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Fringe on an adult leather jacket

Peter Bowden

Practically Family
Messages
593
Location
united kingdom
@Big J
Hi-I had a trip to Japan in 1994-Fantastic but don't recall Nagano.My experience with rain capes is from watching the Seven Samurai more times than I can remember.As for the physics....well,I dont know.If it was good enough for Mifune it's good enough for me.Actually he wears a fantastic suit in Drunken Angel but that's another story.
 

steve u

A-List Customer
Messages
350
Location
iowa
Big J, I was in Nagano in 2004, 06 , 08 , 10 , 12 . My wife and kids have spent the last 7 summers , including this year(mid May to Aug.) their. steve
 

Big J

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,966
Location
Japan
@Peter, Steve, I remembered that a Lounger on another thread recently spoke about living in Nagano. I can't remember who it was. Sorry, I'm pretty bad with names, dates, addresses, phone numbers, pretty much everything!
Nagano is nice though.
 

scottyrocks

I'll Lock Up
Messages
9,060
Location
Isle of Langerhan, NY
Like anything ans everything else, it all comes down to personal taste and garment details.

There's tons of pictures of stuff posted all over this forum that I wouldn't be caught dead in. There are tons of cars posted in all the auto forums and groups I'm on that I wouldn't be seen tied to the hood of. But people like what they like, and that's (should be) enough.

At the same time, I never post asking what people think of anything I own or am looking to buy because the responses will be opinions, and they will be all over the place, as they always are. And just because someone likes or doesn't like something doesn't mean I will or won't.

All that being said, I have two jackets with fringes. One is my Daniel Boone/Davy Crockett suede that I got in the 1980s (and still fit into perfectly, thankyouverymuch), and a black leather motorcycle jacket.

The black one, I'm looking to sell. I put it on, and it's like, nah! The brown suede I still enjoy wearing, and get compliments on almost every time I wear it. But even without compliments, I just like the way it looks, and looks on me. It's not over-the-top, so to speak. It's basically the original style fringed suede jacket, and that works for me (and my tastes) best.

Maybe others like it. Maybe others hate it. Maybe others are indifferent. Okay. I like it. That's what matters.
 
Messages
15,643
More rarely seen were Western wear suede types, which were mostly worn by guys trying to fool themselves that they looked like Denis Hopper in Easy Rider, when in reality they were more Doris Day in Calamity Jane. Hell, even Dennis Hopper only got away with it because Fonda looked so square next to him (plus Hopper's bike was by far the cooler of the two).
Still rockin the Easy Rider look since 1969. And so does a man that I have a great deal of respect & admiration for.

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ClassyMica

New in Town
Messages
18
Location
Houston, TX
I never was much of a fringed suede jacket fan, but that Scully looks fantastic to me. These type jackets were popular here in the states mainly during the late '60s and early '70s. Worn by Hippies.
HD

I agree the Scully looks really cool! I saw a picture of my dad wearing one of these with all his "hippy" friends. I thought it was really cool that he used to have style :)
 
Messages
15,643
Fraid I'll have to plead ignorance on this one - who he?
Criminal trial lawyer.

https://www.spencelawyers.com/attorneys/gerry-l-spence/

Some of Gerry Spence's high-profile cases:

* 1974 - The Karen Silkwood case; won $10.5 million on behalf of her children.

* 1979 - Won the acquittal of Ed Cantrell, a Rock Springs law enforcement officer who was charged with murder.

* 1981 - Represented former Miss Wyoming Kimberli Pring against Penthouse magazine - won $26.5 million for defamation.

* 1984 - McDonald's case; received a $52 million verdict against McDonald's Corp. on behalf of a family-owned ice cream company for breach of an oral contract.

* 1990 - Imelda Marcos; won acquittal of the former Filipino first lady on racketeering charges.

* 1992 - Emotional damages; won a record-breaking $15 million verdict for a quadriplegic client whose insurance company failed to pay a $50,000 policy 20 years earlier. Two weeks later $18.5 million was added in punitive damages.

* 1993 - Ruby Ridge trial; won exoneration of Randy Weaver on murder, assault, conspiracy and gun charges in the famous Idaho federal standoff case.

* 2006 - Mayfield case; at the age of 77, Spence represented attorney Brandon Mayfield, whom the FBI arrested after mistakenly linking him to the 2004 Madrid train bombings. Mayfield received a $2 million settlement and an almost-unheard-of formal apology from the federal government.

* 2008 - Geoffrey Fieger; at the age of 79, Spence won the full acquittal of Fieger, who was charged with 10 counts of conspiring to donate more than $125,000 to former Sen. John Edwards' presidential campaign.
 

tropicalbob

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,956
Location
miami, fl
I think the popularity of the fringe jackets in the late '60's was largely due to the abundance of cowboy shows on TV during the 1950's. When I saw the the two RL jackets above my first reaction was "Wild Bill Hickock" and then "Wagon Train."
 

Bugguy

Practically Family
Messages
509
Location
Nashville, TN
I think the popularity of the fringe jackets in the late '60's was largely due to the abundance of cowboy shows on TV during the 1950's. When I saw the the two RL jackets above my first reaction was "Wild Bill Hickock" and then "Wagon Train."


I remember seeing pictures of Wild Bill Hickok in fringe...

Here's Guy Madison as Wild Bill:

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Takeaway... Hollywood thought they were pretty authentic.

I like the comments about pulling the water off the fabric. I can wrap my head around that
 

IXL

One Too Many
Messages
1,284
Location
Oklahoma
I have a fringed leather jacket but only wear it for some of the Cowboy Action shooting competitions, when I'm doing the Wild Bill Hickok thing. The rest of the time I'm post Civil War lawman. The fringe jacket works pretty well with an 1865 era Mexican twin-loop cross-draw rig, featuring a 3 1/2" wide belt. Yeehaw!
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
23,139
Location
London, UK
Criminal trial lawyer.

Thanks. Interesting range of clients!

I think the popularity of the fringe jackets in the late '60's was largely due to the abundance of cowboy shows on TV during the 1950's. When I saw the the two RL jackets above my first reaction was "Wild Bill Hickock" and then "Wagon Train."

Doubtless so. I can see how the hippy movement, with which they also became associated, could put its own spin on the idea of the Great American West and Freedom.

Hendrix wore 'em too, though I believe that was more a nod to his own Cherokee heritage (if memory serves, his grandmother was a full-blooded Cherokee).

I like the comments about pulling the water off the fabric. I can wrap my head around that

To my mind it makes a lot of sense from pov of this stuff having, as I understand it, originated with the First Nation people.

I don't know. The only guy in history who could pull this off:
View attachment 118839

Mn. Well.

Still a vastly cooler bike than Fonda's, though.

imo, fringe is a hairstyle, not a jacket style :rolleyes::p:confused:

A jacket like that is the only way I'm likely to have any fringe ever again....
 
Messages
15,643
Thanks. Interesting range of clients!
Spence also successfully defended Lee Harvey Oswald in Showtime's 5-1/2 hr mock trial program produced in 1986, "On Trial: Lee Harvey Oswald". Vincent Bugliosi was the losing prosecutor. An interesting program, some 23 yrs after the assassination & subsequent investigation.
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
23,139
Location
London, UK
Spence also successfully defended Lee Harvey Oswald in Showtime's 5-1/2 hr mock trial program produced in 1986, "On Trial: Lee Harvey Oswald". Vincent Bugliosi was the losing prosecutor. An interesting program, some 23 yrs after the assassination & subsequent investigation.

That really would have been interesting to see. Whether Oswald was involved or not (I've always suspected it was at least possible he was something of a Van der Lubbe), somebody somewhere wanted him silenced. I've always wondered what somebody had on Jack Ruby for him to be desperate enough to commit murder on live television, with no hope of getting away with it!
 
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