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Filson coats - anyone?

cordwangler

One of the Regulars
Messages
187
Location
UK
Can anyone tell me where the 'Tin Cloth' comes into it? Looks like waxed to me. Not been able to reference it, every google query just comes up with adverts.
Seems a silly name if there is no 'tin' connection. But maybe it's just me:(

I guess 'tin' is a colloquial way of saying 'hard-wearing'. ... unlike all the other makers of true metal pants.

I'm not sure you'd make a convincing case under any Sale of Goods Act :)

Filson make great quality coats and vests. I've worn a wool cruiser most cold days the past 9 years, and it's just starting to show its age in wear around the cuffs and elbows. Good protection against cold and rain. As said above, the turnaround time for drying out makes it very usable in intermittent rainy cold for quite long periods - like half a day to a day's walking around in the open. Perfect for UK outdoors.

I got a wool-lined tin cloth vest last year, and it's proving a great winter extra layer.
 
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Lookaholic

New in Town
Messages
9
It looks pretty good for moderate wetness ... short walks in a downpour or longer is light rain. I have a wool Double mack cruiser, the lighter oiled (shelter?) cloth cruiser (that's the smelly one) and a tin oiled duster. Tin is very stiff and heavy, and it's not really warmer because none of the oiled cloths breathe like a modern water resistant fabric ... so you're often adjusting for ventilation. Layering is good because pulling on a cold Filson on a damp day is like putting on a canvass diving rig ... well, not that bad but you get the idea. The Filson wool liners plus the tin cloth is Rodney the Robot stiff even when beaten into submission by years of use. Tin cloth is great if you wear it for protection on a motorcycle or think you're going to damage yourself with a tool but other than that it's my recommendation to stay away from it. You'll find others that swear by it, of course.

I've found that the wool is useful in a limited amount of rain, it soaks it up but, if given long enough, dries out just fine. It's the turn around time that is critical.

A dry shelter cloth (or whatever their medium weight cloth is called) double cruiser would be my next choice. It's tight enough to be better in the rain than the wool and you might find an oil or water resistant treatment that didn't stink like a hairless zombie hound.

Of course Barbour makes oiled cloth jackets, some in pretty traditional styling, and they don't smell.
Thanks for the information! I ended up deciding on a Barbour Prestbury waxed jacket. I have yet to see it in person as i ordered it on sierratradingpost.com but from what it looked like and the reviews, it should stand well to my purposes. As to the smell, I don't think it would really bother me, but I have never owned something that smelled so I do not know if that would change.
 

Fanch

I'll Lock Up
Messages
4,492
Location
Texas
Barbour also makes very good waxed coats as well as Filson. I have never been able to wear a Barbour because of my long arms but am able to wear Filson since some of their coats come in "extra long" size.
 

MikeKardec

One Too Many
Messages
1,137
Location
Los Angeles
Barbour also makes very good waxed coats as well as Filson. I have never been able to wear a Barbour because of my long arms but am able to wear Filson since some of their coats come in "extra long" size.

That's also why I bought Filson and would again as long as I stick with their wool coats. I have a friend who has a Filson duffle and it makes anything packed inside it smell. Beautifully built, just smelly. I'd love to find a way to take the smell out of my canvas jacket, I haven't worn it in years.
 

rocketeer

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,612
Location
England
I guess 'tin' is a colloquial way of saying 'hard-wearing'. ... unlike all the other makers of true metal pants.

I'm not sure you'd make a convincing case under any Sale of Goods Act :)

Filson make great quality coats and vests. I've worn a wool cruiser most cold days the past 9 years, and it's just starting to show its age in wear around the cuffs and elbows. Good protection against cold and rain. As said above, the turnaround time for drying out makes it very usable in intermittent rainy cold for quite long periods - like half a day to a day's walking around in the open. Perfect for UK outdoors.

I got a wool-lined tin cloth vest last year, and it's proving a great winter extra layer.
I knew a fashion conscious youngster who bought a jacket made from stainless steel thread, it was welded rather than stitched cost around £500 from Japan around 10 years ago.

Bought myself a near new(worn about half dozen times) Barbour wax coat to go beating pheasant and partridge this winter. Not bad for £30, new they go for £250 and you have to buy the hood as an extra :(
Never had a Belstaff or Barbour before as I always thought they looked dirty from day 1, don't know how actually waterproof they are either. Just need the Harris Tweed cap now.
J
 

Lookaholic

New in Town
Messages
9
Well, I got my Barbour Prestbury yesterday, and must say I love it! I have not actually used it yet, as the weather took a 'bad' turn and is now about 80 degrees F in Northern/Central OH. I have tried it on, and I must say it fits pretty well. The arms are actually kind of long, until I reach out, in which case they are slightly short. It does have a slight smell when putting my nose to it, but I can't smell anything otherwise. It is Sylkoil though, and not the wax variant. It is a good weight for the weather I originally intended, and I should be able to layer in cooler weather. I doubt I will wear it in dead of winter type weather, as I have an Arctic-quilt lining Carhartt jacket I bought for about $70 from Cabela's in Dundee, MI a few years ago, which is unbelievably warm in all the weather I've worn it in. The Barbour only has a thin quilt lining, kind of what you might find in a modern parka, but much thinner. I think it was very much worth the cost, as I got it about 68% off.
 

Short Balding Guy

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,310
Location
Minnesota, USA
Offering some Filson love today.

Bomber worn this morning.

i-Tq79Kk3-M.jpg


Cape coat and vest worn during a walk late morning.

i-LRrSXMx-M.jpg


i-TVtM27f-M.jpg


Best, Eric -
 

l0fielectronic

Practically Family
Messages
667
Location
UK
For those of us in the UK, where Filson has very little distribution, I see stylecreep.com have several Filson Jackets and items on sale this weekend.
 

Michael R.

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,888
Location
West Tennessee USA
I waited a bit too long to ask , and now its pretty cool out (especially in the evening) , but I've been looking at Filson Mackinaw Western Vests , but I can't decide what size . Missed a Large and a seriously Great Deal on a Medium . I wear a 44 , but I'm short (44 short in a suit) and normally skinny , but I have gained a ton since last year . I've had to abandon my 30 and 32 waist jeans for the 34s . So the Large look big in the waist area , but I know they're made to layer underneath and still have movement . Here wearing wool it normally isn't necessary , maybe a thermal long sleeve undershirt between me and a normal , or flannel shirt . Its a gamble either way . I thought about it and found this Thread , thought the guys with experience might help a bro out with their thoughts . A 42 Carhart Canvas Lined Jacket is just too snug to move in , the chest and arm pits are too binding . But a vest that's over sized might still work like the Filson , no arms and shoulder restraint in a vest . Enquiring minds are looking for opinions in the know .
 

Fanch

I'll Lock Up
Messages
4,492
Location
Texas
I have several Filson vests, including a Mackinaw western vest that is a large size. As a point of reference I wear a 44 long sports coat. My moleskin vests are all size 42. Fortunately I was able to size myself at a Filson store.
 

l0fielectronic

Practically Family
Messages
667
Location
UK
Slightly hard to follow but if it helps, I'm normally a 44 in suits and I have the wool Western Vest in XL. There is a little room in it and I might have got away with a Large, however I find it comfortable to move and work in as it is (I should add its normally worn over a shirt and an undershirt), and I think for me while a smaller size might've looked better, I would have found it too restrictive.
 

Short Balding Guy

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,310
Location
Minnesota, USA
I waited a bit too long to ask , and now its pretty cool out (especially in the evening) , but I've been looking at Filson Mackinaw Western Vests , but I can't decide what size . Missed a Large and a seriously Great Deal on a Medium . I wear a 44 , but I'm short (44 short in a suit) and normally skinny , but I have gained a ton since last year . I've had to abandon my 30 and 32 waist jeans for the 34s . So the Large look big in the waist area , but I know they're made to layer underneath and still have movement . Here wearing wool it normally isn't necessary , maybe a thermal long sleeve undershirt between me and a normal , or flannel shirt . Its a gamble either way . I thought about it and found this Thread , thought the guys with experience might help a bro out with their thoughts . A 42 Carhart Canvas Lined Jacket is just too snug to move in , the chest and arm pits are too binding . But a vest that's over sized might still work like the Filson , no arms and shoulder restraint in a vest . Enquiring minds are looking for opinions in the know .

Sir; My vest and Makinaw jackets are one size smaller than my suit jackets. I am a short balding guy and my sizing experiences may not help immensely. The smaller/higher arm holes in the vest, in my experience, fit like a bespoke suit jacket. I can lift my arms and the vest does not move around-very comfortable.

Eric -
 

Michael R.

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,888
Location
West Tennessee USA
I have several Filson vests, including a Mackinaw western vest that is a large size. As a point of reference I wear a 44 long sports coat. My moleskin vests are all size 42. Fortunately I was able to size myself at a Filson store.

Slightly hard to follow but if it helps, I'm normally a 44 in suits and I have the wool Western Vest in XL. There is a little room in it and I might have got away with a Large, however I find it comfortable to move and work in as it is (I should add its normally worn over a shirt and an undershirt), and I think for me while a smaller size might've looked better, I would have found it too restrictive.

Sir; My vest and Makinaw jackets are one size smaller than my suit jackets. I am a short balding guy and my sizing experiences may not help immensely. The smaller/higher arm holes in the vest, in my experience, fit like a bespoke suit jacket. I can lift my arms and the vest does not move around-very comfortable.

Eric -

Thanks guys , sounds like the Large is the best bet in the Mackinaw Western , with a 42 in the Mole Skin if I go for one of them . Bespoke suits had that more tailored fit .
 
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Lookaholic

New in Town
Messages
9
Anyone know of any Black Friday deals on Filson, or best online discount dealers? Thx
Filson rarely goes on sale, no matter the holiday. If you find something on sale brand new, you may be a lucky person.as to dealers, there really arent that many, to my knowledge, that sell Filson any cheaper than retail.
 

52Styleline

A-List Customer
Messages
321
Location
SW WA
Worf said: "Can anyone tell me where the 'Tin Cloth' comes into it? Looks like waxed to me. Not been able to reference it, every google query just comes up with adverts.
Seems a silly name if there is no 'tin' connection. But maybe it's just me"


Loggers wore rain gear called "tin" pants and coats here in the NorthWET from the early years of the industry. They were coats and trousers of stout material (usually heavy canvas) soaked in paraffin for waterproofing. Heavily waxed (tin) hats were also a usual component of a logger's attire in the rainy season but beginning in the 1940's loggers began wearing tin hats that were really made of metal.

One story I heard as a youngin' was they were called that because they made the wearer walk like the tin man in the Wonderful Wizard of Oz. The Frank Baum story was published in 1900 so that could explain the term coming into common use well before the movie.

In reality, it may actually be that the coats and pants were called "tin" simply because they were so stiff. In the general store of the logging camp where I grew up, they often had a sales display consisting of a pair of tin pants standing up with no external support.....they were that stiff.
 
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