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Cleaning satin lining

Bogie1943

Practically Family
Messages
672
Location
Proctorville, Ohio
Hi ya fellas, I recently picked up a couple more vintage hats (Pics coming soon). I have cleaned hat liners before but these new lids got me thinking. I bet that a few of you have some different methodes than me on cleaning these essential hat accessories. I have a good strong feeling Matt Deckard will have a few.:cool2:
 

Matt Deckard

Man of Action
Messages
10,037
Location
A devout capitalist in Los Angeles CA.
Problem is most of my vintage hats were dead stock when I recieved them and had little to no lining problems.

If you have taken the liner out, I suggest water.

MK's wife had a stain stick device that worked great on taking grease out of a tie and that might work as well on a liner that has the Brylcream smell and look.

hand cleaning with water and then letting it dry in the open air is all I can suggest unless you live by Optimo.
 

Pilgrim

One Too Many
Messages
1,718
Location
Fort Collins, CO
I have an old Stetson (Ebay what-the-heck acquisition) that I'm getting ready to dunk in naptha for a cleaning. The liner is badly yellowed, soiled and pretty nasty, and although I'm probably going to have to discard it, I'd like to at least make a try at cleaning it. It's nice to keep originals if I can.

Any advice on how to clean a liner? I can dunk it in the naptha, I can wash it with Woolite, or...............?
 

Magus

Practically Family
Messages
655
Location
Southern California
However its made you can hand wash it with woolite.

Using naphtha, if it dosn't have the plastic disk in the top the liner shouldn't be harmed. Later today I am running a test with the plastic disk linner to see what happens to it...so I couldn't say for sure if the naphtha will harm it....yet.

M
 

Magus

Practically Family
Messages
655
Location
Southern California
Small update

I set a liner to soak tonight and will check it tomarrow. Look for a post with pics of the results sometime tomarrow afternoon.

M
 

J.B.

Practically Family
Messages
677
Location
Hollywood
Magus said:
I set a liner to soak tonight and will check it tomarrow. Look for a post with pics of the results sometime tomarrow afternoon.

M

Thanks and Good Luck, Magus! :cool:
 

Pilgrim

One Too Many
Messages
1,718
Location
Fort Collins, CO
WOW! Seeing the follow-up from Magus, I know the answer. I'm really surprised and impressed to see how well that liner cleaned up. I gotta dunk that hat this weekend.
 

deadpickle

New in Town
Messages
6
Location
Lincoln, NE
Dont ask me how but, I got chocolate on my satin liner the other night. There are just a few spots and they seem very light but I'm not sure how to clean them. Any ideas?
 

deadpickle

New in Town
Messages
6
Location
Lincoln, NE
I was at friends wedding. Lets just say that it involves chocolate mints and martini's. You can fill the rest in :D
So any ideas on cleaning the satin liner?
 

tonyb

I'll Lock Up
Messages
9,659
Location
My mother's basement
It probably goes without saying, but just in case ...

Remove the liner before trying any of the above suggestions. The liners in most vintage lids are tack-stitched in. Most modern ones (with the exception of customs) are glued in.

Some of the liner's body is likely to be lost in the wash. So without something to restore its stiffness, it'll droop. And it'll almost surely be wrinkled. So an iron, and perhaps starch, would be in order. This seemingly simple step requires a bit more care than a person might think. You wouldn't be the first to scorch or melt that liner material.
 

tonyb

I'll Lock Up
Messages
9,659
Location
My mother's basement
It all kinda depends on what sort of liner it is, gtdean. You know, what fabric it's made of and whether the maker's logo and whatnot is printed or embroidered. It's unlikely that naphtha would do it any harm (I've never known it to, but ...). Should you remove it (is it stitched into the crown?) and try a water solution, go the safest route first, which I suppose would be soaking it in a bowl (or sink, or ...) filled with cold water and a mild cleaning agent. Don't wring, don't rub.

I fear that a washing machine would leave you with a few shreds of what had been your hat's liner. Old liners may be kinda delicate because, well, they're old. And new ones may be kinda delicate because so many of them are just plain cheap.
 
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