Does anyone else hate the 'Regards' signature

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by Ticklishchap, Oct 17, 2013.

  1. stevew443

    stevew443 One of the Regulars

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    Where I work the standard is to sign every email with "Very respectfully". Since people tend to be quite lazy with emails, that quickly became "Vr". When I am writing a letter (yes, I still write letters), I will usually end with "Yours truly" unless I wish to have fun with the person to whom I am writing, then I will sign "I am, Sir, Your Most Humble and Obedient Servant:. If I am writing to a close friend, I just skip any ending and sign Steve (instead of Stephen).
     
  2. Michaelson

    Michaelson One Too Many

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    Yep, nothing more than standard email etiquette 101. I've been using it and 'High regards' since 1996, and will continue to do so.

    Regards! Michaelson
     
  3. sheeplady

    sheeplady I'll Lock Up Bartender

    lol... as long as it isn't from a student, I'm fine with later.

    The most disrespectful email I ever got from a student started with "Hey" and ended with "Later." It didn't help that they were asking for a major (and unreasonable) favor. Like the kind where you think you'd want to be on my good side if you have any chance.

    Although my favorite email of all time was sent by a colleague of mine. He had a student at the end of class say to his face, "**** you" and walk out of the classroom, throwing his recently graded paper in this teacher's face. So he sent this student an email the subject line of which was ****, discussed how certain behavior was not appropriate, that he was more than happy to discuss this student's paper in a civilized and adult manner, and ended with "best wishes." It was hilarious. It almost made me want a student to say that to me for the longest time so I could send an email like that. Almost.
     
  4. Feraud

    Feraud Bartender

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    I'm proud to say I picked up the use of "Regards" years ago from pleasant conversations I had with you Michaelson! If I recall correctly you likely gave me generous and sound advice on some detail relating to pocket watches.

    I have absolutely no problem with the use of the term.
     
  5. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap One Too Many

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    That's because I didn't fully explain the facts. Please see my reply to Hudson Hawk. It's interesting the way use of language can be suddenly revealing and tip the balance in a relationship sometimes. It was a kind of eureka moment, when I realised that helping this person was a complete waste of time.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2013
  6. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap One Too Many

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    You are rushing to judgement before you know the facts. That said, I should perhaps have explained them more clearly. In the case of this former friend, I spent many hours trying to sort out his problems. I took him out for meals and picked up the tab. I lent him some money to tide him over, even though he refused my suggestion that he work in a local bookshop because it was 'beneath' him ('I'm an artist', etc.). Also, I let him come and stay for a short time when he was depressed and his girlfriend wouldn't put up with him. Overall, I deserved better than 'Regards' and the cold signature was a kind of epiphany or eureka moment: I realised that I was wasting my time trying to help this person.
    Fortunately, I have enough good friends not to need a sponge.
     
  7. I'm shocked, I tells ya! I, for one, and I'm sure I speak for everyone here, will never feel the same way about you again.

    gents, we have officially entered Bizarro-world. And the psychology of it has the potential to be truly fascinating.

    Bst Rgrds,

    bk
     
  8. rocketeer

    rocketeer Call Me a Cab

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    If I were writing a personal letter or an official email I would try to carefully construct the letter and address it appropriately. Here, on an internet forum where most of us do not know the other members, nor are likely to meet the vast majority, I tend to write as I would if I were speaking.
    Were I answering a general topic I try not to be insulting unless it is something I have had experience at, so always try to be jovial or at least not serious and sign off as such. One problem with eMails is of course the lack of emotion in words, no matter how many 'smileys' you put down they may be interpreted differently. So when I saw this

    QUOTE=HudsonHawk;1700072]
    If you're willing to dismiss a friendship with someone because they used it, you weren't much of a friend in the first place.[/QUOTE]

    I thought, "Damn right too". But then you went on to explain your writings and I could 'sort of' see your point.
    Really though I cannot see anything wrong with the informal sign offs some of us put on here at least. Do you really take your forums that seriously. And you use the term 'Naff', a term I tend to think of used by 1980s comedians like Harry Enfield, and would personally never use but I have no problem with anyone else using it.

    So, cheers and chat here later. (Well not actually chat but you know what I mean. Well, if I am involved in a subject that interests you at least)
    Now, was that genuine or was it sarcasm.
    All the best, John x
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2013
  9. STEVIEBOY1

    STEVIEBOY1 Practically Family

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    That says it all.
     
  10. emigran

    emigran Practically Family

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    Doesn't bother me ... as long as it's not Fond Regards... and speaking of grammar school classes I recall that a signature was significant to the personal relationship referred to... My standard line is... "Ciao for now..." or "Best..." but what do I know...
     
  11. STEVIEBOY1

    STEVIEBOY1 Practically Family

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    I must admit I do use regards often when signing off from an e-mail or text. I suppose modern technology has made us lazy.

    We were taught at school to end official letters by "yours faithfully or yours sincerly" depending if it's addressed to "dear sir, or dear Mr Brown" etc.

    I have seen copies of older letters, upto about the 1950s or 1960s being signed with something like, "Your most humble or obedient servant" etc. That was when service really was service.

    I have been corrected sometimes for other poor use of grammar.

    At school if we made spelling mistakes, we had to copy out the correct spelling of the word (s) 10 times.

    Best wishes.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2013
  12. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    Hey there,
    I completely agree.

    Laters

    Eddie-Baby
     
  13. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

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    We had to do it 100 times at my Jesuit school. And if that didn't improve your spelling they had other methods which were quite painful.:(

    They also had us copy each and every word entry in the dictionary (3x each) in order to expand our vocabulary.

    Both exercises, while extremely tedious, proved to be quite effective.
     
  14. What did you have to do for the "gramma" mistakes?
     
  15. STEVIEBOY1

    STEVIEBOY1 Practically Family

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    Whoops, just testing, better start writing:eek:
     
  16. STEVIEBOY1

    STEVIEBOY1 Practically Family

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    Yes that is quite true, we too used to have to write out large amounts of "lines" for certain wrong doings.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2013
  17. Michaelson

    Michaelson One Too Many

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    I still love 'talking shop' too, old friend! Good to 'see you'. :D

    HIGH regards! Michaelson
     
  18. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap One Too Many

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    I thought, "Damn right too". But then you went on to explain your writings and I could 'sort of' see your point.

    Thanks. In a way, I'm surprised that you could only 'sort of' see my point. ... But to be fair I think that if it hadn't been that signature it would have been something else. ... I was already tired of this 'friend' and his sponging!

    Really though I cannot see anything wrong with the informal sign offs some of us put on here at least. Do you really take your forums that seriously.

    I wasn't referring to anything on the forums - just getting something off my chest about a recent trend in emails, including emails from people I think I know well and would hope for something 'warmer' even if still formal.

    And you use the term 'Naff', a term I tend to think of used by 1980s comedians like Harry Enfield, and would personally never use but I have no problem with anyone else using it.

    Maybe not the best word. I was trying to avoid 'common'. Because that's probably what I really think about 'Regards', 'Kind Regards' etc. It conjures up an image of a sales rep or similar in a cheap blazer, with a comb-over hairstyle and a nasal accent: 'Give my regards to your lady wife'. This is, I would emphasise, an image entirely in the British context and I can accept that the word has different social connotations in the US.


    So, cheers and chat here later. (Well not actually chat but you know what I mean. Well, if I am involved in a subject that interests you at least)
    Now, was that genuine or was it sarcasm.
    All the best, John x[/QUOTE]
    All the best, Aidan x
     
  19. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap One Too Many

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    In the British context, from which I write, I associate the rise of 'Regards' (and its variants) with the rise of an impersonal, process-driven bureaucracy that is increasingly petty and extreme, based on levelling everyone down to a lowest common denominator.

    I appreciate that quite probably none of this applies to the US.
     
  20. I think everyone understands your being tired of someone's sponging. It's your burning hatred for such an innocuous signature that is bizarre.
     

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