Any straw Akubra experience ?

Discussion in 'Hats' started by Achille, May 24, 2007.

  1. Achille

    Achille Familiar Face

    Messages:
    66
    Location:
    Paris
    Hello,
    I have recently bought an Akubra country club.
    The straw (synthetic?)is realy reay thick and even the size is goog the shape is not the one of my head. It compressed my front and is relativly large on the sides.
    Does somebody know a way to adapte the shape to my head ?


    Thanks
    J.M.
     
  2. MattJH

    MattJH One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,388
    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    There's a bit of information in this thread. They're made of polypropylene, which is essentially a versatile plastic and, from what I hear, not so great at breathing in the hot air. You should post your experiences with yours after wearing it in the heat and humidity.
     
  3. Undertow

    Undertow My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,127
    Location:
    Des Moines, IA, US
    Yes, please post your experience! And some pictures if you can!
     
  4. Not-Bogart13

    Not-Bogart13 Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,502
    Location:
    NE Pennsylvania
    I've never owned a straw Akubra, but I noticed their felt hats have the same overly-round shape that you describe. Mine gradually conformed to the shape of my head. However, if the hat is very stiff or the front is painfully tight, you might need the next size up.
     
  5. cookie

    cookie I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,913
    Location:
    Sydney Australia
    Akubra "Straws" aka PolyProp

    I warned all youse guys that they were plastic when Mojave Jack was thinking of purchasing one. I'm on the ground down here!
     
  6. Achille

    Achille Familiar Face

    Messages:
    66
    Location:
    Paris
    Sorry cookie I had not read your post [huh] .

    About my experience :
    [​IMG]
    When I read that the material is synthetic I have tried to compress the sides of the hat to make the shape more oval (!!!!a LIGHT pressure). As it is not natural straw .....
    It has worked and the shape in now ok.

    The fake weaving is nice because the wind comes easily in the hat. Its necessary because apparently the material absorbs more the heat that the straw.

    Compared to a natural straw hat it's really heavier (too) it's useful for wind weather but not as confortable as a real straw hat.
    [​IMG]
    Conclusion :
    The shape of the hat is really great and it's not a bad product but can't be compared with a natural straw hat.

    Best all
    J.M.;)
     
  7. Dave McCone

    Dave McCone New in Town

    Messages:
    41
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    I would caution folks against a poly hat. Here, for your amusement, is my story:

    About four years ago, my daughter was invited to a children's dance festival in Brazil. As part of that trip, we decided to stay a few days longer in Brazil, and go up the Amazon, to Manaus for general sightseeing. In doing some research beforehand, it looked as iif one of the Riverz polypro hats would be just the ticket - packs well, and would likely be pretty impervious to anything the Amazon could dish out.

    I have to add at this point that I live in Seattle; this is not an area known for hot weather. If anything, folks get quite excited if the sun is shining and the temperature is over 65 degrees. In short, the hat did just fine in the cool maritime climate of Seattle.

    Fast forward a few weeks to our Brazil trip. We step off of the plane in Manaus, and the heat and humidty hit us like a freight train - temperatures in the high ninties, and humidity hovering just less than 100%.

    The Riverz hat didn't breathe at all - if anything, it seemed to keep heat in. The overall effect was about as comfortable as wrapping your head in several plastic garbage bags on a hot day.

    To Riverz credit, the hat is very well made, and pretty much indestructible [and after enduring the hat for a few hours in the heat, destruction was definitely under serious consideration]. The hat also floats, so sending it to a watery grave in the murky waters of the Rio Negro wasn't successful either.

    The hat came home with me; it's sat in a box ever since then. Definitely a not-so-fond memory of our Amazon trip.

    So - as far as polypro hats are concerned, I would advise caution
     
  8. Achille

    Achille Familiar Face

    Messages:
    66
    Location:
    Paris

    Hahahaha :D
    Excellent Dave !!!!
    I think that if I would have been in your situation I would have thrown mine away.
    But I have it and before to buy a panama to Bob (as soon as possible) I will keep it. But I can understand perfectly you point of view.

    Greetings:
     
  9. johnnycanuck

    johnnycanuck Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,088
    Location:
    Alberta
    Interesting information. So how does the Akubra straw/polypropylene hats stand up against their felts in the hot weather (better/worse)? Has anyone asked if it actually blocks out the UV rays?
    Johnny
     
  10. Achille

    Achille Familiar Face

    Messages:
    66
    Location:
    Paris
    Hello johnnycanuck,
    The felt Akubras are a little bit hotter than the poly' ones, but mainly because of the holes in the fake weaving. The poly ones are heavyer and not really pleasant to wear.

    I've won on ebay an Akubra Snowy river (without lining). I will give it to a hatter to reduce the brim. I hope that it will be ok for the summer.

    Thanks

    J.M
     
  11. Fletch

    Fletch I'll Lock Up

    :eek:fftopic: I just got a cheapie (not a 'koober) woven "straw" hat that says it's 87% PAPER, 13% POLYESTER. It's thick and bendy and shapable and looks like it''ll be cool in the heat.

    Anybody ever have a hat made out of mostly PAPER?!??!
    < / :eek:fftopic: >
     
  12. Rick Blaine

    Rick Blaine My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,950
    Location:
    Hillbilly Heaven
    From :
    Types of straw
    Shantung – Sometimes referred to as Shantung Panama. (Note: There is no such thing as Shantung Panama.) In actuality, Shantung is a man-made high performance paper yarn. The Japanese people named this high performance paper "Washi," which literally means "Japanese Paper." Originally three plants were used in making washi in Japan. The three plants are Kozo, Mitsumata, and Gampi. Because of quantity, availability, and tensile strength, washi is now mainly made from the Manila Hemp Plant. (Musa Textilis, Abaca) Its most amazing characteristic is that it can absorb thirty percent moisture without having the feeling of wetness. It has high tear strength and is considered to be the strongest of all natural fibers. It is great for making hats. Shantung is light weight, durable, and beautiful. It is very similar, by looks, to genuine Panama Hats.

    Bangora – Bangora straw is sometimes referred to as Bandera straw and Bangkok weave. Bangora straw hat bodies are actually made out of paper of a lower grade "Washi," usually made in China. Most of the times, the Bangora hat bodies are unglazed and tend to be less durable. (Note: many times, hat companies will simply call these Chinese paper hat bodies, Shantung because they are similar to the Japanese paper hat bodies.) Bangora hats are unique because they are one of very few woven hats to be woven with a machine. This is why all Bangora hats have a perpendicular weave pattern.
     

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