Best Golden Era fedoras in a post-'50s movie?

Discussion in 'Hats' started by Marc Chevalier, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. A very specific question for Fedora Loungers: in your opinion, which single movie made after 1960 features the most authentic-looking 'Golden Era' fedoras (and/or homburgs, caps, etc.)?


    For me, Richard Gere's late '20s and early '30s fedoras in THE COTTON CLUB (1984) are as authentic as Hollywood gets:


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    Nicolas Cage's isn't bad, either:

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    Last edited: Aug 4, 2011
  2. Great hats and overcoats. Wonder who did the hats for that one?
     

  3. In a 1984 interview with GQ magazine, the head costumer mentioned that most of the men's costumes --even for the lead actors-- were vintage 1920s-'30s pieces. I believe she meant the fedoras, too.
     
  4. Wow, I'd love to have access to those!
     
  5. Alex

    Alex Practically Family

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    Can't get any more authentic than.. well authentic haha.
     
  6. Except that sometimes Hollywood uses, say, authentic vintage 1950s fedoras in films that take place in, say, the late 1920s. (I believe that Clint Eastwood's big-budget CHANGELING did this, with mediocre results.)
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2011
  7. HatsEnough

    HatsEnough Banned

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    Boardwalk Empire had all the wrong hats, too.
     
  8. RBH

    RBH Bartender

    I thought the hat Bruce Willis wore in Last Man Standing was good.

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  9. Alex

    Alex Practically Family

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    Location:
    Iowa, US
    Tucker, starring Jeff Bridges, has great hats.
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    Also Public Enemies is up there.
     
  10. SgtRick

    SgtRick One of the Regulars

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    "O' Brother Where Art Thou?" had a hat on every head it seems. Lots of variety as well.
     
  11. T Rick

    T Rick Practically Family

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    No idea how accurate they were, but I seem to recall some cool hats in Last Man Standing.
     
  12. ryanc

    ryanc Familiar Face

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    actually my client actually knows one of the clothiers for boardwalk cast. and most of the hats is spot on even the one jimmy starts wearing later in the season. just like they have said in interviews the did massive research on making sure, suit cut to patter to material and especially colors and all the wardrobe match the popularity of people in the year 1920 and not 1919 or 1921 because it actually varies alot in a year. now no doubt there new reproduction fedoras and homburgs but never the less its color choices and dimensions
     
  13. redhawks2

    redhawks2 One of the Regulars

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    I just watched "Last Man Standing" the other night and was very taken by Willis' hat. It looks very period to me with the narrower brim and high crown. I'm thinking I may want to get a hat made like that.
     

  14. Redhawks2, you can see that exact hat (the one which Willis wore in the movie) on display at a store in Burbank called "It's A Wrap". It's in a lucite box frame on the righthand wall. Not for sale, alas.

    Here are directions to the store: http://www.itsawraphollywood.com/burbank.htm
     
  15. zetwal

    zetwal I'll Lock Up

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    Location:
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    Does Chinatown (1974) make your (fashion) cut?
     

  16. For the most part, it does. Jack Nicholson's hats in particular were great-looking, IMO. (I'm looking at some Google Images of the Nicholson hats. Come to think of it, they seem much more 1950s than '30s. Oops...)
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2011

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