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German magazine scans 1930s

Discussion in 'Suits' started by Flat Foot Floey, Nov 9, 2010.

  1. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Hello

    I scanned some magazines and would like to share them with you. The first few are from "Der Schneidermeister"(The Tailor) 1938
    If you like them I can scan some more.

    Florian

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    Last edited: Nov 10, 2010
  2. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

    some overcoats:
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  3. I think we'd all like to see some more, Florian. Thank you so much.
     
  4. Flo, these are some great scans! Bugsy is right: if there is more - please let us have it.

    Looking at all those great suits make me a little sad, considering that not many have survived WWII. They burn so easily... :(
     
  5. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Hm yeah. But burned suits where the smallest tragedy. It is sad that the peak of mens fashion takes place in the same period as the rupture in civilisation. It takes a bitter note even to things like that. The magazine has some pages with uniforms too. Of course I leave them out. (I don't even like reenactment)
    Interesting enough there are some pages that mention english fashion or english fabrics. Even then they couldn't deny the satorial influence of the british tailors on menswear.

    Well here are the next scans:
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  6. Michael Carter

    Michael Carter One of the Regulars

    I'd be interested in seeing the uniforms too. I know many officers had privately made and tailored uniforms for those that could afford to do so, as well as off-the-rack from different clothiers.
     
  7. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Last edited: Nov 10, 2010
  8. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Hello Michael,
    I didn't scan these pages. I don't want to. No offense to people with an historical interest in militaria. But I don't feel well because there are some black sheep who like to dress up in uniforms for "fun". I just don't want to have anything to do with it and don't help them. Thank you for your understanding.

    Florian
     
  9. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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  10. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

    The best page is this one. It has a detailed description of a suit in the fashion of spring / summer 1938.
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    Suit 1938

    I'll try to make a translation soon. If you are impatient, try to translate this with google or something:
     
  11. Undertow

    Undertow My Mail is Forwarded Here

    I can certainly understand your feelings on this and I would support your decision to censor some of the pics. However, I will note how timeless these styles are regardless to their country of origin. Sharp pictures, thanks for sharing!
     
  12. Great stuff FFF - great thanx for sharing it.
    I can understand FFF's reluctance to post uniforms publicly - in Germany it is actually against the law to do such things, IIRC.

    Looking at the styles, I don't see much that is characteristically German to my eyes (going by old films and photos ;) ) besides the more busily-tailored sport coats with button pockets, self-belts and such, giving a nod to the Tracht or regional costumery.

    The other thing that strikes me is the peak lapel SB was still popular on the Continent. It had gone out of the mainstream in the US about 1934, when the English drape arrived here in a big way. The drape shaped peak SB is very characteristically English or European - I think it was too "Cary Grantish" for the popular buyer.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2010
  13. wahine

    wahine Practically Family

    These are great impressions, thank you for sharing!
    Are there any patterns in the magazines as well? I got some German mid 50s men's tailoring magazines, but unfortunately they don't have patterns - just some descriptions like the ones you posted.
    I'd like to make something for my man once (in time far, far from today, since I'll need much better tailoring skills).
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2010
  14. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

    Thanks for the effort!

    I love this stuff.
     
  15. These are great. Very much like Montague Burton illustrations of the era. I have some German scans around here somewheres that Shaul-Ike Cohen sent me a while ago. Difficult to censor though …* I remember the text on almost every page ending "Und … Heil Hitler!". I thought it quite weird that even menswear catalogues were so fearful that they had to print such gratuitous suckhole statements.[huh]

    bk
     
  16. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Unfortunaly there are no patterns. Some suits have numbers to order the patterns. Often the articles deal with certain problems (like a costumer with round shoulders) or focus on aspects that are different to the fashion of the year before. Sometimes they include technical drawings but no ready to use patterns.

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  17. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

    here they compare dinner jackets with different buttoning. the one on the right is described as the newest model in 1938 , the first is from spring 1937 and the one in the middle from fall 1937.
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    page to order the pattern
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    Last edited: Nov 10, 2010
  18. wahine

    wahine Practically Family

    Wow, thanks a lot for the effort!
    It seems pretty much like the magazines I have (called "Rundschau - Deutsches Schneiderfachblatt"), only that mine don't even have the offer to order patterns. Not that I'd make any difference for us today.
    Probably to a tailor, the small sketches and the information will be enough to remake such a suit. I don't even understand some of the words used (Klappenbruch? wheew).
     
  19. I assumed tailoring was a particularly Jewish industry, one that had been ethnically cleansed by '38, but was still anxious to avoid further associations to Jews.
     

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