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Aero Teamster for the bike

t4halo

One of the Regulars
Messages
129
Location
Irish Hills, MI
I’m wondering what you gentleman think about using a Teamster as a motorcycle jacket. I’m 5’8 and know the Teamster runs about 28 to 30 inches in back length. I like the look but wonder if it’s a bit long? Both my Langlitz Cascade and Aero Sheene are around 26” length jackets.

Thanks, T4
 

t4halo

One of the Regulars
Messages
129
Location
Irish Hills, MI
Thanks Cornelius. The button front doenst bother me too much. I ride in a Prison Blues denim jacket during the warmer months and it doesnt blow up too awfully bad.

T4
 

AeroFan_07

I'll Lock Up
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4,580
Location
Iowa
I would persoanlly reccommed against that style of jacket for motorcycling, unless you want to do a "tweed ride" (vintage style & reproduction). There are may other much better styles that work well for that type of activitiy.
 

Marc mndt

I'll Lock Up
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4,721
I would think the button front here would present a problem for riding - that leather jacket will inflate like a balloon once you reach even moderate speed.
I don't ride so I cant tell (I don't think my Vespa counts lol) but if I remember correctly @red devil wears his buttoned Thedi on the motorcycle.
 

t4halo

One of the Regulars
Messages
129
Location
Irish Hills, MI
Red Devil, I ride a 73 Ironhead around town and a 95 Fatboy for longer trips.
D9C05B34-19A8-40F9-B376-94B9DFB5B386.jpeg
A258ED8A-D9E3-47D1-AD86-14B5C9F7BBCB.png
 

red devil

My Mail is Forwarded Here
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3,542
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London
Red Devil, I ride a 73 Ironhead around town and a 95 Fatboy for longer trips. View attachment 397677View attachment 397678

I suppose you could ride with a Teamster. because of your riding position, but you will end up sitting on the end of the coat or having it bunch up.

Also Aero are really not designed for riding, they are more useful when walking around.

If you want protection and higher end leather, you can get CXL and armour from Johnson Leathers, they make functional riding gear and they can source almost anything you wish for.
 

Carlos840

I'll Lock Up
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4,620
Location
London
Off topic: meanwhile at Eastman they're wearing halfbelts for riding.

View attachment 397822

Funny how marketing works...
I personally would never ride in that jacket, the leather is paper thin and would most likely not hold up in a crash, and the lack of windflap means you have a giant baloon back above 70km/h.
This is probably one of the least bike friendly jackets in my collection...
 

Fifty150

One Too Many
Messages
1,431
Location
The Barbary Coast
A lot of brands sell motorcycle style jackets. They look good. Very few jackets are actually built for riding a motorcycle. My own view is that the jacket should provide protection. Protection from the elements, and protection from the road. Most leather jackets will protect the rider from the wind, a little wetness from rain and fog, and whatever small pieces of garbage, pebbles, and insects which will hit the jacket at high speed. If you go down, the jacket should save your skin. You'll still get bruises, broken bones, and whatever else. But when your body is sliding on the pavement, the jacket takes the abuse and not your bare skin. I'm not so concerned about the jacket holding up and staying together. If the jacket rips up, it's better than my skin shredding. Thicker, heavier hide is better for that. Steer and buffalo are probably best. Suede and soft, supple lambskin may be the least protective. I'm not expert. I've never seen any scientific studies done on which leather hide is the toughest for falling off a motorcycle. For my own use, I want the jacket to fit for riding. My arms have to be able to reach up and out for the handlebars. I don't want wind blowing up the back. I think that those half belts on the front with the buckle are only decorative, and that the buckle will scratch the gas tank. The sleeve needs a cuff which can open, and close to fit the wrist. Wind flap on the outside, with snaps to hold it down over the zipper, so that the zipper won't scratch the gas tank is also nice. A luxury touch would be a removable liner so that you can wear the jacket on hot days without the insulation.

As a teenager, I rode motorcycles with an A-2 style flight jacket. It did the job. I didn't have a cross zip style, double breasted, "motorcycle style", jacket until later on in life. I learned a few things from that jacket, as it wasn't the best. 1, was that a "lesser quality" jacket, for a cheap price, could be made with a heavy hide, and it protects just as well as an expensive jacket. 2, if that moto style has some kind of belt, it's better to have belt loops and a full belt, than the sewn on half belt. The full belt, if it's cheap and decorative, can be removed. I can use a good, sturdy belt, or no belt at all. Those decorative half belts in the front don't really do a good job of tightening the waist to keep wind out. Cutting off those decorative half belts just makes the jacket look like trash. 3, cheap jackets just are not warm, and if I get one, make sure that I have enough size to layer under it. And as in other cases, expensive jackets aren't warm either, since a lot of them do not have insulated linings. So whether I'm buying a cheap jacket, or an expensive jacket; tight, fitted jackets do not allow me to layer for warmth. 4, as I've had a few decades to think about it; I don't care if the cheap jacket gets beer spilled on it, leather dye discolors from UV rays in the sun, or damage from sand and salt air from the ocean. I will not cry if someone in a bar tries to stab the jacket with a broken bottle. If I actually fall, and the leather gets ripped, torn, scuffed; it doesn't matter as long as my skin is intact.
 
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