Want to buy or sell something? Check the classifieds

Filson coats - anyone?

Ernest P Shackleton

One Too Many
Messages
1,187
Location
Midwest
One of the reasons wool is such a great and preferred fiber in wetter conditions is that it can absorb up to 60% of its weight and still feel dry to the touch and continues to perform as normal. In the 80s, National Geographic did a big piece, with a supplementary pamphlet, on wool. They showed wool fibers magnified many times over. It is fascinating.

https://nationalgeographicbackissues.com/national-geographic-may-1988.html
 

AlexB

One of the Regulars
Messages
282
Location
Berlin
I just spent months with trying to find a new winter jacket. It started out with what I don’t want: Right now you leave your apartment and the only thing you see is Canada Goose and Patagonia down jackets. Probably both very functional, but not my kind of jacket and style.

More or less by accident I stepped into the Filson store close to Union Square. I tried a couple of jackets - as always too short in the arms. Then I was pointed to a double-Mac in a tall/ long version. From my perspective the fit is spot on.
First I was concerned the the jacket might be not warm enough for the NYC winter but retrospect I have to say that I love the jacket.

I just came back from a hiking trip Upstate. The jacket is not only warm, but super breathable. It keeps you dry! Also rain is no issue. Overall, an insanely expensive jacket, but considering that I normally have a hard time finding clothes fitting from the rack, I am more than happy with this functional but yet beautiful timeless piece of clothing.

8a2ee2c2a0458718d6b471d2fcdafb74.jpg



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Gav

Practically Family
Messages
503
Location
UK
I've been following this thread with interest.
I have a few Filson jackets and a vest which I love.
Lately, this Jac-Shirt has caught my eye: https://www.filson.com/mackinaw-jac-shirt-11010788.html#sku=11010788-fco-007524806
What do you all think of it? Aside from the lack of lower pockets and its flannel lining, it seems to be very similar to the Mackinaw Wool Cruiser. Anybody own one?
I’ve got one of those. It is good. Simpler than the mackinaw and using pendleton wool. It is lined too which makes it feel warmer and wear easier.
Having said all that I bought a sheepskin shortly after and will probably not use the filson so much.
 

Peacoat

Bartender
Bartender
Messages
5,892
Location
South of Nashville
I have a charcoal Filson Mackinaw. It is advertised as a 24 oz. jacket, but feels lighter than that. Not warm at all and not lined. The plaids are advertised as 26 oz. If I had it to do over, I would have gotten a double Mackinaw in a plaid. I have an old Woolrich (1980s) in the red plaid, and is lined. It feels to be about 28 oz, and is fairly warm. It's what I think a Mackinaw should be.
 

Ernest P Shackleton

One Too Many
Messages
1,187
Location
Midwest
We should acknowledge that, if you're willing to dig on the used market, there are many other very high quality options to Filson. All variables considered, I personally feel Filson is the gold standard of the cruiser//double cruiser/mackinaw design, but there were several companies and mills making these styles up through probably the 1980s that would not disappoint. The best designed double cruiser/mackinaw I've ever seen wasn't a Filson.
 

belfastboy

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,830
Location
vancouver, canada
I've been following this thread with interest.
I have a few Filson jackets and a vest which I love.
Lately, this Jac-Shirt has caught my eye: https://www.filson.com/mackinaw-jac-shirt-11010788.html#sku=11010788-fco-007524806
What do you all think of it? Aside from the lack of lower pockets and its flannel lining, it seems to be very similar to the Mackinaw Wool Cruiser. Anybody own one?
I don't own one but I do own 2 Pendleton 100% wool shirts (without flannel lining). Here is the mild NW they are perfect as a light jacket over a long sleeve T. If the temp drops they are still light enough to fit under a jacket and together withstand a lot of cold.
 

belfastboy

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,830
Location
vancouver, canada
We should acknowledge that, if you're willing to dig on the used market, there are many other very high quality options to Filson. All variables considered, I personally feel Filson is the gold standard of the cruiser//double cruiser/mackinaw design, but there were several companies and mills making these styles up through probably the 1980s that would not disappoint. The best designed double cruiser/mackinaw I've ever seen wasn't a Filson.
I am on the lookout for a good Bimidji Woolen Mills mackinaw.....mostly because I love the name.
 

belfastboy

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,830
Location
vancouver, canada
One of the reasons wool is such a great and preferred fiber in wetter conditions is that it can absorb up to 60% of its weight and still feel dry to the touch and continues to perform as normal. In the 80s, National Geographic did a big piece, with a supplementary pamphlet, on wool. They showed wool fibers magnified many times over. It is fascinating.

https://nationalgeographicbackissues.com/national-geographic-may-1988.html
Reading a book on outdoor survival (by the warmth of a fire....inside my house) where they talked about the virtues of wool. On the other hand they referred to cotton as "death cloth" to an outdoorsman.
 

Seb Lucas

I'll Lock Up
Messages
7,573
Location
Australia
I found the tin cruiser works best for heavy brush i.e. Timber cruiser work.
Most clothing will shred to pieces when off the trail in my area of Washington state. With double tin, I can walk straight through the brush and nothing sticks, stabs or snags.
I wouldn't consider tin cloth as good material for street wear.

It seems barely tough enough for street wear, so I am surprised to hear this. It's just a tucker jacket in a light weight waxed cotton. I've had it two or three years and can report it has survived my fish and chips down on the bay.
 
Last edited:

So33

One of the Regulars
Messages
153
Location
Seattle
It seems barely tough enough for street wear, so I am surprised to hear this. It's just a tucker jacket in a light weight waxed cotton. I've had it two or three years and can report it has survived my fish and chips down on the bay.
Filson has for the most part 3 levels of oil cloth, cover cloth being lightweight, shelter cloth a medium weight and tin cloth the heaviest. They also had soy wax, which was always only in lightweight clothes.
I've seen many times on 2ndary listings the term tin cloth misapplied.
 

Seb Lucas

I'll Lock Up
Messages
7,573
Location
Australia
Filson has for the most part 3 levels of oil cloth, cover cloth being lightweight, shelter cloth a medium weight and tin cloth the heaviest. They also had soy wax, which was always only in lightweight clothes.
I've seen many times on 2ndary listings the term tin cloth misapplied.

Woah there partner; nothing has been misapplied. My jacket is made of tin cloth. It's a 15oz weight waxed cotton. I find it an unimpressive fabric. My heavyweight Dirzabone, although no thicker, seems far more robust.
 

EmergencyIan

Practically Family
Messages
918
Location
New York, NY
While, I love Filson and the romanticism of it being produced in Seattle. I own the last of their sweaters that’s manufactured in the United States. It’s VERY nice and extremely well made. The other 3 sweaters are made in Scotland. All are very nice, but none as nice or as well made as the first sweater that I mentioned. I do own one if their jackets/coats. It is made in the United States of imported materials. It is a nice jacket, but a long way from the nicest or most well made of this type of jacket I own. I fear that Filson is headed in the same direction/business model as L.L. Bean.

- Ian
 

ShadowBoxer

Familiar Face
Messages
55
Location
Los Angeles, California
Hi,

I've been looking for a Mackinaw for a while. Got a Filson off eBay but it was too small. Also faded and the fabric did not feel particularly thick.

Last week I got another one for a little more. It is not faded. It actually looks almost brand new. There is some fraying at the edge of one pocket flap (the lining. I don't think the wool is broken). The only problem is that the body is too wide. I'm going to try to have it tailored a bit, maybe taken in 3/4" on each side or so, since this is one of the few jackets, shirts, etc. that I have where the sleeves are actually long enough. It's one of my problems in general. The sleeves are perfect but the body is too big or the body is fine but the sleeves are short.

One thing I'd ask here, is there is any way to know how old the jacket is?
988DE6E0-9E74-4EA5-A0A6-ADF7C42F9A1D-L.jpg
FF8BE98C-4181-4A77-A439-B18545639701-L.jpg
DD5276CB-C8D6-48AF-842F-D54F11C43CA7-L.jpg


I see here a lot mentioned of the fabric weight; 24 or 26oz, etc. The first jacket I got seems to be thinner. I don't know what this one is but it's plenty warm. I walked to the tailor's today and just standing there, now inside, I started to get hot. I was also wearing my Filson Western vest which I like a lot. I also don't know how old that is. After I left I walked to the coffee shop and never really cooled down. However when I left it was now dark and the jacket and vest were perfect all the way home. I also have been wearing my Langlitz Westerns which are far warmer than just a pair of jeans. The lows this week are supposed to be in the low 50˚s

Anyone know how to date these Filson labels?
Cheers.
 

Peter Mackin

Practically Family
Messages
910
Location
glasgow
Had the misfortune to purchase a Filson tin cloth packer from the forum a couple of years ago.Useless to be honest not warm ,not waterproof,not breathable & poorly constructed.It was unused but I treated it with filson proofing to try get some wear out of it,,in the end it had to go,,the most uncomfortable jacket I have ever owned,drizabone,Barbour etc knock it out the park,,just my opinion,have never tried their wool clothing but it’s got to be better than tin cloth ,
 
Last edited:

AeroFan_07

I'll Lock Up
Messages
4,783
Location
Iowa
I've wondered much the same thing Shadowboxer, I know yours, being a numeric number (44) size is before they changed over to S-M-L-XL siaing. About a year or two after they were bought out the last time.

As far as the material, warmth, etc. It's certianly going to be a different beast than a North Face or much of any "modern" jacket. These un-lined cruisers, both waxed cotton and heavy wool are essentially un-changed since the early 1900's in thier design & construction. I have one of each, along with a wool vest similar to your (Shadowboxer) and while I don't use them often, I find them appealing for certain uses. Much like a Carhartt coat is not an everyday for me, it serves a purpose for certain times & activites that are sometimes hard to quantify. I have used the waxed cotton coat over leather jackets in downpours for periods of time and found the leather never even got wet.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
102,890
Messages
2,920,348
Members
49,819
Latest member
Cuvier
Top