Caps and gowns and flip flops

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by dhermann1, May 26, 2009.

  1. Paisley

    Paisley I'll Lock Up

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    If the 70s revival is finally over and the 80s revival is next, the issue of flip-flops and hoochie-mama clothes for girls might become passe. I remember looking at the school dress code during the 80s--no halter tops, no bare midriffs, etc.--and wondering, "Who wears this stuff?"
     
  2. Phil

    Phil A-List Customer

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    I do somewhat miss uniforms. But that's really only good through grade school and maybe high school.

    As Marc was saying, it does eliminate the whole label comeptition. But this is provided that there is ONE store/brand that sells the clothes and the school allows. However, when I used to go to Catholic school, Pre-school through fifth grade boys were expected to wear the prescribed navy blue pants and light blue knit polo.
    However, once in sixth grade through graduation, boys were expected to wear a light blue button down dress shirt, navy dress slacks, and black dress shoes. These didn't have a set brand. So, once again, although you all look the same, there's still the competition of the kid with a Nautica shirt and the kid with the Gucci shirt. I know it sounds pointless, but when that 7-3 lockdown in a single building happens, it's a seemingly big deal.

    So, there's my two cents.
     
  3. True. In Chile (and other countries), the school uniforms are made by a handful of uniform manufacturers. The items are sold in department stores and in specialized uniform shops. There isn't much difference in quality among the labels: they tend to be durable, easy-care clothes.


    .
     
  4. Geesie

    Geesie Practically Family

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    Oh, the 80s leggings are here.
     
  5. Phil

    Phil A-List Customer

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    If you love Chile so much why don't you marry it?
    :p
     
  6. Mid-fogey

    Mid-fogey Practically Family

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    Many of...

    ...these kids have been raised without ever having to dress up, sit at table for a meal, use manners, learn any social grace, etc. It isn't their fault. It's the way they were raised.

    As I noted in another thread, I saw a man in church with a white t-shirt, cargo shorts and flip flops. He'd have to be naked to be more casual. There are people there I've never seen, summer or winter, in any other shoes except sandals. It be the norm.

    I have noticed an interesting note of guilt in many of the very casual dressers. It's as if they feel that somehow they shouldn't be doing it. Even the aggressively casual, who wear their slackitude like a holy crown, feel the need to make excuses for themselves.
     
  7. Or have a baby with it? lol


    Actually, we're planning on moving back there in 2012.

    .
     
  8. Mid-fogey

    Mid-fogey Practically Family

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    It's a hit...

    ...you sunk his battship. With a flip flop.
     
  9. Brad Bowers

    Brad Bowers I'll Lock Up

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    I'm just hoping '80s hair comes back. I'm so tired of seeing straight, flat hair.lol

    Brad
     
  10. Miss_Bella_Hell

    Miss_Bella_Hell My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    First, it does NOT eliminate label snobbery. Have you never seen a uniformed 12 year old girl with Prada Sport shoes on? I have. Her friends had designer shoes on too. I imagine the punk rockers wear Docs with their uniforms.

    Further, I dress well, and I did not learn it from my mom. She learned it from me. :p
     
  11. Viola

    Viola Call Me a Cab

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    My parents wore jeans to their graduation, I think. Or something about my granddad told my mom she was grounded if she didn't and then she changed right after the aisle walkage.

    It was the '70s.

    I don't think this is new.
     
  12. GeniusInTheLamp

    GeniusInTheLamp One of the Regulars

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    When I graduated from high school (1983), the stoners were the only ones who wore jeans and sneakers under their gowns. Everyone else - jocks, preppies, band geeks - dressed appropriately.

    You're not alone, Brad. And I'd like to see hair colors other than platinum blonde and jet black.
     
  13. Viola

    Viola Call Me a Cab

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    How is it more economical? My parents didn't buy me new button down shirts or pants/skirts or dress shoes every year.

    Who cares about what-to-wear-everyday hassle? I don't get that. Either you enjoy the picking out an outfit, or you throw your chosen neutral pants at whatever shirt's clean, right?

    It doesn't eliminate competition among any uniform-clad girls I've ever known. It just becomes what hair things, what jewelry, what phone, what shoes you have. I guess it might stymie boys though, I don't know. But I suspect not, I've known a lot of boy shoe-snobs under the age of 17, and many jewelry guys as well.

    You may have neatly, there. Though I imagine the range of wrinkles and general rumplement, as well as intentional rule-skirting, varies a lot by kid and age. Japanese kids manage to do astonishing things with hairspray because of this.
     
  14. Paisley

    Paisley I'll Lock Up

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    Uniforms don't eliminate cattiness, either. When my mom was in high school in the 40s, the girls had to wear a blue or black skirt and white cotton blouse. One day, my mom wore a rayon blouse, under a sweater, because it was the only clean one she had. Another girl tattled on her.:rolleyes:
     
  15. Foofoogal

    Foofoogal Banned

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    I guess it depends on the school. My daughters school actually brought the items to the school for the parents to buy. A few other additions were allowed but strictly.
    It was very strict. No lace on socks and no kidding she was called on for a mock turtleneck shirt.
    After enduring previous years of countless changes to style of clothing it was a dream for me as a mother. The uniforms didn't even wrinkle.
    The school was geared towards college preparatory and learning to stay on task and such has served her very well. It was worth every dime and at the time hard for us financially but God always provided the funds.

    BTW:Marc makes Chili sound inviting IMHO. To be proud of ones homeland and lifestyle is to be admired.
     
  16. Lady Day

    Lady Day I'll Lock Up Bartender

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    As far as the graduation thing, I get a feeling from a lot of younger grads that there is an association of dressing up with being 'conservative'. [huh]

    Dressing up in circumstances such as a graduation, often means the look above comfort. That is something a lot of kids dont equate. The dressed up look to them is fading into the background, and why do that 'AND be uncomfortable when I can just wear jeans and Keds? No one is going to see my shirt anyway.'

    Not dressing up is still rebellious, even thought everyone does it. And being comfortable, or rather placing no effort in the situation trumps everything.

    I actually think Home Economics needs to come back to teach some of this stuff. So even if you dont want to practice it, you at least know where it stems from.

    LD
     
  17. JennyLou

    JennyLou Practically Family

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    Yes, I wished more schools had Home Economic programs. I would have majored in Home Ec in college if it wasn't such a dying field. I was fortunate to go to a high school with a Home Economics department but they did not teach about how to dress up for certain occasions or why we should.
     
  18. LaMedicine

    LaMedicine One Too Many

    And how much the school allows. What probably appears in foreign media is usually actually the extreme, or close to it, locally, in any country, I would say, and so it is here in Japan. While I know there are a wide variety of makeup and hair style maybe just because the majority of secondary schools here have uniforms, many schools also have rules as to what is allowed other than the clothes--no make up in most cases, which some girls try to get round with lip gloss but anyhow--hair style also, so if one attends a relatively prestigious private school (which many willingly do, due to their academic prowress) the rules are relatively strict, and they are enforced, or rather, in most cases, the students are clever enough to stay in line whenever/wherever the rules apply. That doesn't mean they don't get inventive and imaginative in their private time, though lol lol lol
    Graduation here is still a very much dressing up occasion on all level sat any educational institution. If there's a uniform, a uniform it is. If there's no uniform, then, especially with colleges and universities (we don't have caps and gowns here) the majority of girls wear kimonos in the style that was popular in the Meiji-Taisho era (1868-1925) and change into more formal kimono for the party afterwards, and the boys in suits and tie, some in formal style kimonos as well. :)
    Oh, P.S. Please excuse the flip-flops of the girls lol lol lol
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  19. LordBest

    LordBest Practically Family

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    There are actually firm benefits to a school introducing compulsory school uniforms, there have been numerous studies on the subject both in Australia and the US and no doubt other countries also. My mother is a school psychologist and she has seen firsthand the reduction in bullying in schools which have re-introduced school uniforms.
    I reject utterly the idea some express that it infringed upon childrends ability to express themselves, in my view it enhances it. When all the children are dressed the same they have to express themselves throuh academic achievement, rather than dressing outlandishly.
    When I was at high school everything you wore had to be acceptable to the school dress code, right down to shoes (no designer shoe competitions) and no designer accessories were allowed either.
    The uniform items themselves were not brilliant quality but decent enough, and the price was quite reasonable, less than any 'cool' clothing. There were no 'official' outfitters for the school any many chain stores carriy school items so prices tend to be depressed somewhat.
    Now at the time I absolutely hated it, but after I left high school I really began to appreciate it.
     
  20. Spitfire

    Spitfire I'll Lock Up

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    [​IMG]

    Even in Cuba schooluniforms are a hit!
    And - as you can see - the kids don't mind.
     

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