favorite cars of the golden era

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by Styles, Jan 28, 2006.

  1. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    The MG Six as it was first known was introduced at the 1928 Motor Show and accompanied the 14/40 that was now in its fourth year of production. It was becoming apparent that if public interest was to be maintained in the new MG marque that a new model was needed, hence the launch of the 18/80 model. The significance of the 18/80 was that it was the first 'real' MG because the earlier flat radiator and bull nosed cars held such close ties with the Morris equivalents and Cecil Kimber MG's General Manager had up till then been charged with upgrading the Morris' to give them wider appeal. The new 18/80 was a car that could be described as a marque on its own as the vast majority of the mechanical components were totally different to those of the current Morris.
    mg6.jpg
     
  2. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    The very first MG, known as old number one, still exists, It's actually a bull nose Morris, no MG badge of course, it was modified for racing at Morris Garages, that's how it became an MG and how the marque was born.
    ONO.jpg old_no_1.jpg old-number-one.jpg
     
  3. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    Always wanted a MG ever since Love Story. The Ryan O'Neill poor little rich boy Harvard character Ollie,
    born with a silver spoon in his hand and another shoved up his ass, drove one around Cambridge.:cool:
     
  4. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    The affection for the MG marque in the US never ceases to amaze me. One of my most determined to do's on my bucket list is to bring my car Stateside for The Gathering of the Faithful. The love, care and money lavished on these MG cars is incredible.
    https://classicmotorsports.com/news/gof-south-2019/
    Y-type.jpg
     
  5. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    Jaguar remains my first true love. Unfortunately, the Internal Revenue Service and I had a little misunderstanding
    a while ago and my 94 Jag XJS convertible was stolen away from my amorous embrace by this particular suitor.
    Dreams of rebuilding a MG just for the hell-of-it remains fixed on my mind.;)
     
  6. scottyrocks

    scottyrocks I'll Lock Up

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    MGs have always fascinated me. In the U.S., the only tthree models that appeared during my lifetime were the A, B, and Midget. I never saw a whole of any of them, especially the A, as it was replaced by the B when I was 2 years old. But on occasion I would catch a glimpse of a B or Midget, and they always just got me.

    There was a point that I was actively looking to purchase one, but as most everything else I desired back then (mid-to-late '70s), they were way more money than I could come up with. And then my wife (girlfriend at the time) but the kabosh on the whole thing when she took a short drive with me in a steel-bumpered ('72?) Midget, where she told me she would never, ever again get into what was essentially to her a rollerskate. I loved it. 40mph felt like 60 or more in anything else I had driven at that time. Who needs speed to have fun? Not a Midget driver! haha

    I also knew that the upkeep on such cars was way more $$ than what it cost me to keep running the early '70s Toyotas I was driving. And I never had any money to speak of.

    I still don't have one, but with retirement approaching, I may very well sell the Mustang and shop around for a Midget or AH Sprite (very rare here, as they were not imported in any great numbers, if at all). We'll see.
     
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  7. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    The most popular 'B' here in Britain is the one powered by the Buick designed, MG modified, V8 engine. It's not known as the pocket rocket for nothing.
     
  8. St.Ignatz

    St.Ignatz Call Me a Cab

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    20150228_130334.jpg 20191203_170942.jpg
    Squire. The first of few. Hand built and sold for about the same price as a Rolls Royce.

    Tom D.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2020
    Benny Holiday likes this.
  9. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    The ultimate car. I love the colour scheme and the outrageous white soft top.
    duesenberg.jpg
     
  10. St.Ignatz

    St.Ignatz Call Me a Cab

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    Stunner. Your parallel parking skills are surely tested.
     
  11. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

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    106548EA-053D-4135-97EA-47599861FFA2.jpeg 106548EA-053D-4135-97EA-47599861FFA2.jpeg BA604902-9E1E-451B-AFF6-D25D9198E61A.jpeg 3E41E52A-87D4-4ABE-BC6A-E95C013F7EDA.jpeg 02B18C67-4096-4930-9017-FA0FFC5926BD.jpeg 8D42FB61-7D16-4B94-8F06-3F9EBB2FAA25.jpeg Whilst I’ve always been a Ford enthusiast, having taken my driving test in a Model T, and always having had a Flivver or two around the garage, I’ve lately become a big advocate of the mid-1930s MOPAR machines.

    A couple years ago a 1935 Plymouth PJ practically fell into my hands. Ut was a running car, but it had lost its interior in a misguided attempt at hot ridding. The fabric panel in the roof had been replaced with plexiglas. The body is in good condition. The paint shines, overall the car is a “Thirty footer”. It’s not really cost effective to restore such a car, so I’ve been enjoying it just as it is. These mid 1930s Chrysler products are decades ahead of their Ford and GM competition. These conventionally styled cars adopted the Advanced forward cab design Pioneered by the Chrysler airflow. The weight of the engine is more or less centered over the front axle rather than being entirely behind the front axle as well as conventional at the time. The rear axle is placed well behind the rear seat rather than directly underneath it. This makes a passenger compartment which experience is much less rocking motion on rough roads then Was usual with the competition. The bodies on these are all still using unitized construction, where a stiff monocoque shell is fastened at between 50 and 70 points to an equally stiff X braced frame. The result is a car that rides like a lightweight sedan of the 1960s or early 1970s. In fact I am looking for a restored version of one of the scars I Deleigh of course I prefer the eight cylinder Chrysler CV, But dodge De Soto Plymouth any of them would do
     
  12. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

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    Please pardon the eccentric capitalization. Voice to text
     
  13. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    How do you fancy a rather nice pre-war MG? There were three models in a group known as The WA, The SA & The VA. They all look similar but their variations come with engine size and trim level. This particular VA was used by MG in the London Motor Show at Olympia in 1936. It's for sale, your's for just $43,000 plus shipping costs.

    mgva1.jpg mgva2.jpg mgva3.jpg mgva4.jpg mgva5.jpg
     
  14. scottyrocks

    scottyrocks I'll Lock Up

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    I normally don't care for saloons, but that is beautiful.

    But I could never afford to purchase, or maintain a car like that. Low production numbers, almost none of them to the U.S., and lots of changes during its short production surely means difficult parts availability and great expense when they can be found.

    And the steering wheel is on the wrong side. ;)
     
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  15. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    Steering wheel on the wrong side? Who told you that? I saw a brilliant send up of the local authority on a Pennsylvania web site. It read: "In the UK they drive on the left side of the road. Here in Pennsylvania, we drive on what's left of the road." There followed a photo of just about the most pot-holed road you have ever seen.
     
  16. scottyrocks

    scottyrocks I'll Lock Up

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    Yes, PA is kind of famous here, as well, for its lousy roads.
     
  17. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    mg and hat.jpg
    An MG with a hat wearing lady. The car is almost 100 years young. The lady a little less so.

    MG & Hat.jpg
    Nowadays, the Chinese SAIC company own the rights to the MG marque. Not so though, the lady in a hat.
    Some images are simply timeless.
     
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  18. Turnip

    Turnip One Too Many

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    More kind of a hybrid but I would give a lot to get my hands on one is a Kettenkrad.

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. scottyrocks

    scottyrocks I'll Lock Up

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    Does that model come with the model? Or does the model come with the model?
     
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  20. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    Good question, much as I like my old MG, there is one car, from the era, that Uncle Sam produced that knocks everything else into a cocked hat.
    Duesenberg_Convertible.jpg
    A 1935 Duesenberg SJ LaGrande Dual-Cowl Phaeton.
    (Quite a catchy name, don't you think?)
     
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