "Do you need more oil, or are you greased up enough, honey?" - Sonny Crockett

  3. #1423
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Damage View Post
    Trench coats can be made from anything, but as I understand it the original ones used in the trenches of WW1 were cotton with a removable wool liner, like most classic trench coats. The cotton/poly blend is more modern, but in my opinion it helps reduce wear and helps with water repellency. Of course, the original coats were made from a tightly woven 100% cotton in a weight which you can't really get today. So a blend is a good modern compromise.
    Thank you for the advice. That is good to know.

  4. #1424
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    Actually would anyone have recommendations on trenchcoat sellers, particularly to Canada? Having looked more deeply into Tailor4Less they seem to have a somewhat unfortunate reputation quality assurance wise.

    I also realised that I probably don't need a made to measure overcoat that much, as all I need is a long XL that is rigidly formulaic and stereotypical, I just want a conventional trenchcoat and off the rack would probably be cheaper.

    Sorry if anyone has posted such information in the thread already, it is a rather long one!

  5. #1425
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    David Farrar in Freida (1947)


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    Rank & File: A British Cinema Blog

  6. #1426
    Practically Family Doctor Damage's Avatar
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    "Do you need more oil, or are you greased up enough, honey?" - Sonny Crockett

  7. #1427
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    1930's Dresden. Click to enlarge.



    http://www.deutschefotothek.de/documents/obj/87506780

    Leipzig 1954 - the 1000th trenchcoat made from rayon ("Zellwolle") by "Policke & Wunder".



    http://www.deutschefotothek.de/documents/obj/88904265

    Leipzig 1953 - trenchcoat by the VEB Bekleidung ("people-owned factory - clothing") Leipzig.



    http://www.deutschefotothek.de/documents/obj/88896745
    Last edited by Fastuni; 11-22-2014 at 12:00 PM.

  8. #1428
    I'll Lock Up Two Types's Avatar
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    Now you just need to find me a raincoat like that, complete with VEB label.
    "I know I believe in nothing, but is my nothing."

    Rank & File: A British Cinema Blog

  9. #1429
    One Too Many Fastuni's Avatar
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    If it comes across you'll know it!
    Indeed I found a perfect German trenchcoat (50's) recently - but from Bavaria and my size 40.
    Photos come soon.
    Last edited by Fastuni; 11-22-2014 at 02:56 PM.

  10. #1430
    New In Town one2rock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Damage View Post
    Trench coats can be made from anything, but as I understand it the original ones used in the trenches of WW1 were cotton with a removable wool liner, like most classic trench coats. The cotton/poly blend is more modern, but in my opinion it helps reduce wear and helps with water repellency. Of course, the original coats were made from a tightly woven 100% cotton in a weight which you can't really get today. So a blend is a good modern compromise.

    Hi,

    I have a question regarding Grenfell trench coats.

    It is my understanding that the Grenfell cloth was a tightly woven gabardine made from 600 thread-per-inch Egyptian cotton. Some have stated that the cloth was even more tightly woven than Burberry's. I have seen a few Grenfell trench coats in 100% cotton on eBay which were labeled "GRENFELL MAJER Made in England". Are these coats made from Grenfell cloth or is the mountain climber label specifically stating "Made from GRENFELL cloth" required?

    I believe that MAJER Clothing is an American clothing brand.

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