French Peasant Workwear Trousers

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by Deleted member 16736, May 7, 2017.

  1. From an eBay listing. Who makes pants like this anymore? They're so peasant chic.

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  2. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    SJC are working up something similar at present. Darcyclothing.com also do blue cotton work pants/ jackets which are designed to fade like this.
     
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  3. Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
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  4. Here's another vintage pair on eBay with cinchback and fishtail similar to the Darcy trousers.

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  5. Cocker

    Cocker Practically Family

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    Might give a go at the Pike Brothers one in khaki. Really love their line of clothes.
     
  6. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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    Bleu de travail. It really was not so long ago when it was a common sight to see workers in Europe wearing such blue trousers and matching work jackets. Often with a cap of the same material. It was a uniform of sorts. I certainly remember them, and I don't think they have completely gone away.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2017
  7. Polterer

    Polterer New in Town

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    You can still get them new. I buy jackets (vestes) and trousers made by Lafont, and these are the real moleskin. I also buy NOS items, when they come in my size, from a contact in France who specialises in bleus de travail.

    The nearest equivalent I know of in the UK which are affordable work clothes rather than expensive hipster fashion versions of those, are the Yarmo brand dark blue or khaki heavy cotton twill trousers, shirts and engineers jackets made in England by, and sold by Yarmouth Stores in Norfolk.

    There are still a number of French manufacturers who make the modern equivalents of the old bleus de travail, which are similar in style but now made in polycottons and so forth.

    You may have guessed that I'm a fan of these clothes, and they're what I wear annually, from about May to September.
     
  8. Thanks for the tip. Now we know what to call them: bleus de travail.

    Here's a pair of "Moleskine Vintage Pants" (no brace buttons). (Note the pair of Paraboot moccasins the model is wearing to complete the look.)

    http://www.bleudetravail.com/lbr-01-500.htm

    Here's a very nice pair of brown corduroy work pants with belt-loops:

    http://www.jmw-vpc.com/velvet-pants-right-passers-1813.html#/960-size-34/922-color-brown

    or braces and back-strap:

    http://www.bleudetravail.com/lbr-01-7t.htm

    A pair of linen-cotton brown work trousers with braces and fish-tail back:

    http://www.jmw-vpc.com/pantalon-en-lin-le-laboureur-taille-38-2581.html

    And finally, a pair of 100% cotton work pants with a slim leg, but fairly high rise, like 60's workwear pants:

    http://www.bleudetravail.com/lbr-01-17.htm

    All of the above are made in France by Le Laboureur, a family-owned company. International shipping is a flat 25 euros from the jmw-vpc.com website.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 25, 2017
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  9. Last edited by a moderator: May 25, 2017
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  10. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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    Last edited: May 25, 2017
  11. SpeedRcrX

    SpeedRcrX One Too Many

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    Those kind of pants and jackets are often given to workers in factories.

    My father has several still in good condition (he is retired) and still use them when he work outside the house.

    But no one in France would wear them outside the workplace.
     
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  12. SpeedRcrX

    SpeedRcrX One Too Many

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    For those interested a few photos of my father's bleus de travail

    The overall, my father also have a jumpsuit
    [​IMG]


    The pant and jacket
    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    My father has a few he never used, you just have to remove the company's patch. So, if you're interested PM me.
     
  13. SpeedRcrX

    SpeedRcrX One Too Many

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    They're just cotton with a denim like texture, the company gave them freely to workers, so it's not high end quality. But it's sturdy and do the job.

    The blue color is a standard color for this kind of clothes, you can also find grey and green colors.
     
  14. I believe Le Laboureur makes pants in a darker shade of blue, but I don't know if the ones for sale on the bleu de travail website is the dark version or light. They do have a black pair of 15 oz. moleskin pants here:

    http://www.bleudetravail.com/lbr-01-500.htm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 28, 2017
  15. Polterer

    Polterer New in Town

    Messages:
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    With the vestes (jackets), I find the shape and stitching of the collar makes a lot of difference to the look of it. Some have a more rounded look, with double stitching on the edge, whilst others are not edge-sewn, are less rounded and usually not as high or wide.
    The photograph shows my vintage NOS "L'Ange Bleu" (Blue Angel) brand at top, which is now showing signs of the wear I've given it. The one below is a "L'Ascenseur", without edge-stitch, and in a much lighter weight moleskin.
    I first came across these work clothes when I went on holiday to France in 1972. I'm interested in @SpeedRcrX 's comments about wearing them outside work. I spent many years as a full-time fisherman, when we used to wear "slops" (aka "smocks") to sea, and when we went for a beer or two on the way home. Often seaside visitors in the pub admired these, especially faded ones with waterproof sleeves, and I've sold more than a few straight off my back (fish scales and smell included) for a few quid. When a lot of folks who'd never been near a fishing vessel started posing in slops, most of us just took them off before going anywhere. I wore my bleus de travails instead.

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  16. SpeedRcrX

    SpeedRcrX One Too Many

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    Most workers change before leaving the workplace. The only people I can see wearing them casually are really old people. But they are very few.

    For example, you won't see a firefighter in full uniform strolling around.

    Work clothes are just that clothes for work [emoji16] at least in France.

    Just look around instagram the only people wearing les bleus casually are foreigners, French people wearing them are either at work or they're going to paint a room or doing some crafts.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2017
  17. The wool coat is dressier than the chore coat, for sure.

    Here's a picture of the brown wool coat being worn with casual attire:

    https://www.greatdixtershop.co.uk/PBSCProduct.asp?ItmID=18433806

    And a photo essay of both coats being worn casually around town. The wool coat is not only warm, but looks downright chic.

    https://www.handeyesupply.com/blogs...adventuring-le-laboureur-with-michael-kingery
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 28, 2017
  18. SpeedRcrX

    SpeedRcrX One Too Many

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    Those jackets don't look like you're typical bleu. Of course, these models can be wear casually, no one will look at you funny in these colors.

    This is Jean-Luc Mélenchon, a French politician, he wears the Laboureur jacket but not in blue and it goes with his style since he's from a far-left party.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2017
  19. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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    [​IMG]
     

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