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DEATHS ; Notable Passings; The Thread to Pay Last Respects

My Scooter

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Kirstie Alley, star of the sitcoms Cheers, Veronica’s Closet and Kirstie, has died after a battle with cancer at age 71 RIP
 

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Germany
R.I.P., Grandaunt Christa.
Strongest, toughest imaginable Grandaunt. Born 1932, no dementia, no malice, dignified life until the end! Never lived in the past.
Lucky people, experiencing this fine evening of life. Her both Granchilds had the best imaginable Grandma. And she was part of my childhood in the 90s, too.

As you may remember, my Pa (reached 84) had similar luck and even died at home. My Grandma died sudden at surgery in early 2020, age 84, so she had a similar dignified evening of life, no dementia, too.
 

Edward

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Let's not forget that before Cheers Kirstie Alley was the first (and best) Mr. Saavik!

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My understanding was that at one point during development they were thinking of the film as a springboard to launch a new cast of younger characters who would go on to form the core of a new Trek TV show. Of course, that changed along the way, Kirk's son dies, and instead, several years later, we got The Next Generation.
 

Doctor Strange

I'll Lock Up
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Actually, Edward, they were actively developing a new TV series earlier, in 76/77. When Star Wars (not yet called "Episode IV") exploded on the scene and changed the movie industry, Parmount quickly rejiggered the in-preproduction series into Star Trek: The Motion Picture. (And there are still traces: for example, the new Vulcan science officer who was supposed to replace Spock in the series dies in the transporter accident early in the film.) When TMP was successful enough to spawn the film series, the TV idea was forgotten for a while.

The Next Generation was actually Gene Roddenberry's revenge after having been kicked upstairs to executive producer of the films... where he was no longer their guiding force, Harve Bennett and Nick Meyer were. Roddenberry wanted a Trek series that reflected the future the way HE envisioned it, though some of his main principles (like "no arguments between our lead characters, they are more evolved humans") had to fall by the wayside as he became ill and his control waned.

Eventually, Deep Space Nine was conceived by his successors as the anti-Roddenberry Trek, with a bunch of characters who aren't Starfleet's best and brightest, aren't on an exploration vessel, constantly disagree with one another, are enmeshed in a messy political struggle, display shades-of-gray morality, etc.
 

St.Ignatz

Call Me a Cab
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Charlie Gracie. Rockabilly giant of the early 50's to the present. Praised and feted by english rockers. Actually expected to be paid for his work so was pushed aside by record companies. He would play anywhere and for anyone. He played once at an annual dinner of 'The Lower Merion Society for the Detection and Prosecution of Horse Thieves and the Recovery of Stolen Horses". established 1818. Great dinner and better entertainment. Gentleman and gentle man.
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.in...s-paul-mccartney-20221219.html?outputType=amp
 

Edward

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Actually, Edward, they were actively developing a new TV series earlier, in 76/77. When Star Wars (not yet called "Episode IV") exploded on the scene and changed the movie industry, Parmount quickly rejiggered the in-preproduction series into Star Trek: The Motion Picture. (And there are still traces: for example, the new Vulcan science officer who was supposed to replace Spock in the series dies in the transporter accident early in the film.) When TMP was successful enough to spawn the film series, the TV idea was forgotten for a while.

Oh! Interesting - did not know that. TMP remains less well known (and far less often - almost never) screened here in the UK than any of the other films. The orthodoxy perpetuates the notion that it was a diabolical flop, though that doesn't seem to me to line up with the actual facts...

The Next Generation was actually Gene Roddenberry's revenge after having been kicked upstairs to executive producer of the films... where he was no longer their guiding force, Harve Bennett and Nick Meyer were. Roddenberry wanted a Trek series that reflected the future the way HE envisioned it, though some of his main principles (like "no arguments between our lead characters, they are more evolved humans") had to fall by the wayside as he became ill and his control waned.

Eventually, Deep Space Nine was conceived by his successors as the anti-Roddenberry Trek, with a bunch of characters who aren't Starfleet's best and brightest, aren't on an exploration vessel, constantly disagree with one another, are enmeshed in a messy political struggle, display shades-of-gray morality, etc.

It's interesting seeing how these creative divisions impacted the various elements of the franchise. I'm grateful for the variety: I enjoyed all the variations myself, makes the world feel more 'complete'. I'd love to know what Roddenberry would have made of Below Decks.


Sad indeed. I was watching my social media feed the other night as news of this and Pele broke, and couldn't help but think of this....

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Sport or punk rock? The vast majority of my circle fell hard on the latter side, unsurprisingly.
 

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