History Preservation Associates - Official Affiliate Thread

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by HPA Rep, Jan 13, 2014.

  1. HPA Rep

    HPA Rep Sponsoring Affiliate

    Messages:
    1,183
    Location:
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    Jacket-of-the-Day

    The Eastman A-2 Jacket Standard Edition, Dark Brown Horse Hide remains a high-quality, highly authentic A-2, albeit eclipsed in sales performance by Eastman's Original-Maker A-2's; nonetheless, this is no A-2 to apologize for.

    The "house-style" or Standard A-2's by Eastman are authentic in fabrication and construction, but where latitude exits between original contractors from WWII, Eastman has designed this A-2 as if they had been a contractor at the time, crafting the shape, size, and stitching style of pockets, collar and epaulets, etc., as well as lining and wool colors, within the confines of what was authentic for any number of original contractors without copying a single contractor identically, and the result is the gem you see here.

    The color is semi-matte dark brown applied with full aniline dye and the leather is Eastman's premium vegetable-tanned Italian horse hide weighing in at approximately 3 ounces in weight. The all-cotton broadcloth lining is the same made-to-spec. lining employed in all Eastman A-2's, but here dyed in the typical rust brown found on many original A-2 jackets, and the wool knit is also the same made-to-spec. stock found in all Eastman A-2's, but dyed in a chestnut brown for this style.

    This is the most generous in fit of all Eastman A-2's, which is not to suggest it is oversized or big, but it poses almost no fit issues for anyone and is extremely comfortable out of the box. We have been restocked with all sizes from 38-48 regular and welcome the opportunity to outfit you in a top-tier WWII A-2 flying jacket.

    https://www.historypreservation.com...usaaf-a-2-flying-jacket-seal-brown-horsehide/

    ELC A-2 SHH 42 front sm.jpg
    ELC A-2 SHH chest 2 sm.jpg
    ELC A-2 SHH shoulder close 2 sm.jpg
    ELC A-2 SHH sholder close sm.jpg
    ELC A-2 SHH size 42 chest sm.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2019
  2. CBI

    CBI One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,164
    Location:
    USA
    Has Eastman up'd their game or what? Super "house" A-2. Terrific!
     
    HPA Rep likes this.
  3. DavidTen

    DavidTen New in Town

    Messages:
    10
    Hello all. First post after having lurked for a few months. The education I have received thus far has been overwhelming (in a good way). I have been through HPA’s website multiple times and cannot for the life of me find any area that lists inventory of stock jackets. It’s great that new stock is coming in but where can I find it? I’m 6’6” and a sold 48” so I am probably not in the target demographic size-wise, but would like to see what could be possible without a wait.

    Dave
     
  4. HPA Rep

    HPA Rep Sponsoring Affiliate

    Messages:
    1,183
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Welcome, Dave!

    Thank you for the inquiry on our thread - I'm honored that your first post is right here!!! The production of Eastman products is different than any other brand we stock, in that we get shipments throughout the year of all items, thus almost everything is available, albeit sometimes with a wait between deliveries, whereas our other brands supply 1-2 times a year, item depending, so when we get a particular item that is all there will be for a long while or at all; these products are setup to display inventory when something sells out.

    We'd need an accurate measure of your chest circumference and waist at the widest part, plus shirt-sleeve measure, body weight, the sort of clothing you wish to wear under the jacket, the sort of fit you seek, and the jacket style you desire in order to advise on size, but it is looking as if no regular size will work for you and that some styles will also not work. If your chest is indeed 48", then a 48 is the only size to consider, but as I noted, some styles either don't come in this size or are too trim in fit to work in this size. As for height, it's possible a regular could work in an Eastman Standard A-2, but an extra-long size is absolutely on the table and this would be special order and would not be available anytime soon.

    Please contact me at work if you wish to supply the additional body details we need and I'll see what that yields for you, unless you do not mind providing such info. here. Please advise if you need anything else at all. Thank you.
     
    DavidTen likes this.
  5. HPA Rep

    HPA Rep Sponsoring Affiliate

    Messages:
    1,183
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Jacket-of-the-Day

    The Eastman USN G-1 Leather Flying Jacket, Spec. 55-J-14 is a real ace of a G-1 copy, and the most popular of their USN jacket styles. As the first of the G-1 jacket series in 1947, the 55-J-14 is renowned by those in the know as the G-1 style to get! Everything about this jacket just begs for daily use: it's so easy to slip in and off, thanks to the rayon lining in that purple-brown shade so typical of most 55-J-14's, the cut and fit are so very slick, the bi-swing action back and hinged armpits for full freedom of movement, rugged, vegetable-tanned goatskin that explodes with the most amazing, plump, pebbled grain that is robust, yet so comfortable and flexible out of the box, and the sumptuous mouton collar in contrasting dark red brown.

    Other noteworthy features that compound the authenticity and lure of this Eastman style are the all-cotton 4/16-gauge contrasting assembly thread that looks so slick next to the dark brown goatskin, dull-nickel vintage-style Talon zipper, made-to-spec. heavyweight all-cotton duck in the natural grey state as pocket lining, bi-direction, single-ply waistband, woven contractor label in the neck area that contains the size (one label must be made for every size - very costly, but very authentic) and painted U. S. N. stencil on collar back in off-white; you'll want to proudly wear the collar up to broadcast that this jacket is the real business!

    This G-1 flight jacket is a true classic, born from a time when propeller-driven Corsairs and turbine-powered Banshees roared off the same flight decks! Grab your slice of old-school Navy with the 55-J-14 - we have all sizes from 38 - 48 now in stock.

    https://www.historypreservation.com...sn-g-1-intermediate-flying-jacket-spec-55j14/

    ELC G-1 42R sm.jpg
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    G-1 collar back sm.jpg
    G-1 pockets close sm.jpg
    G-1 pocket duck sm.jpg
     
  6. Big J

    Big J Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,989
    Location:
    Japan
    @HPA Rep, well, as far as Japan goes, its pursuit of market share as a function of viewing everything as a zero-sum game is directly responsible for the continuation of economic nationalism, which plays out as effectively closed markets due to hyper-protectionism and multitudes of non tariff barriers (ironically, this contributes more to Japan's economic stagnation than to any imagined economic benefits being brought).
    In addition there is the Japanese (misinformed) belief that Japanese manufacture all products better than everyone else, and a latent fear of non-Japanese companies and products (which are always portrayed as unreliable, dangerous, offering no consumer protection etc).
    In addition there is the fact that Japanese are way behind the curve in terms of exploiting the internet for business; web pages are badly designed, windows XP is still the norm, electronic billing and payments are still virtually unknown, and the internet itself is 'foreign' and therefore seen as untrustworthy. Add to this a closed protectionist banking system, and its almost impossible to use the internet for international shopping for the average Japanese.
    And then there's the Japanese desire to actually want to visit a store and see what they are buying; shopping IRL is still the major leisure activity of employment age Japanese.
    The Japanese still buy new fax machines to use at home for sending documents; commercial use of the internet at an individual level is like 20 years ago back home, and it's not going to change anytime soon.
    Ever wondered why these Japanese companies don't make and sell their products in a size 48, or a 50? It's because Japanese society (and therefore businesses) really don't want to interact with the outside world- it's 'mendokusai' because it's made up of internationally accepted business, banking and legal norms that the Japanese regularly refuse to accept, because...
    They see everything as a zero-sum game, winners and losers, and rather than take part and risk a (perceived) loss, they'd rather continue shuffling along with a stagnating economy patting themselves on the back for not 'losing'.
    I was in Singapore yesterday: it's a booming and vibrant little country packed with financial sector business that Japan shunned, preferring to protect its markets.

    The revised pattern G-1 and an early RAF jacket are ELC designs that I'd like to try on in real life. If they fit and are as good as they look in the photos, I could see me paying the ticket price. But for off the peg jackets with no alterations, for what is essentially a reproduction of workwear thrown together as quickly as possible with lowest possible QC stipulations back in the day, it's getting a bit absurd. Real wartime jackets just weren't as high quality.
     
  7. Doctor Damage

    Doctor Damage My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,242
    Location:
    Ontario
    No to derail this thread, but isn't Singapore a heavily "top-down" country? Sort of proof that economic success doesn't require freedom or democracy as we know it in the so-called West.
     
  8. HPA Rep

    HPA Rep Sponsoring Affiliate

    Messages:
    1,183
    Location:
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    Thanks for your insights on this, Big J. Very fascinating stuff, at least to me, and I have seen much of what you described in the 30 years I've been dealing with the Japanese in this area of business. I certainly agree that they are very averse to risk vs. the potential gain in such things as making products that may not, on the face of it, work for their home market but may well work for the western market.

    I agree that wartime-contracted jackets were not as high quality as what is being offered here, but this is such a simplistic statement that I'm quite surprised that someone who has demonstrated that they are pretty well informed as to what makes these high-quality copies tick ever would say this.

    Firstly, the original jackets were using materials made to a standard that was very much commonplace to the era; no one needed to get each component specially made to match something that existed 80 years before and using outdated techniques, machinery, parts, etc., which is where we are at today with high-end copies. Applying the same factors to making jackets today as per the wartime contracts would, for example, entail the ease and simplicity of using polyester thread, YKK zippers, plastic buttons, broad-loom labels, poly-blended linings, chrome-tanned, heavily processed, bottom-split hides, and the list of contemporary cheesiness goes on ...

    Secondly and no less important, the contracted wartime jackets were not being purchased by consumers, which is not the case with repro jackets today. The low-quality workmanship so commonplace in the vintage jackets would not bode well for sales today; in fact, even really low-end flying jackets sold today are cut and sewn to a far higher standard of workmanship than applies to the vintage counterparts. Consumers of these high-end repro jackets seem to really like authenticity, but not when it comes to crummy assembly with pockets misaligned, snaps not centered on pockets, collars twisted, empty stitch holes, crooked labels, and stitching that wiggles in and out like a drunken snake. And contracted jackets were made by contractors who were the lowest bidder poised to make thousands of the exact same thing that were all guaranteed to be paid for, not making a few dozen or even a hundred of a specific style that they then had to sit on until buyers were found, and original contractors weren't painstakingly copying the manufacturing style of some other company.

    I do agree that some of the high-end jackets are indeed getting very pricey, but I'd also say that, as I've been noting here in my posts, they should have been higher priced all along to properly reflect the profit margins needed. The leather jackets that I maintain should really be $2, 000.00 or more today were too cheap at $550.00 in 1997 and $700.00 in 2007.

    We're all free to dislike and like what we want and to vote our feelings with our wallets. If higher prices mean no one buys any more and stagnant prices mean the businesses cannot sustain their operations, then that ends things and we can watch as secondary sales skyrocket in price because the items are no longer produced.

    But you didn't address some of my questions, Big J, which I'll again repeat:

    You made a suggestion, previously, as to price gouging. Please do tell what would be price gouging to you? Please define this. Is 1, 000% markup, as used as an industry standard by, say, RRL, LL Bean, J. Crew, etc., price gouging? Is the 400% markup enjoyed by, say, Alpha Industries and most all other like entities operating in the USA engaged in both wholesaling and retailing gouging? Was it price gouging when John at Goodwear announced several years ago that he was increasing prices as a disincentive to buying in an effort to reduce the waiting time? What markup would you allow businesses before you suggest they may be "gouging?"

    I just don't see anyone price gouging. Price gouging, as I define it, is opportunistic, so if the regular price for a bottle of water at, say, Big J's Oasis on the tiny island resort of Banana Leaf is 99 cents, and then there is a record-breaking heat wave and the only other seller of bottled water on the island never got their delivery and is out of bottled water, but the shrewd Big J has a warehouse full stashed away, so Big J breaks it out and puts a price on each bottle of $5.00 each, only to return to regular pricing once the heat wave abates and bottled water is again available elsewhere, that would be classic price gouging.

    But no one is selling anything here that must be purchased or that cannot be purchased in similar form elsewhere. Would you agree that suggesting price gouging was a bit over the top, Big J?

    I sincerely thank you for the insights, Big J.
     
    Doctor Damage and ShanghaiJack like this.
  9. Big J

    Big J Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,989
    Location:
    Japan
    @Doctor Damage, yeah, exactly! ROK (South Korea) is another example of a planned economy; in the 60's and 70's the government was implementing 5 year plans, the sort of things you'd expect with communist regimes. Very interesting.

    @HPA Rep, I do appreciate that the materials used back then are now harder to source and reproduce and that that is a level of accuracy that costs.
    I'm glad that you agree with me that many modern high end repros are too good compared to genuine wartime articles. I personally think that insisting that these 'better than originals' jackets are 'the best repros' is kind of dishonest and dangerously misleading; in the future there will be a time when no originals survive, and everyone will think WWII jackets were made of awesome leather with perfect stitching and obsessive attention to detail.
    In this regard, repro manufacturers have mislead potential customers over wartime QC standards for decades, and now customers are demanding inauthentic levels of QC in their repros. There's no way back from that for these companies. They've encouraged customers to have unrealistic expectations.
    Case in point; I recently bought an ELC G-1 of the unrevised pattern. For years ELC maintained this was a perfect repro. About a year ago they revised their pattern and now the new G-1 is perfect. It's not just ELC, many other companies do this too.

    As far as price gouging (which I mentioned as a query and not as an assertion), then yes, all the cases you mentioned are price gouging. And don't even get me started on GoodWear, everyone here knows pretty well how I feel about that, lolz.
    I was suggesting that ELC may be mistakenly pricing its products in line with Japanese price points for similar products, and pointing out why this would (should it be the case) represent a profound (but understandable) ignorance of Japanese domestic economic dynamics.

    I think what really gets me about too many high end jackets is the authenticity issue; it's like going to a classic car meet, and seeing the show car that's had it's engine bay and underside detailed and polished, and then being told 'this is exactly how they all came straight off the production line back in the day'.
     
    Flightengineer and Cooper A-2 like this.
  10. HPA Rep

    HPA Rep Sponsoring Affiliate

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    Location:
    New Jersey
    Jacket-of-the-Day

    The Eastman Luftwaffe Erich Hartmann Jacket in Black is a blend of unique styling and high authenticity. Meticulously copied from original French-made leather jackets of the 1940's so commonly adopted by German Luftwaffe Jagdfliegern and photos of Major Hartmann wearing his leather jacket, the result is a stunning look that fits sleekly, just as the Luftwaffe leather jackets did.

    Zippers are specially made by RiRi in dull gunmetal to resemble the style of zips so frequently seen on the vintage jackets, including having contrasting tan-cotton zipper tape. Assembled with all-cotton thread throughout, lined with a wool plaid that is perfectly in keeping with the lining types found on the Luftwaffe leather jackets, outfitted with adjustable side belts to snugly cinch at the hips, and crafted from costly vegetable-tanned capeskin that is so butter soft it's as if one is wearing just a cardigan, yet it's so extremely durable.

    We illustrate here the typical variation found in consignments of these jackets vis-vis the leather characteristics, where we can offer some jackets in smoother capeskin and others with a heavy grain. We can accommodate your requests for leather type as long as our stock allows, so act while the supply is good. We have been re-stocked with all sizes from 38 - 48 in black, though brown is also available.

    https://www.historypreservation.com...r-erich-hartmann-commemorative-flying-jacket/
    hartmann blk 42r sm.jpg
    hartmann blk grain sm.jpg
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    Last edited: May 15, 2019
  11. Big J

    Big J Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,989
    Location:
    Japan
    That Hartmann jacket looks awesome.
    I've said it before, but I'll say it again; it'd look great with some smart pants, a shirt and a necktie. I could wear that to an office if I had to.
    So that's three ELC jackets I could see me paying full ticket price for, even though prices are climbing like homesick angels.
     
  12. willyto

    willyto Practically Family

    Messages:
    982
    Location:
    Barcelona
    The leather on that size 40 is out of this world!
     
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  13. hondurasdave47

    hondurasdave47 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    Cleveland, Ohio
    I love the collar on the Hartmann!
     
    HPA Rep likes this.
  14. HPA Rep

    HPA Rep Sponsoring Affiliate

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    Location:
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    Jacket-of-the-Day

    The Eastman Rough Wear Clothing Co. B-15 in End-Zone Twill is a really fabulous jacket that is supremely comfortable, surprisingly versatile, light in weight, and provides for a temperature range between 35-55 degrees F. when worn on its own.

    Authenticity and functionality reign supreme on this masterpiece, with noteworthy features that include the luxurious mouton collar, two two-way pockets, pencil pocket on the sleeve, alpaca-and-wool lining, offset zipper in black oxide finish on contrasting tan, all-cotton zipper tape, original contractor label for the Rough Wear Clothing Co. (and a separate label for each size - very costly), AAF decals in the lining and shoulder sleeve, and the amazing End-Zone Twill fabric.

    When the B-15 was introduced, End-Zone Twill was used as trim on major stress and heavy-wear areas of the lining, though the Rough Wear Clothing Co., along with a few other manufacturers, received contracts for some of their entire production of B-15 Flight Jackets to be made completely of End-Zone Twill.

    End-Zone Twill is manufactured with 100% cotton in the warp (the fibers than run in a longitudinal direction) and 100% rayon in the weft (the fibers that run in a latitudinal direction), giving the fabric a unique appearance of being shiny on one side and dull on the other. The density of the weave makes this fabric particularly strong; with 140 yarns per inch, this is an extremely dense cloth that feels both polished and hard on the surface, while wearing magnificently. This was the hardest-wearing fabric used in WWII by the U. S. Army for jackets.

    The B-15 is a slick jacket of esteemed historical significance that just begs to be worn. We have been re-stocked with all sizes 38-48:

    https://www.historypreservation.com...af-b-15-flying-jacket-rough-wear-clothing-co/

    b-15 front sm.jpg
    B-15 inside sm.jpg
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    B-15 AAF decal.jpg
     
  15. Big J

    Big J Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,989
    Location:
    Japan
    That Endzone Twill B-15 is another ELC jacket if pay for, I'm loving that.
    And there's a ladies version I'd buy for Mrs. J.
     
    Stand By, HPA Rep and nick123 like this.
  16. nick123

    nick123 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,801
    Location:
    California
    These recently posted leathers look SUPERB. The A-1 is a gem.
     
    HPA Rep likes this.
  17. HPA Rep

    HPA Rep Sponsoring Affiliate

    Messages:
    1,183
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Jacket-of-the-Day

    The Eastman Rough Wear Clothing Co. B-6 Flying Jacket is, arguably, the most attractive and unique-looking B-6 they offer - those pre-1942 "redskin" flying jackets are just like no other! And the mottled, hand-dyed, vegetable-tanned "red skin" sheepskin, which is trimmed down 1/4" depth to conform with original AAF spec., makes this the lightest-weight sheepskin offering from Eastman.

    The hand-dyed process means no two jackets are ever the same, exactly as the original jackets were dyed. The sheepskin exterior is given a special process in the tanning to bring out all of the natural grain, creating the broken-grain look found on so many vintage sheepskin flying jackets. Even the wool color is different on these early jackets, being more of a deep, golden-tan color vs. more of a buttermilk shade as found on many later jackets.

    Effective operating temperature for the B-6 can span 55-30 degrees F., depending on what is being worn under the jacket; substantial layering will enable the B-6 to function well in lower temperatures. The absence of sleeve reinforcements, as found on a B-3 Flying Jacket, provides for fantastic flexibility and comfort in conjunction with the 1/4" sheep wool and the double-pleated bi-swing action back. And although the sheep wool is correctly only 1/4" in depth, it is nonetheless very lush and plush - just look at the collar on this jacket!

    Authentic enhancements are many, and the custom-made, nickel-plated chain neck hanger and spring-loaded Crown zipper top the list. The zips are made to absolute perfection, right down to the famous chevron teeth and copper safety wire running through both sides of the all-cotton zipper tape, exactly as found on the original zips. And this is the early version of the Crown zip, correctly copied with no lip on the slider.

    As with all Eastman leather jackets, a proportionate-size sewing needle is employed vis-a-vis the thread size, so that no unsightly, gaping holes are punched into the leather, as so often encountered in other leather jackets available today.

    We've again been re-stocked with all sizes 40-48 regular. Now is the time to buy while stocks allow for some selection of color shades and leather, not when everyone else is buying when winter's chill is upon us.

    https://www.historypreservation.com...jacket-rough-wear-clothing-co-contract-17756/
    RW B-6 fr sm.jpg
    RW B-6 chest sm.jpg
    RW B-6 collar sm.jpg
    RWB-6 Crown Zip sm.jpg
     
  18. HPA Rep

    HPA Rep Sponsoring Affiliate

    Messages:
    1,183
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Those B-17 Flight Nurse Jackets are really nice, Big J, though they are not made from the End-Zone Twill. If you ever want one, I can help with the size. They run very trim, so most women go up a size, and length also needs to be considered. They are also cut for wear with high-rise pants, so low-rise jeans and pants do not work with the style.
     
    nick123 likes this.
  19. HPA Rep

    HPA Rep Sponsoring Affiliate

    Messages:
    1,183
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Jacket-of-the-Day

    Eastman A-2 Flying Jacket Monarch Mfg. Co. 23378 has become a personal favorite of mine. We often are asked to compare the fit of Monarch to Rough Wear Clothing Co. A-2 Jackets and the simplest way to describe the two is to say that Monarch is designed like a vertical-running rectangle and Rough Wear is more like a square. Both styles can be worn by most body types very well and I adore both, but Monarch has become more of a go-to style in recent years.

    The gorgeous, light-shade russet brown horse hide is fully vegetable tanned and fully aniline dyed, brining out all the rugged, character-rich, natural grain that only gets better from wear. Please note the diffuse grain on the various jacket parts and how vintage this looks even on a new, unworn jacket.

    Besides a unique fit, Monarch is also known for the elongated collar, inside sleeve seams that are outward rotated, whereby the seams more closely align with the thumb than the typical alignment to the middle finger, and the seam that joins the back panel to the front chest panels is hidden under the epaulets, also unlike almost all other original A-2 contractors, and narrow epaulets, naming but a few unique features. Unlike some current manufacturers, the assembly corresponds correctly to AAF spec. and is completed with 4-ply, 16-gauge, all-cotton thread sewn with a needle of proportionate size so that no insultingly large, gaping holes are punched into the leather, ruining an otherwise-nice jacket.

    Unlike Eastman Original-Maker A-2’s copying Rough Wear and Star Sportswear, Monarch does not compel one to go up a size for a comfortable fit, even though it is a trim-fitting design. This is not to say that some won’t need to go up a size, but even I must go up a size in, say, Star Sportswear, but here you can see me modeling a size 40R Monarch. My body details are as follows: chest 40", waist 30", height 5' 9" tall, weight 147-150 lbs., shirt-sleeve measure 33", and my build is very lean and athletic.

    We have been re-stocked with all sizes 38R – 48R.

    https://www.historypreservation.com...ying-jacket-monarch-mfg-co-contract-no-23378/

    A-2 Monarch fr.jpg
    A-2 Monarch collar sm1.jpg
    A-2 Monarch collar 2 sm.jpg
    A-2 Monarch sleeve sm.jpg
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    _DSC0002crpadjwo.jpg
     

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