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Ever Been On The Radio?

Peacoat

Bartender
Bartender
Messages
5,695
Location
South of Nashville
From 1974 through 1984 I did a blues show on Vanderbilt's radio station. We had a strong transmitter and reached most of Middle Tennessee from Kentucky to Alabama and about 60 miles to the east and about 60 miles to the west.

Because of my knowledge of blues history from the 30s, 40s and 50s, I was a guest on Bill Allen's show on WLAC. Over the years I think I was interviewed three times.

A good medium, that radio.
 

Ticklishchap

One Too Many
Messages
1,567
Location
London
From 1974 through 1984 I did a blues show on Vanderbilt's radio station. We had a strong transmitter and reached most of Middle Tennessee from Kentucky to Alabama and about 60 miles to the east and about 60 miles to the west.

Because of my knowledge of blues history from the 30s, 40s and 50s, I was a guest on Bill Allen's show on WLAC. Over the years I think I was interviewed three times.

A good medium, that radio.
WLAC was internationally renowned for decades as The R&B Station. I speak as a bit of a radio obsessive since my schoolboy days in the 1970s. I think it’s now ‘talk radio’?
 

Ticklishchap

One Too Many
Messages
1,567
Location
London
I have just checked and WLAC is now billed as the station ‘Where Nashville Comes to Talk’. For some reason it doesn’t broadcast to Britain online. If it did, I could now be listening to the Sean Hannity Show. … I am not sorry to be deprived of this privilege.

Listening to worldwide radio is usually easy these days. Too easy in my view: I used to enjoy twisting the old dial on Short Wave and looking for obscure frequencies.
 

M Brown

A-List Customer
Messages
310
Location
N Tx
Yes. I spent almost 30 years in major market radio.
Lots of concerts, musician and actor interviews, and never a dull moment. And I still make my living with a microphone.
 

Peacoat

Bartender
Bartender
Messages
5,695
Location
South of Nashville
WLAC was internationally renowned for decades as The R&B Station. I speak as a bit of a radio obsessive since my schoolboy days in the 1970s. I think it’s now ‘talk radio’?
Yes, it was renowned for R&B. And before that in the 50s, 60s and part of the 70s it was the premier blues station (as well as R&B), reaching most of the country , and parts of the Carribean at night. You will remember Bill "Hoss" Allen, Gene Nobles, Herman Grizzard and the king of them all, John R, with his distinctive voice. I was at his last show on July 28, 1973. That was quite an honor.

I should say that Hoss Allen was the most natural interviewer I have been interviewed by. Sitting down in front of the microphones, he immediately put the interviewee at ease, and one didn't realize one was being interviewed until well into the process. He just eased into the interview. In addition to that, he was a genuinely good guy.

I would occasionally see him at the Nashville blues clubs, and we would always catch up. He had a good radio voice, but it wasn't distinctive, and people around us never caught on as to who the guy on crutches was. My radio voice was different from my conversational voice, and no one recognized me either. Of course I wasn't a living legend, and there was no reason they should.

Not sure what WLAC is now as I quit listening when it went to a format other than music.
 

Gary in NC

Familiar Face
Messages
52
I was a broadcast communication major in the late 80’s at App State University, and was program director for the FM college station WASU during my time there. We were student run with a mostly album rock format. We also did specialty shows for other genres and public affairs programs with a strong sense of community involvement. I loved my time on the radio and had my own afternoon shift during the week.

We used to que up vinyl 45’s on real turntables! We had to understand how to talk over intros without “walking” on the vocals when they started, and how to segue songs with cold endings with no “dead air” in between. Yes, great memories and some lasting friendships - but I don’t think I would like it as well today. It’s so automated now, and internet music streaming just may be the thing that finally “kills the radio star” (reference to the 1979 song “Video Killed the Radio Star” by The Buggles).
 
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