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Counting Your Change...

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,286
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
Last night's takings at work included a real rarity -- a Series 1957 one-dollar Silver Certificate. Silver certs, which obligated the U. S. Government to "pay to the bearer on demand one dollar in silver" were the only type of one dollar bill in circulation prior to 1963, but had largely vanished from circulation by the end of the sixties. This is the first one I've seen turn up in a very, very long time -- likely somebody robbed it out of grandma's cookie jar.
 
Messages
10,858
Location
Germany
Last night's takings at work included a real rarity -- a Series 1957 one-dollar Silver Certificate. Silver certs, which obligated the U. S. Government to "pay to the bearer on demand one dollar in silver" were the only type of one dollar bill in circulation prior to 1963, but had largely vanished from circulation by the end of the sixties. This is the first one I've seen turn up in a very, very long time -- likely somebody robbed it out of grandma's cookie jar.

That's interesting! Now, I have to read about. :)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,286
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
Just intercepted the shiniest, nicest 1943 steel penny I've ever seen in circulation, which somebody passed off as a dime at the concession stand. I used to get these in change every now and then, but they were always dirty, corroded, or rusty. This one looks like it just came out of a fresh roll, which it most likely did. It certainly hasn't been circulating for seventy-three years.
 

Stanley Doble

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,808
Location
Cobourg
Last night's takings at work included a real rarity -- a Series 1957 one-dollar Silver Certificate. Silver certs, which obligated the U. S. Government to "pay to the bearer on demand one dollar in silver" were the only type of one dollar bill in circulation prior to 1963, but had largely vanished from circulation by the end of the sixties. This is the first one I've seen turn up in a very, very long time -- likely somebody robbed it out of grandma's cookie jar.
Unless they changed the law that silver certificate entitles you to $1 worth of silver at the official price of $1.29 an ounce, less than 1/10 what it sells for today. But I have a feeling they have changed the law since the sixties.
 
Messages
15,928
Location
New York City
Just intercepted the shiniest, nicest 1943 steel penny I've ever seen in circulation, which somebody passed off as a dime at the concession stand. I used to get these in change every now and then, but they were always dirty, corroded, or rusty. This one looks like it just came out of a fresh roll, which it most likely did. It certainly hasn't been circulating for seventy-three years.

If not too much of a hassle, would you mind positing a picture as it would be cool to see it?
 

VintageEveryday

A-List Customer
Messages
383
Location
Woodside, NY
I got ambitious today and took a very large can of loose change to the CoinStar machine at the local supermarket. What's entertaining about these machines is that they spit out anything that's at all out of the ordinary, and you can find some pretty unusual old, worn, or foreign coins in the reject chute. After all was said and done today, I had left over --

One Mexican 5-centavos piece

One 1966 British shilling

One 1943 steel cent

One dateless Buffalo nickel

One MBTA subway token

Two silver Roosevelt dimes, one 1948 and one 1961.

And about three dollars' worth of Canadian coins, which regularly pass here at face value.

The real surprises here were the Mexican coin -- I've never seen one turn up this far from Mexico -- and the shilling, which I guess someone must've found in the bottom of a drawer or something and passed off as a Canadian quarter. I've found a lot of Carribean coins in change, and even a French coin once, but these were both first-time finds.

What's the oddest thing you've ever found in *your* change?

I found a coin from Barbados once in an NYC metro card machine. And the odest coin I've ever seen in circulation was a grungy 1883 Liberty "no cents" nickel. She found it on the street by her usual diner a few years ago.
 
Messages
13,235
Location
Orange County, CA
2016 30th Anniversary Proof American Eagle
Recent coin show find. Instead of the normal reeded edge this year's has a smooth edge and "30th Anniversary" engraved on it.

DSCF0312_zps4d5yghk4.jpg
 

tonyb

I'll Lock Up
Messages
9,966
Location
My mother's basement
Last night's takings at work included a real rarity -- a Series 1957 one-dollar Silver Certificate. Silver certs, which obligated the U. S. Government to "pay to the bearer on demand one dollar in silver" were the only type of one dollar bill in circulation prior to 1963, but had largely vanished from circulation by the end of the sixties. This is the first one I've seen turn up in a very, very long time -- likely somebody robbed it out of grandma's cookie jar.

I happen to have a Series 1957 B Silver Certificate myself. And a pair of Series 1934 C 20-buck Federal Reserve Notes.

These bills all came my way in "regular" transactions in relatively recent years, an indication that they were likely put back into circulation through nefarious and/or desperate actions. Paper money just doesn't last THAT long.
 

F. J.

One of the Regulars
Messages
221
Location
The Magnolia State
Last night's takings at work included a real rarity -- a Series 1957 one-dollar Silver Certificate. Silver certs, which obligated the U. S. Government to "pay to the bearer on demand one dollar in silver" were the only type of one dollar bill in circulation prior to 1963, but had largely vanished from circulation by the end of the sixties. This is the first one I've seen turn up in a very, very long time -- likely somebody robbed it out of grandma's cookie jar.

A coworker had gotten a silver certificate and gave it to me to-day, knowing I like old stuff. Series 1935E. I suspect a similar origin.

Unless they changed the law that silver certificate entitles you to $1 worth of silver at the official price of $1.29 an ounce, less than 1/10 what it sells for today. But I have a feeling they have changed the law since the sixties.

Nope; they changed it in the sixties. Silver certificates haven’t been redeemable for silver since mid-1968. You can still spend ’em, though (but I’m not sure why you would).
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,286
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
It was more a tactile thing -- they actually felt unpleasantly greasy, like a dirty dish that had been left in the sink too long. I think it's because they have manganese in them as part of the alloy.

I have a similar problem with the corrosion that develops on modern pennies if you look at them sideways -- I just don't like to handle them.

On the other hand, I used to like to get nickels that had been circulated to the point of being worn slick. I still have a "V" nickel like this -- it's so worn it looks like a slug, and the feeling of handling it is pleasantly smooth.
 

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