JC Penney Might Be Going Belly Up (Along With Sears)

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by PrettySquareGal, Mar 9, 2017.

  1. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    This particular plaza is over sixty years old, and has very little to recommend it other than the fact that the other "anchor store" is the area's biggest supermarket. I wouldn't be surprised to see the JCP wing of the complex demolished as a way of cutting the losses -- we're overwhelmed with vacant plaza space at other "shopping centers" here in town as it is.

    What they could do is turn it into an indoor impound lot for illegally parked cars, with a credit-card swipe reader on the doors. To reclaim your car you go up there, run your card and pay your fine, and the door unlatches to let you out. But that won't happen, because our local "creative economy" is not very creative at all.
     
  2. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    ⇧ As you've noted before - far from the sharpest (and far from the most honest) municipal gov't you got working in your town. That said, even the bad ones tend to find ways to rake in revenue - taxes, fees, impound lots, etc.

    As an aside, when I was typing "taxes, fees..." it reminded me how obnoxious gov't are in calling things anything but a tax: fee, service charge, surcharge, assessment, excise and toll immediately pop to mind. Just like I bashed (in another thread today) companies who "downsize" their packages to disguise a price increase, I'll bash gov't here who go creative crazy to hide a tax increase and / or the total amount we taxpayers actually pay. The bill at a NYC hotel is testament to this.

    It's all obnoxious, be honest about what you - a gov't or company - are charging us via price increases or taxes. Everything else is deceitful and engenders cynicism and distrust.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2017
  3. ChrisB

    ChrisB A-List Customer

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Shopping online is convenient, and can offer a larger selection of merchandise. The downside is not being able to examine the goods, and paying high shipping costs. When possible, I like to "window shop" online and then purchase at a physical store.
     
    Zombie_61 likes this.
  4. This can be particularly handy when the website allows you to verify whether or not they have the item you want in stock. You might have to drive a little farther to the second or third nearest location, but at least you're not wasting time and gas visiting a closer store that doesn't have what you're looking for. Every once in a while the Internet is actually good for something.
     
  5. sheeplady

    sheeplady I'll Lock Up Bartender

    Except when they add a "ship to store" option and ruin this feature as checking the "in store" box includes (and often only seems to include) "ship to store."

    (Looking at you, Jo-Ann Fabrics.)
     
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  6. William G. and Zombie_61 like this.
  7. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    ⇧ the headline from the story Bob posted:

    Sears has 'substantial doubt' that it can survive
    If true, Sears was the last entity or person on earth to realize this.


    And man is that Sears above an iconic looking "old-style" in-town department store.
     
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  8. PrettySquareGal

    PrettySquareGal I'll Lock Up

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    The clothing for women is terrible but I agree about the men's shirts and tops. My ex and current beau shop there. Well, they do by proxy.
     
    scotrace likes this.
  9. PrettySquareGal

    PrettySquareGal I'll Lock Up

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    AMEN!
     
  10. PrettySquareGal

    PrettySquareGal I'll Lock Up

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    Exactly! Portland, Maine is filthy with creativity.
     
  11. sheeplady

    sheeplady I'll Lock Up Bartender

    Went to the local kmart today to give them some business. The store was filthy... my daughter accidentally dropped a dark blue top and when she picked it up it was brown with dust. There was next to no selection in her size.

    We went to Walmart and they had some of the same things for half the price (and it was clean). I dislike shopping at Walmart for the kids clothes (just about the only thing I but there) but they often beat the prices of the thrift store (that has limited selection and often walmart from last season... with miles on it).
     
  12. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

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    No. THIS is an "iconic looking old style department store":

    af62cbf87b7633b39bfe4264e53ec4f5.jpg

    or perhaps THIS:

    SterlingWelch26.JPG

    The interior light court of the above store at Christmas time:

    Sterling-Lindner-Davis-Christmas-tree-1.png
     
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  13. Bushman

    Bushman My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    I find it ironic that Sears, the company that pioneered mail order service, cannot keep up in the age of mail order service. You could buy anything from Sears, anything from a hammer to a house. It was the Amazon and eBay of its day. You really have to wonder what happened that it lost this lofty position.
     
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  14. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    I remember very well when they did away with their "big book" catalog operation in 1993 -- before the internet as we know it had emerged from the egg. The idea then was that mall stores were here to stay, and that Sears needed to get away from its seedy small-town "catalog outlet store" operations and go all upscale to compete on the mall front with the likes of Macy's. Had their management at the time been just slightly less bone dumb, they could have *been* Amazon -- they had the infrastructure already in place, and nearly a century of experience in shipping goods from regional warehouses to different parts of the country in a very short time. And the world would likely never have heard of the despicable Mr. Bezos.
     
  15. Sharpsburg

    Sharpsburg One of the Regulars

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    Sadly, I know Sears was finished when they sold off Craftsman - a once iconic tool brand.
     
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  16. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Fair point. Growing up in Central NJ, the in-town department stores looked like the mid-century Sears one. But once I started coming into NYC, and saw the original Macys', B. Altman's and Lord and Taylor's stores, I "discovered" the true classic look you highlighted.

    While NYC Altman's has been turned into some sort of library / research thing - it still has the same exterior (I'm guessing it's protected) and the other two stores are still up and running in all their NYC glory. As is the original (or very early iteration) of Saks and Bergdorf Goodman (a really cool looking store).
     
  17. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

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    You see, I grew up in a suburb of Cleveland, and the stores like that Sears store were the common, garden variety places in the suburbs. The city stores were the terra cotta mercantile palaces of the 1910-1920 period. The May Company, Taylors, Sterling-Lindner-Davis, Bonwit Teller, Higbee's, Halle Brothers, Bailey's, Fries & Scheule, and Neisner's. All had lovely old stores in the Downtown shopping districe, and all are gone now.

    My idea of a Sears store also differs from yours, I think. A few blocks from my grandmother's house stood one of the big Art Deco reinforced concrete stores from the Sears company's first build out in 1927-28. The store looked much like this: Sears_1927.jpg
     
  18. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    ⇧ That is a gorgeous building IMHO. There are still some of that style of buildings left in NYC (this city is so big, that some examples of almost all periods and styles still exist).
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2017
    vitanola likes this.
  19. Bushman

    Bushman My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    My Dad was devastated when that happened. He's been an avid buyer of Craftsman his entire life. His toolbox and everything in it was made by Craftsman. My Dad had actually been a prop guy at Sears for their commercials when he worked in the Sears Tower in the 70s and 80s. It was his first job out of high school, and his first job out of the Navy. Heck, all my family worked for Sears at one point. My mom, her sisters, my Dad's brothers... it was simply THE place to work at that time.

    Speaking of the Sears Tower, you'll never catch any self respecting Chicagoan calling it any different. ;)
     
  20. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

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    I still have and use my Craftsman mechanic's tools and all the power tools purchased in the late 1960s.
     
    William G. likes this.

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