How do you stay inspired during uninspiring times?

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by PrettySquareGal, Jun 19, 2012.

  1. AmateisGal

    AmateisGal I'll Lock Up

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    Nebraska
    I am very fortunate to work in an office building that was built in 1927. The lobby is gorgeous, and although the offices themselves are all updated (cubicles - UGH), it's still fun to work in.
     
  2. Feraud

    Feraud Bartender

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    I am always thrilled to make periodic visits to the Art Deco Fred French Building in NYC. The place has a stunning interior.
     
  3. Angus Forbes

    Angus Forbes One of the Regulars

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    261
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    Raleigh, NC, USA
    I thought that Nebraska wasn't built until 1927 (just kidding, just kidding!)
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2012
  4. AmateisGal

    AmateisGal I'll Lock Up

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    Hey! lol

    Seriously, I think there are people who still think we travel in covered wagons out here and live in sod houses...
     
  5. Undertow

    Undertow My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Des Moines, IA, US
    lol
     
  6. Undertow

    Undertow My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Des Moines, IA, US
    Nope, they must be looking over the IA border - that's us. ;)

    You're lucky to work in a 1927 building. We tear ours down in Des Moines just willy nilly.
     
  7. AmateisGal

    AmateisGal I'll Lock Up

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    We are fortunate to have a lot of old buildings still standing and still being used in our downtown area. I hope it continues to stay this way.

    And you just have cornfields in Iowa and nothing else, right? ;)
     
  8. Flicka

    Flicka One Too Many

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    Sweden
    I have a set of blogs I read that do wonders for my inspiration. They remind me that there are people out there who are both kind, creative and have a sense of humour. They almost make up for all the bitterness, hostility and rudeness I have to deal with on a daily basis.

    I'm feeling a little fragile at the moment. Does anyone have tips for kind, warm, fuzzy things?

    ETA: I made cookies and curled up outside with coffee and candles in that weird twilight that passes as night here these days and listened to Mark Lanegan & Isobel Campbell. It worked wonders.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2012
  9. Undertow

    Undertow My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Des Moines, IA, US
    This is true. I actually work in a barn next to a silo. lol More like a glass horseshoe, actually.

    The bummer about Des Moines architecture is that we had TONS of really neat, really historical stuff, but Des Moines was specifically a coal producer and railroad hub, with very little else. When we ran out of coal in the 1910's, we had the railroads to fall back on. Rail traffic slowed after the interstate system was finished, so we tried to be the insurance capitol. Once Hartford, CT took that from us, we stagnated quite a bit.

    During the 1980's recession, Des Moines started tearing old buildings down and leaving empty lots with no one to repurpose them. We lost all kinds of really interesting history that way. :(
     
  10. You don't??? :p:D
     
  11. AmateisGal

    AmateisGal I'll Lock Up

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    Not since I was a kid. I used to pick up buffalo chips for our wood-burning stove, but we recently upgraded. :p :p :p
     
  12. AmateisGal

    AmateisGal I'll Lock Up

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    I find that baking while listening to some good music is wonderful. Alternatively, just sitting down with a good book with classical music playing the background, my kitties snuggled beside me, and a warm chocolate chip cookie straight from the oven and a cold glass of milk sets the world aright again. Simple pleasures. :)
     
  13. bunnyb.gal

    bunnyb.gal Practically Family

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    sunny London

    That's why I make a daily visit to the Lounge, Flicka, even if these days I've been doing more "lurking" than "chiming in". More often than not when I walk out the front door I feel more like an observer from another planet than an active part of the society of the beings around me (but given the way I see so many people behave, misbehave rather, I'd prefer to not "go with the flow"), and can't wait to get back to my Art Deco cocoon and back to my...


    ...greyhounds and lurcher, who remind me that life isn't so bad when you've got someone to snuggle up to and play squeaky games with! They keep me sane. Mostly.
     
  14. AmateisGal

    AmateisGal I'll Lock Up

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    Nebraska
    Found this floating around on Facebook and thought I'd share.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. AtomicEraTom

    AtomicEraTom

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    Portage, Wis.
    I shared this on Facebook the other day. Ain't it the truth?

     
  16. dnjan

    dnjan One Too Many

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    Seattle
    A sod house would probably have been cooler this past week ...
     
  17. AmateisGal

    AmateisGal I'll Lock Up

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    Location:
    Nebraska
    You're probably right!
     
  18. Grizzly Adams

    Grizzly Adams A-List Customer

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    Location:
    New Mexico
    I read this board often, but rarely comment. However, I found this thread to be very interesting and enlightening in terms of this community. While it is common for older folks (seasoned citizen) like myself to miss the world of our youth, and to feel the lose of those "vintage values" (interesting term), I guess I am surprised that younger people, many who have no first hand memory of those times, or values, could also feel the lose! The fact that you are "there" in terms of a mind set and appreciation of those values is encouraging. I hope some of you are instilling these values in your children.

    That said, let me add that, while there was much to admire and love about the era, there was also a very dark side. I am reminded of a conversation I had a a boy with my Grandfather. I had remarked that things were not like "the good old days," to which he responded, "No boy, they certainly are not. Things are a whole lot better!" ;)

    Sad, but true. The old saying, that "The hand that rocks the cradle rules the world," is still as true today as ever. To look down on the "home maker and mother" is as sad as putting down the young women who wants to dedicate her life and energy to a vocation or career. There is need for both, and both have great worth.

    :eusa_clapYou're one of the good guys that we need more of. Good to see such splendid behavior in one so young. That's compliment from one who sees so many young folks who show little evidence of any positive values!

    +1 Wasn't it B Franklin who said, "Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy."? My apologies to Ben if I misquoted him..... In any case, we should all keep in mind, that whatever the perils and stress of modern times, we are all where God wants us to be - it is up to us to recognize that, and make the best of it, for ourselves, and for others.

    My regards to all.:)
     
  19. I read and re-read the Jeeves stories by P.G. Wodehouse. Not only is it period-perfect, it's funny and light as a feather. When you read those stories, you can't help but be happy. Be warned, though: the stories can be so similar that you may find yourself halfway through one book until you realize you've already read it. But I just keep reading it (re-reading it) anyway.

    I recently bought The Complete Sherlock Holmes and I am looking forward to finishing it.

    On "the news": yes, the news is depressing, but the news was always depressing, and some of the more lurid contemporary news items were simply not reported in the old days. Also, governments in the 20th Century killed 100 million people. I wonder how the Loungers would have reacted to the news of those mass killings. WWII was no picnic. As one old-timer said, "Times are hard now. They were always hard."
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 8, 2012
  20. And what's not helpful is the level of today's constant media saturation, the likes of which didn't quite exist in the old days, which makes almost any news unbearable. While there's an old media saying that if it bleeds it leads, nowadays, not only must it bleed but it must be coughing up chunks of its own innards before it would warrant even the slightest media attention.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2012

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