Aero Stuart Brown Vintage FQHH Lining questions

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by db9v, Apr 7, 2012.

  1. db9v

    db9v New in Town

    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    california
    Hi Everyone

    This is my first post after reading through all the helpful information on this website. After hours of research on the Fedora Lounge, I decided to order the Aero Stuart after seeing another Aero Stuart on this site from augustus18. In my opinion that is the sharpest looking jacket I have seen in a long time. The trim fit with the button front was exactly what I was looking for. I just ordered one from Amanda this week and basically copied most of augustus18's specs from his jacket. Thanks Augustus for posting your jacket! I just made a couple of changes to the lining and I went with the vintage brown FQHH instead of the standard. Living in Southern California, I was looking for a lighter jacket that I could wear more often due to the mild winters we have here. I asked Amanda for their lightest FQHH which she had in the vintage brown. She also recommended cotton drill lining as the lightest lining which I went with with this order. I was hoping to get some recommendations from some of the members here about different linings. I would like to be able to wear the jacket for 3 seasons and our average temperatures are 50-70 degrees during spring, fall and winter. I do like the different plaid wool linings but I think it may be overkill for this type of weather. Any ideas? Or is cotton drill the best choice?

    Here's a link to Augustus18's jacket:

    http://www.thefedoralounge.com/show...tuart-mid-warm-mid-long&highlight=aero+stuart


    Thanks for your input

    Mike
     
  2. Peacoat

    Peacoat Bartender Staff Member Bartender

    Messages:
    4,818
    Location:
    South of Nashville
    I think for your purposes, the cotton drill lining would be the best bet. It wears like iron and will last as long as the FQHH. If you should want to wear it on a cooler than normal day, a sweater or a light vest would do the trick.
     
  3. Amanda is right. Cotton drill is the 'least' warm of any linings that Aero offers..in my Experience. I've owned two Aero jackets with that lining. A HalfBelt and Aero MC jacket. The MC jacket was sold on. Riding my motorcycle on cool damp nights made my decision. This lining seems to breathe rather than insulate any against cold. The MC jacket was too tight to layer as well.
    I think the cotton drill would be a nice lining for your temps. It is also one of Aero's most durable linings!
    HD
     
  4. Rudie

    Rudie Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,042
    Location:
    Berlin
    What about the A-2 lining? Isn't that supposed to be lighter than the cotton drill?
     
  5. Forgot about the A2 lining! Yes..it is lighter weight and thinner...but not near as durable. It will wear through...especially below the collar..very easily.
     
  6. Rudie

    Rudie Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,042
    Location:
    Berlin
    What do you mean by "very easily"?
     
  7. Well..actually what I meant was..with heavy wear the A2 lining will wear through much easier than the cotton drill. Below the collar on an A2 has always been a weak point with the thinner smooth cotton lining.
    HD
     
  8. db9v

    db9v New in Town

    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    california
    Thanks for the input Peacoat...I do want a lining that will last as long as the Leather.
     
  9. db9v

    db9v New in Town

    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    california
    Thanks HD...it sounds like cotton drill is the way to go..Thanks for the advice..I saw some pictures of your Stuart jacket also, which also had the trim fit that I liked on this style.
     
  10. Davy Crockett

    Davy Crockett A-List Customer

    Messages:
    320
    Location:
    UK
    Hi Mike,
    I have a Stockman which is lined in the lightest of the tartans (the lochcarron Reiver) this is a 10 oz fabric, the sleeves of my jacket are lined in cotton drill which to me seems even denser than the reiver tartan also there is very little difference in the thickness of the fabrics, so personally I would say if you prefer the tartan go for it!

    D
     
  11. Rudie

    Rudie Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,042
    Location:
    Berlin
    Thanks, HD. I guess the lining is still going to last for many years, isn't it?
     
  12. db9v

    db9v New in Town

    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    california
    Rudie,

    I did not know about this lining. I will ask Amanda about it, to see if it would work for what I am looking for. According to HD it might not be sturdy enough for the fqhh, but it's worth asking about. I was also considering no liner at all, but I don't think I will go that route Thanks for the info
     
  13. db9v

    db9v New in Town

    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    california
    D, good idea..I will ask Amanda about that. Line the sleeves with the cotton and the body with their thinnest wool, but do you think the wool may be too warm? It never gets colder than 50 degrees over here.
     
  14. It's according to how hard you wear it...or how often. I have several repro A2s that I wear only occassionally..and the knits and liner are practically as new. However..if an A2 is worn most every day..a few years wear can certainly take it's toll.
    HD
     
  15. Durablity isn't neccessarily all to do with thickness. It is also abrasion resistance. Aero's cotton drill seems to be pretty tough stuff compared to other linings. That's why it also makes for a good sleeve lining.
    HD
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2012
  16. Rudie

    Rudie Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,042
    Location:
    Berlin
    HD, does the cotton drill wear much warmer than the A-2 lining? If not I might reconsider and change my current order from A-2 lining to cotton drill.
     
  17. Brando11

    Brando11 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    419
    Location:
    Chicago
    Been wearing my new HB Deluxe for a week or so now. It's been in the 50s here in Chicago, but even with the Black Watch tartan wool, it's not too warm. In fact, it's incredibly comfortable.

    My only suggestion would be to have the sleeves lined in something like a satin, something that's not too "grabby" when you slide the jacket on.

    -Brando
     
  18. That's hard for me really to say Rudie.
    I was always 'chilly' in my cotton drill lined Hvy FQHH jackets...especially if it was a damp cold. That's why I only own one jacket with that lining now. With my lighter weight HH A2s...if it gets real cool..I usually put on a heavier jacket. To be sure of what liner would be good for your needs definately discuss it with Amanda she would know for sure.
    I did notice that the 'brown' cotton drill in my HB seems thinner than the black cotton drill in the Aero MC jacket that I once had. Neither was 'warm'...but I could tell a difference in thickness between the two. Perhaps Aero has a very light weight cotton drill upon request.
    HD
     
  19. oldcrow82

    oldcrow82 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    Northern California
    I wasnt that impressed with the cotton drill. I had red cotton drill in my highwayman and it wasn't warm enough for me (caveat I'm a warm blooded fellow) if it's more abrasion resistant the tartans must e weak. I put two wear holes where the leather bunched from the draw cinch at the waist.
    I am going with the heaviest of the tartans, from the strome line of 16oz. Give me a year or two and I'll let you know if its any more durable. ;)
     
  20. feltfan

    feltfan My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,174
    Location:
    Oakland, CA, USA
    Recommend that you heed the mention in other postings on this forum to have some leather or corduroy sewn
    in to the base of the back of the lining. This will prevent the cotton drill from sagging and popping out
    the back of the jacket.

    I just received my cotton drill-lined Hercules FQHH jacket this week.
    I'm already noticing that the lining is tending to sag there and maybe peek out.
    Mark at Aero USA talked me out of putting that sag protection at the back of
    my jacket and I regret it. Of course I can add it later if I need to, so it's not the
    worst mistake to make. But do consider it.
     

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