20's/30's contrasting trousers

Discussion in 'Suits' started by volvomeister13, Apr 14, 2015.

  1. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,022
    Location:
    East Sussex, England
    i very much doubt those trousers are 20s as the seller claims, and the 2nd pair appear to be cotton twill or gabardine rather than flannel.
     
  2. Rabbit

    Rabbit Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,454
    Location:
    Germany
    I thought the same thing. One of the trousers look like flannel all right, another one is cotton twill, and the third is either the same or a cotton in plain weave, and looks too thin for flannel. Too bad there's no closeup. Twill/gabardine and flannel alike are 2x1 weaves.
     
  3. Claudio

    Claudio Vendor

    Messages:
    377
    Location:
    Italian living in Spain
    if you decide to make them cream flannel make sure the fabric weave is sturdy and heavy enough so that it isnt see through. The thing is it then defies the use of cream flannels (spring-summer colour surely) if they are too heavy.

    I have just made a trial pair for myself with 12.3oz and struggled with the transparency. I wear them now in spring but as soon as summer kicks in it will be difficult (for south Europe at least) tumblr_njpbkwZWCt1qe5226o1_1280.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2015
  4. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,022
    Location:
    East Sussex, England
    those look good Claudio.

    i see the cream flannel as a trouser for cool, breezy spring & summer days (which we get a lot of in the UK). when the weather gets hot and humid i ditch the wool altogether.
     
  5. Claudio

    Claudio Vendor

    Messages:
    377
    Location:
    Italian living in Spain
    Thanks. Don't look see through on picture but pocket pouches visible in reality. I dont mind this mind you but just giving a heads up. Yes indeed great for your weather up north.

    Canvas, gaberdine would work better but then loose the beauty of flannel.
     
  6. Papperskatt

    Papperskatt Practically Family

    Messages:
    506
    Location:
    Sweden
    I don't really agree that flannels aren't wearable in the summer heat. I've got a pair of cream flannels, probably 30s but I'm not really sure, that I use all summer.

    Sure, I live in the northern part of Sweden which isn't exactly known for it's warm climate, but for about a week in July last year my area was actually the hottest place in Europe! Hotter than both Italy and Spain. :eeek: While it was too hot for a jacket, I was still able to rock my flannels. :cool:
     
  7. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,022
    Location:
    East Sussex, England
    Pappz, i'm happy to hear that. the more people say "i can wear heavy wool in summer" the more we can dispel the myth that men like soft, lightweight wool fabrics. ;)

    what weight are the trousers in question ?
     
  8. Rabbit

    Rabbit Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,454
    Location:
    Germany
    If you live near the sea, with a more or less constant breeze, you can actually enjoy wearing heavy wool in the heat - even when the landmass has heated up over the course of the season. But when the air isn't moving... over here in southwestern Germany, far away from any ocean, there is usually a period of several weeks each summer where nothing but linen and possibly cotton seems to work for me.
     
  9. Papperskatt

    Papperskatt Practically Family

    Messages:
    506
    Location:
    Sweden
    I don't really know how to check that.
     
  10. Claudio

    Claudio Vendor

    Messages:
    377
    Location:
    Italian living in Spain
    I don't wear linen in winter like I don't wear heavy wools in summer. I dont' want to be cold in winter and warm in summer. Like not wearing a Panama, spectators and seersucker in winter. Think there are basics that usually need to be respected as to not look too 'forced'. That said surely it all depends on your climate and environment.
    WHite flannels (heavyweigth) will look fine un Uppsala in August but not so in Sorrento at mid day, mAybe for a visiting tourist. However white flannels as I initially stated is an overlapping thing, and can indeed work both ways, depending.

    How about what shoes to wear with white flannels? can't help thinking these shout of for some form of white footwear (bucks, spectators, brogues, loafers ..). Dunno ...
     
  11. Rabbit

    Rabbit Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,454
    Location:
    Germany
    Spectators with off-white buckskin, whether laced or in the shape of loafers, were primarily designed for wear with very light-colored trousers which are otherwise a challenge for footwear. Then white bucks, of course, and you can get away with tan shoes if you like the combination, especially tan loafers.
    Plain chestnut, dark brown and black are progressively unattractive shoe colors under cream flannels.
    Nothing new here, I suppose.
     
  12. Claudio

    Claudio Vendor

    Messages:
    377
    Location:
    Italian living in Spain
    Apologies, had thought I had seen dark shoes in one of those period photos posted up earlier, but they were indeed pinstripes white trousers and not white/cream flannels. My mistake.
    No doubt off white, light tan at most, I see as only acceptable colour of shoes.
     
  13. Rabbit

    Rabbit Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,454
    Location:
    Germany
    I'm sure you'll find a period photo of folks wearing, for instance, dark loafers with cream flannels somewhere. It just isn't a very successful combination, but that probably didn't keep people from wearing them.
     
  14. Dostioffsky

    Dostioffsky One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    213
    Location:
    the Netherlands
    While I do prefer white shoes, I think darker shoes look fine too. Depends a bit on the rest of the outfit. But if it looks good, it looks good, even if it is against any 'rules' or conventions if you ask me.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Or contrasting saddle shoes:

    [​IMG]

    That said, my choice would probably be bright white canvas shoes. Something like this;

    douglas_fairbanks_1909_zpsi4ocal8o.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2015
  15. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,022
    Location:
    East Sussex, England
    white flannels, white canvas cricket boots or canvas shoes with dark socks was common in the UK:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Fastuni

    Fastuni Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,278
    Location:
    Germany
    I've got a pair of good condition cream white, cuffed German 1920's trousers that are too small for me.
    They are like something between a sturdy worsted and flanell (similar weave but without the nap).
    If you fellas are interested I will photograph it and take measure.
     
  17. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,022
    Location:
    East Sussex, England
    Fastuni, could you PM me the usual measurements please ?
     
  18. volvomeister13

    volvomeister13 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    107
    Location:
    United States
    HBK if they don't work for you I'm game.
     
  19. Fastuni

    Fastuni Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,278
    Location:
    Germany
    Here the pics - they will go to HBK. Sorry Volvo... what suit size are you? I might have something else for you (size 40).

    The only exterior spots are on and near the belt loop to the right.
    It appears to be faint coffee and not rust... it will certainly clean out nicely.

    The legs have at the bottom buttons to attach a strap in order to straighten the legs.

    The buckles have a D.R.G.M number (Deutsches Reichs-Gebrauchsmuster = German Reich utility patent, a designation used 1891-1945).

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2015
  20. simonc

    simonc Practically Family

    Messages:
    918
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    These have 10% cashmere in them, I have been testing them, 19oz lambswool, the weave is very smooth and dense, zero bobbling, indeed quiet the opposite the cloth is bedding down nicely.


    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.