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WWII/old-fashioned military slang for passing gas.

Discussion in 'WWII' started by Ticklishchap, Dec 16, 2012.

  1. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom Practically Family

    My dad (Born 1921) used to call 'em "zombies". One of his signature comic tag lines was "Boss! Boss! I smell a Zombie!", which he got from --I believe (?)-- an old Jack Benny & Rochester movie.

    I still get the giggles whenever I hear the modern phrase "Zombie Apocalypse". To me it conjures up images of the world ending in a somewhat different way. :p
     
    Ticklishchap likes this.
  2. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap Practically Family

    I like it and might adopt it, with your permission.
     
  3. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap Practically Family

    An elderly gentleman born 1911 (died 2005) with whom I often used to take tea used the words 'guffle' and 'flatulate'. He would talk openly and frequently about his emissions and as he was a very serious and even humourless person and otherwise very correct and proper, the effect was hilarious.
    I, in turn, like using the made-up words fartulent and fartulated. 'I'm afraid I've just fartulated' or 'this curry has made me extremely fartulent'. It's a good merger of the demotic and technical terms.
     
  4. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap Practically Family

    machine gun n rapid succession of ballistic farts

    B.P n Bad Patrol - from the gas generated by fear during military combat

    Rapid Fire n repeat action, high velocity, as used by the Royal Marines

    ripsnorter v Very loud fart, large quantity of gaseous emmisions
     
  5. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    Did someone step on a duck?

    Wind or windiness was the usual euphemism in England. I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned.
     
    scottyrocks likes this.
  6. STEVIEBOY1

    STEVIEBOY1 Practically Family

    Yes, I think Cauliflower , Brussels Sprouts both of which I quite like infact, also have that effect, as do baked beans!
     
    scottyrocks likes this.
  7. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap Practically Family

    It looks as if a recipe book is required
     
  8. STEVIEBOY1

    STEVIEBOY1 Practically Family

    Yes, quite. !
     
  9. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap Practically Family

    It is supposed to be extremely good for the health.
     
  10. STEVIEBOY1

    STEVIEBOY1 Practically Family

  11. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap Practically Family

    This subject remains intrinsically funny even years after other forms of schoolboy humour have long been forgotten.
    At a personal level, I associate it with Corps at school and university, and with a series of particularly boring undergraduate lectures which I would enliven in this way. However I think that it was Geography lessons where my farting techniques were refined - in fact I cannot think about that subject without thinking about farting.
     
  12. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap Practically Family

    I can add another one to that: onion soup.
     
  13. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap Practically Family

    B.P n Bad Patrol - from the gas generated by fear during military combat.
     


  14. "The First International Crepitation Contest," featuring Sidney S. Brown of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, recorded in 1946.
     
  15. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap Practically Family

    Falme-thrower is another military term I heard recently.
     
  16. STEVIEBOY1

    STEVIEBOY1 Practically Family

    Or pehaps FLAME Thrower maybe? :rolleyes: Anyway very good. ;)
     
  17. GHT

    GHT My Mail is Forwarded Here

     
    Ticklishchap likes this.
  18. GHT

    GHT My Mail is Forwarded Here

    My Grandfather had no "fart shame." He would lift one buttock or the other, let one go and say: "Where 'ere you be, let your wind go free." Grandmother, would get quite annoyed, but she always defended him. "Oh you know Granddad and his botty burps," was her favourite remark.
     

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