Want to buy or sell something? Check the classifieds

AbbaDatDeHat

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,058
I've had some bad results, too, and have stopped using Lexol on my sweats.
Hello Sir: i certainly do not disagree with your post. I recall your posts on that subject when i was researching and took heed. Ken’s pic before and after are the first i have seen of catastrophic disintegration! Think i have been lucky but i try NOT to use it on sweats i consider very fragile and friable. I’ve had the greatest result, it seems, on older high quality bands that don’t seem to have a “finish” on them such as Dobbs Rainbow etc. Maybe worn off?? Idk my 2cents. Thanks. Be well. Bowen
 

AbbaDatDeHat

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,058
The problem lies in people thinking that treating an already dried out sweat will revive it

It won’t
Hello Sir: another issue i found while researching leather revival and restorations by professionals was the distinction between revival and restoration. I recall two seperate camps. The first professional museum leather preservationalists where the item was displayed, NOT used and the other professional restoration folk who wore the items (coats etc). Wish i could recall the particulars but your point rings true. One however i recall seemed much more hat friendly. Interesting topic to research especially if one wears vintage leather jackets. Be well. Bowen
 

FedoraFan112390

Practically Family
Messages
645
Location
Brooklyn, NY
The first two pictures look like cotton safari hats. Like the kind Tilley makes.
this https://www.tilley.com/ca_en/t3-cotton-duck-hat.html
or this https://www.tilley.com/ca_en/ltm3-airflo-hat.html for the green under brim.
Just add your own hat band.
Now the third picture is interesting. it almost looks like a straw open road hat with a wide cattleman's crease.
back in the 70's they used to add fabric under the brims of straw hats for added sun protection and reduced glare. closest I can find is this https://www.sunbody.com/index.cfm/product/589_1/open-road.cfm
Do you know what it was made form? Straw? Felt? cotton?
Hope that helps some.

I can't remember exactly (these pictures are from 20+ years ago) but I will say I doubt it was straw because the first two pictures (in the car) were taken in December 1995, and he wore this particular hat at times during the winter around that time. Probably felt or cotton. Do you have any idea about the band though?
 

johnnycanuck

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,959
Location
Alberta
Back in the 90’s you could get cotton bucket hats like that with enough crown you can shape them into a little bit of a style. The bands were usually tropical pattern fabric folded over a few times like a pug band. A friend had one back in high school he shaped like a fedora.
Hope that helps some. No idea who would make anything like this anymore. Same idea as those corduroy cowboy hats that had back in the 80’s. In fact it could be an open road version of those corduroy cowboy hats.
Hope this helps.
Johnny
 

Nolucker

New in Town
Messages
20
Question about Western or "cowboy" style hats. Why are they made so stiff, as opposed to many fedoras I have handled? If this was previously discussed, I apologize.
 

Ken David

One of the Regulars
Messages
274
Location
North Carolina
Once a sweat has reached a certain stage of deterioration, which it appears yours has, Abba, nothing is going to revive it. It is more than likely that it was not the Lexol, but the act of applying it, that destroyed whatever was left of its structural integrity.
I just purchased this hat and only wore it 2 times. The sweat was apparently in good shape (supple with some minor cracking), I should of left it alone I guess, I thought the Lexol would preserve the sweat (lightly applied with a cotton fiber rag). My bad, hat is un-wearable now.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

jlee562

I'll Lock Up
Messages
4,920
Location
San Francisco, CA
Question about Western or "cowboy" style hats. Why are they made so stiff, as opposed to many fedoras I have handled? If this was previously discussed, I apologize.

I'd be interested in learning how and why this happened actually. My suspicion is that felt stiffener increased as felt quality decreased.

But if you look at John Wayne's hat in The Searchers, you've got the brim flapping around in the wind. And sure that's a movie hat that's been beat up a bit, but there's no way it started out as stiff as any modern hat.
 
Messages
12,384
Location
Albany Oregon
Once a sweat has reached a certain stage of deterioration, which it appears yours has, Abba, nothing is going to revive it. It is more than likely that it was not the Lexol, but the act of applying it, that destroyed whatever was left of its structural integrity.
+1 Good theory here. Restoration specialists of antique auto leather use a clean/restore system. I surfed into an interesting product and tutorial for a company called Chamerlain's Leather Milk. More study of their website is in process. Looks promising.
 
Messages
12,384
Location
Albany Oregon
I just purchased this hat and only wore it 2 times. The sweat was apparently in good shape (supple with some minor cracking), I should of left it alone I guess, I thought the Lexol would preserve the sweat (lightly applied with a cotton fiber rag). My bad, hat is un-wearable now.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
:( sorry about this bad experience. A new sweat and a spiff up from a Hatter is like a spa treatment for a hat. I have a few that I just had to say goodbye to the old sweat (I keep them in an archival box) and live with a non-original modern version. My hatter, NW Hats, will then form the hat to my custom hat form, making them fit like a brand new bespoke hat.
 
Messages
11,562
Location
Southern California
I can't remember exactly (these pictures are from 20+ years ago) but I will say I doubt it was straw because the first two pictures (in the car) were taken in December 1995, and he wore this particular hat at times during the winter around that time. Probably felt or cotton. Do you have any idea about the band though?
Try a Google search for "pleated hat bands". It's highly unlikely you'll be able to find the exact pattern, but you might find one that's close enough to give you the "familiar" feeling of your Dad's hat.
 
Messages
10,779
Location
Alabama
Have been using lexol in all my hats for over 5 years,no problems.But if the sweat is trashed already it won't help.

I used Lexol for a number of years on all sorts of leather w/o a problem. Bick is easier for me to come by now, so that's what I use. I've also bought vintage lids that upon arrival, the sweat looked good, even felt soft and supple then, after a treatment, they began to disintegrate. I think the same thing would have occurred after wearing the hat a bit w/o treatment.

I think one of the problems is we have no idea what sort of conditions some of these old hats have been stored in. Probably many w/o being in the light or fresh air for years.
 
Last edited:

Forum statistics

Threads
102,927
Messages
2,921,441
Members
49,848
Latest member
Komander
Top