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I can't believe people are into coveralls

That is a bit odd, but it takes all kinds I suppose.

I like the older stuff myself.

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vitanola

I'll Lock Up
Messages
4,249
Location
Gopher Prairie, MI
When I was younger, in my late twenties, I would spend my evenings restoring one or another ancient car. Late one evening I developed a powerful thirst. Since it was about time to check my work I hung the license tag on the flivver chassis on which I was working, put the box seat over the fuel tank, cranked the buggy and hied me off to my favorite watering hole. I was wearing a set of those 1930's railroad issue twill coveralls, which did help keep me a bit warmer driving forty an hour in an essentially bodiless car on a chilly evening. All I wanted was a drink. I was greasy, nearly black, and not the most attractive package in the room, or so I thought. Great Guns! It seemed as if I had swallowed a gallon bottle of "IT"! I had wanted to go off in a quiet corner and have a quick drink and run back to the shop, but alas, it was not to be...
 
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Stearmen

I'll Lock Up
Messages
7,202
This pair of overalls, makes me want a 1930s race car. Maybe, I could settle for a Model A Speedster!
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Edward

Bartender
Messages
23,007
Location
London, UK
Hardly surprising if overalls / boilersuits were to make it to fashion-status, given the vogue for all else workwear in recent decades. I've considered a Sidcot suit for wearing round the house in Winter, myself.
 

Inkstainedwretch

One Too Many
Messages
1,023
Location
United States
Consider that what now constitutes men's clothing: button-up shirt, ankle-length trousers, jacket and lace-up shoes was at one time considered workingman's clothing. Gentlemen wore wigs, cutaway coats, weskits, knee breeches, silk stockings and pumps. The Sans-culottes of French Revolutionary times aggressively dressed in proletarian clothes to distinguish themselves from the aristocrats (even when they were themselves of the upper, educated classes). Now we wear late 19th - early 20th century work clothes. Levis were designed for miners. People who wouldn't know how to mount a horse dress as cowboys. And what can I say about the chambray shirt? A hundred years from now the leisure classes will dress like campesinos, gangstas and derelicts.
 

2jakes

I'll Lock Up
Messages
9,680
Location
Alamo Heights ☀️ Texas
Looking over that link submitted by the original poster confirms a truth once spoken by a wise observer of the human scene: "You can point to any item in the Sears catalog, and somebody, somewhere wants to sleep with it."


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Speaking of links.
On the side of the marquee of the above photo, led me to images of the vast
activities & events from the past at the Strand.
One image stands out.
Wearing an elegant black dress & holding a box of popcorn at the Oscars.
Beautiful smile, you look gorgeous!
 

Stearmen

I'll Lock Up
Messages
7,202
Looking over that link submitted by the original poster confirms a truth once spoken by a wise observer of the human scene: "You can point to any item in the Sears catalog, and somebody, somewhere wants to sleep with it."
Barney Miller!
 

Stearmen

I'll Lock Up
Messages
7,202
Consider that what now constitutes men's clothing: button-up shirt, ankle-length trousers, jacket and lace-up shoes was at one time considered workingman's clothing. Gentlemen wore wigs, cutaway coats, weskits, knee breeches, silk stockings and pumps. The Sans-culottes of French Revolutionary times aggressively dressed in proletarian clothes to distinguish themselves from the aristocrats (even when they were themselves of the upper, educated classes). Now we wear late 19th - early 20th century work clothes. Levis were designed for miners. People who wouldn't know how to mount a horse dress as cowboys. And what can I say about the chambray shirt? A hundred years from now the leisure classes will dress like campesinos, gangstas and derelicts.
Don't forget, during most of history, men either wore dresses or skirts!
 
Messages
11,193
Location
Southern California
I have a suit of those striped-denim ones, and wear them for their intended purpose -- doing dirty jobs...
Years ago when all I could afford were cars that weren't 100% reliable, I kept coveralls in the trunk with my tools just in case roadside repairs might become necessary. I only had to use them a few times, but slipping them on over whichever clothes I was wearing was a simple way to keep those clothes from being ruined by dirt, grease, and/or whatever else I might encounter on, under, or near my car while I fumbled about.
 

Fury964

Familiar Face
Messages
60
Location
Uk
As an RAF militaria collector, I can't say that I am strictly into coveralls, but as part of my collection I have around 80 coveralls, ranging from the WWII to the present day (all original), and a pair of repro prestige coveralls similar to the ones that Stearmen posted a picture of. As you would expect, I do have repetitions but there are slight difference which is why I have the duplicates. I have posted a picture of some of them below, 29 to be exact. After that I lost interest in putting the pictures all together as the images now won't all fit on the same page. All the coveralls have at one time or another through the past 70 years, been available to the aircrew of the RAF to combat different problems encountered whilst flying. There are thermal suits, electrically heated suits, air cooled suits. Suits that have built in parachute harnesses and life preservers and suits that will protect you from immersion in the sea should you become departed from your aircraft and end up bobbing around in the drink whilst waiting for rescue.
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