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Golden Age Mini-Series

Flanderian

Practically Family
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833
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Flanders, NJ, USA
Part 1 of 2.

These illustrations are from a 1935 catalog of an unknown maker. While I'm not certain, my surmise is that it was a wholesale catalog, rather than intended for the retail customer. I'm not certain because during that era in the U.S. farming was still a major occupation, and a larger percentage of the population still lived in rural areas, some of them remote. A significant mail order business had by then become common to serve them. And a greater diversity of forms and options might well have been ordered directly by retail mail-order customers. And it is precisely this variety of details and forms that I find make the illustrations so interesting and informative.


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Tiki Tom

Call Me a Cab
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Oahu, North Polynesia
Yeah, the legs on those guys are so long that they reach the floor! Tall, slim, and wealthy is a winning combo every time.

I like the detail panels showing the seems, far above. Gives you a real sense of how they would fit.
 

Fastuni

Call Me a Cab
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2,278
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Germany
Seven illustrations apparently from a catalog, and of unknown origin. Printed in 2 color ink. (Alternately, The Very Tall Well Dressed Men! ;))

These are from "Rundschau" a German tailoring periodical and date to 1936.

The first two digits of the numbers below the illustrations indicate the year of publication.
 

Flanderian

Practically Family
Messages
833
Location
Flanders, NJ, USA
These are from "Rundschau" a German tailoring periodical and date to 1936.

The first two digits of the numbers below the illustrations indicate the year of publication.

Ah! Thank you for the explanation, I had just assumed they were numbers of that specific model of clothing.

So then a Rundschau might be roughly equivalent to publications termed in English a magazine? A trade periodical?
 

Flanderian

Practically Family
Messages
833
Location
Flanders, NJ, USA
To my eye this next series has the look another wholesale catalog that shows retailers the available options for their retail customers. Thinking back 50 or so years ago, I think I recall seeing lists with similar options, though I don't recall illustrations, in a retailer's pamphlet for MTM with a particular U.S. maker. (Samuelsohn? Southwick?)

Judging from the style, I'd place these as from the late 40's to early '50's as likely from an English or U.S. maker. But if continental, later. Member Fastuni's helpful explanation makes me wonder if these too might be from a similar source as a German Rundschau, but translated into English?

Part 1 of 2:


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Fastuni

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2,278
Location
Germany
Ah! Thank you for the explanation, I had just assumed they were numbers of that specific model of clothing.

So then a Rundschau might be roughly equivalent to publications termed in English a magazine? A trade periodical?

"Rundschau" was a common name for magazines, literally "look around".
The full name of this periodical was "Rundschau der Herrenmode" (for men's fashion) and there also was a "Rundschau der Damenmode" (for ladies fashion). Published by Müller & Söhne in Munich. It still exists today I think.
This was a trade periodical specifically for the tailoring craft. They offered beside cutting patterns, advice on the latest fashions, also on legal issues and developments and news regarding the craft.

The publisher Müller had an own cutting system and was offering courses and schoolings which were very much used by German tailors. It also was influential abroad. "Rundschau" had subscribers around the world, especially Eastern Europe, Asia and South America.

Beside "Rundschau der Herrenmode" the other big German tailoring periodical was "Der Schneidermeister" (the tailoring master) published in Hannover.
 

Flanderian

Practically Family
Messages
833
Location
Flanders, NJ, USA
"Rundschau" was a common name for magazines, literally "look around".
The full name of this periodical was "Rundschau der Herrenmode" (for men's fashion) and there also was a "Rundschau der Damenmode" (for ladies fashion). Published by Müller & Söhne in Munich. It still exists today I think.
This was a trade periodical specifically for the tailoring craft. They offered beside cutting patterns, advice on the latest fashions, also on legal issues and developments and news regarding the craft.

The publisher Müller had an own cutting system and was offering courses and schoolings which were very much used by German tailors. It also was influential abroad. "Rundschau" had subscribers around the world, especially Eastern Europe, Asia and South America.

Beside "Rundschau der Herrenmode" the other big German tailoring periodical was "Der Schneidermeister" (the tailoring master) published in Hannover.

Thank you once again for that thorough and very interesting elaboration. I find learning such things fascinating!
 

Flanderian

Practically Family
Messages
833
Location
Flanders, NJ, USA
Part 2 of 2:


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These last two illustrations are obviously from a different source, The National Association of Merchant Tailors of America. It's a name redolent of questions; did America once boast a sufficient number of true tailors as to support an individual trade association? It seems to suggest so. But they're rather nice, irrespective of provenance, and as I only have the two, I shall tuck them in here.


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Flanderian

Practically Family
Messages
833
Location
Flanders, NJ, USA
This next series is a very well done set of black and white drawings. Don't know enough about the process to state they're either ink, pencil or charcoal, but I feel the illustrator does a particularly nice job of shading the drawings. The style illustrated is from the meat of the era, and presented very attractively.

Part 1 of 2:


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Flanderian

Practically Family
Messages
833
Location
Flanders, NJ, USA
This next series is from a magazine that was published for six years from 1951 to 1957. As such, it falls beyond the era that is most commonly thought of as the Golden Era, though as I've stated, that's subjective. It's of interest in that it directly addresses sartorial interests of men, as did Esquire of the same period. This magazine was named Gentry and was published by William C. Segal, an art director by profession, as well as publisher. It had a different outlook from Esquire in that while Esquire might have been described as aspirational but intended for the Every-Man, Gentry was actually about, intended for, and featured gentlemen from high society.

When I first became familiar with Gentry, I was under the impression that it dealt exclusively, or at least primarily, with sartorial subjects similarly to Apparel Arts. Then several years ago I purchased a sampling of its content in the form of a book published by Harper titled The Gentry Man. I learned then that it was a more general interest men's periodical dealing with some of the same topics as Esquire, subjects such as food, automobiles and art. But it approached these from what I believe it considered an elevated level of taste.

And unlike Esquire, it appears to have used only photos in its sartorial articles. And its subjects were from the higher social strata of the era, it was not only titled Gentry but also actually depicted those who might be so termed in these photos. As to their success, and comparison to Esquire's illustrations I shall let the reader make their own determination. And while it might only be indicative my personal naivety, I find them a bit amateurish. And somewhat comically, not all pictured subjects appear delighted to be included among those photographed.

Yet, it does offer a different and extensive look at one segment of mainly American men's sartorial preferences of a particular era, and collectively offers some material, and fashions, I've not seen elsewhere. I believe I've got 60 something photos from this publication, and will post them sequentially in coming days.


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