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"Vintage" foods that are still with us today.

Discussion in 'The Connoisseur' started by Maj.Nick Danger, Aug 18, 2006.

  1. These from The Ladies' Home Journal, July 1944,... with recipes! I was surprised that I recognized most of the brands that were advertised.


    Who could resist a yummy entree of Spam?
  2. This is still around of course.


    An exciting recipe,...

  3. This one reminds me of an ad from the 70's.

    Something about the artwork.

  4. A day without this is like,...

    ...well, you know.

  5. Get it all here.


    And have dinner in your modern dining room. (Can't say as I care for this decor, though.) :eek:

  6. Serial Hero

    Serial Hero A-List Customer

    If you check the fridge in the office I work at you will find all kinds of “vintage” food.:eek:
  7. mysterygal

    mysterygal Call Me a Cab

    lol ....even pictures with spam grosses me out
  8. ledsled

    ledsled One of the Regulars


    People reading this thread might like reading the recipes that arrive in an electronic newsletter sent out by an antique website.

    I think the website is: www.tias.com

    If you sign up for the newsletter, every one has a recipe towards the bottom of it. Some of them are quite interesting, as the people posting the recipe usually include the origin of it.
  9. ledsled

    ledsled One of the Regulars

    Turkey leftovers

    Your comment reminds me of Thanksgiving leftovers. My father would dig out a meat grinder and make "turkey spread". As he got older, his turkey spread became more exciting... and dangerous for consumption. You could measure the progress of his senility by how many unidentifiable things things would get ground up!
  10. book_lover

    book_lover Familiar Face

    ooooh nooo!!

    noone mentioned coca cola? that's vintage, surely?

    Here in the UK we have Gentleman's relish - has anchovies in it....

    What about Marmite? That's vintage I think. Tomato ketchup? Here it is "Heinz" which is (and I think, has always been) the market leader.

    Spam - bleurgh!
  11. green papaya

    green papaya Practically Family

    pork rinds, available at most Mexican food markets, these are the authentic deep fried pork rinds "Chicharrones" good old fashioned artery clogging delights!



    and Mexican style pasteries

    tastes like old fashioned bakery food


    fried chicken dinners were very popular back in the golden era, and are still just as popular now as they were back then.



    whole roast pigs
  12. book_lover

    book_lover Familiar Face

    Because they are so fiiiiine! This will be the first thing I try if I ever get to America. I bet you get better than KFC which is the best we can do round here.
  13. fortworthgal

    fortworthgal Call Me a Cab

    I love Mexican pastries! They are quite popular here and my coworkers bring them into the office weekly. They always come in such odd colors and flavors - bright pink, yellow, seafoam green... pumpkin, papaya, etc.
  14. Haversack

    Haversack Practically Family

    It is worth keeping in mind that during the Golden Age, chicken was not the cheap meat it has become today. (in both the economic and quality sense). It was a special treat to have chicken for dinner. The old expression of "chicken every Sunday" was a way of saying you were doing well.

  15. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

    Where did beef rank?
  16. Barry

    Barry Practically Family

    Ok, I'm really bored today... So I referred to the 1942 edition of Statistical Abstracts.

    Retail Prices of Food

    No. 403. - Prices, average Retail, of Principal Articles of Food 1924 to 1942.
    Note: Pries in cents per pound.

    Looks to me like chicken might have been the #2 most expensive meat listed during a number of years. Round steak was by far the most expensive meat listed. Chuck roast was not very expensive. Also, after 1929, the price of a leg of lamb dropped off big time...

  17. [​IMG]
  18. I dug up a few more familiar brand's ads.

    This one's nice and colorful. From the February 1941 issue of "Woman's Home Companion".


    A little celebrity endorsement never hurt either.

  19. Here's one I've never heard of. Maybe, (thankfully) this one fell by the wayside.

    It's Prem!


    Must have been too much competition from that other more notable canned, uhhm,... "meat" product.
  20. Tony in Tarzana

    Tony in Tarzana My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Mmmm... sugar 'n pork!

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