Let's talk about wool coats, jackets, and vests

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by TLW '90, Oct 16, 2021.

  1. TLW '90

    TLW '90 One of the Regulars

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    I have looked and could not find anything aside from some general info on the Mackinaw jacket, but I would like to discuss common wool coats vests and jackets of the rugged variety ( ie not formal wear ) in general.
    I have really been Interested in wool for quite a while, and it seems much more affordable so I imagine more wool than leather in my future.

    I can't be the only one who likes wool jackets, pea coats and Mackinaws seem to get their own dedicated discussion but nothing for just wool outerwear in general.

    This is the the first wool piece I bought since deciding to pursue my long standing interest in outerwear.

    I don't know what Woolrich called it, but I'm going with Barn jacket.



    [​IMG]

    It was listed as a Mackinaw when I bought it a year , but that's a stretch if you ask me.
    The length is about right, but that's about it.
    Maybe I'm wrong and this would be considered a Mackinaw ?
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2021
  2. TLW '90

    TLW '90 One of the Regulars

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    Another question.
    Does anyone know particularly when this label dates to ?
    [​IMG]
    The woolrich dating info just lists it under various modern labels.
    The piece is a double breasted Mackinaw I have coming, I'd call it a Cruiser because it has the map pocket but I'm sure that's more of a Filson name.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Cornelius

    Cornelius Practically Family

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  4. Marc mndt

    Marc mndt My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    I love to wear wool coats and jackets, the rugged variety. They actually do a much better job at keeping me warm than leather jackets.

    4244AD3B-48B0-4D41-A11E-5B720647D5A8.jpeg 1F7291E2-8571-466F-B218-17D4933AF368.jpeg 0FC6F335-84D5-4142-A324-99177C17BEE6.jpeg

    I even own a crossover lol: a Harris Tweed Schott Perfecto.

    E042E465-9EF0-4274-BCAC-A1684FAACC46.jpeg
     
  5. Superfluous

    Superfluous My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    My personal favorite:

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. TLW '90

    TLW '90 One of the Regulars

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    That's a very nice looking jacket there.
    Eventually I'll have to try a shorter wool jacket of some kind.
    I generally think of a bit longer of a jacket when I think of wool for some reason.

    I just passed on a nice old woolrich that was being sold as a " wool bomber " for $30.
    It was more like a zip up Letterman but just a plain grey wool, I liked it but couldn't pass up the Mackinaw and now it's gone.
     
  7. MrProper

    MrProper One Too Many

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    This is not 100% wool, but mixed with synthetics. Unfortunately, without lining and thus scratchy and little windproof. The application possibilities are limited.
    EABB3863-D16C-46BC-BB78-2F76874F916F.jpeg A227C1AB-44FF-48E8-906C-5DC5B2619A8B.jpeg
     
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  8. TLW '90

    TLW '90 One of the Regulars

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    I don't think I actually have any 100% wool.

    I love wool for layering and because it's really warm without having to be heavy.

    My woolrich barn jacket is unlined and it's been fine for what I wear with it,but a lining would add some versatility for sure.
     
  9. TLW '90

    TLW '90 One of the Regulars

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    This vest from C&C sutlery out of Idaho was a pretty good deal.
    Made to order in the US for $80 + shipping for the unlined and $90 lined, add $10 if you want a shorter or longer one.
    [​IMG]
    I'm going to get another in a different color , and go shorter this time.

    I'm sure it's not the best wool ever for the price and it's most likely not 100% wool but overall it's pretty nice for what it costs.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2021
  10. El Marro

    El Marro Call Me a Cab

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    Very nice Super!
    Who made that?
     
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  11. Superfluous

    Superfluous My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Thanks. Freewheelers Brodovitch
     
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  12. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton One Too Many

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    I'm probably wrong here, but when I think of a mackinaw, I think of a cape element that extends down the sleeves, so a double mackinaw is redundant. A single layer, even with just a shoulder cape, is a cruiser. I realize many of the Hudson Bay blanket coats are also called mackinaw, so that would refute my definition. I'm prepared to be lessoned on this.
     
  13. Peacoat

    Peacoat Bartender Bartender

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    For warmth and comfort, it's hard to beat wool. I have 15 peacoats, which should be of no surprise to anyone. Also have an old lined Woolrich (probably 1980s) with the thick wool, and a recent unlined Filson with a much lighter shell. Somewhere I have a Filson vest with the same shell as the coat.

    If I remember correctly, the plaid Filsons have a thicker shell than the solid color Filsons. Both of my Filsons are solid, so the wool is a bit lighter. If I had it to do over, I would have gone with a plaid.
     
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  14. Canuck Panda

    Canuck Panda Practically Family

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    Meet the Filsons

    48C032E6-4F41-4EED-AA23-F0603B1432FA.jpeg

    The vintage 32oz isn’t much thicker than the 28oz from 10 years ago, but both are a lot thicker than the current 24 oz.
    The Made in Nicaragua mackinaw shirt is thicker and warmer than the made in Seattle ones now. But it’s also lined.
    Best Filson products are the Jac shirts. Period. 21oz luxury wool. Feels soft like cashmere, but thick like mackinaw.
    Blanket type wool advertise as 100 percent wool but it’s more like 80/20 or worse. Pendleton did a press on that before. They still supply Filson with the thicker wool cloth. Nylon is used to lock the wool fabric ends, hence no 100 percent wool possible in cloth form. Some are more honest than others.
    Filson vests are overpriced. I have them but they are not worth it. Your
    C&C will be better choice.

    Blanket type wool coats are really for the outdoors. It’s like wearing a blanket. The ultimate Mackinaws would be made from Hudson Bay blankets and sewn together by the Natives. Mackinaws actually evolved from British great wool coats to the shortened version we see today. Crombie still makes the original great coat. Heirloom quality stuff.

    Harris Tweed is the underdog here in the world of wool clothing. It’s more sweater like, worsted wool. 18oz Harris Tweed outperforms any blanket wool coats. Period. It’s what I wear most days now. Some of the older ones can have a funky smell due to sheep urine. But that’s rare in today’s supply. Go Harris tweed!
     
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  15. TLW '90

    TLW '90 One of the Regulars

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    That seems to fit what I know of the utmost traditional Mackinaw, but I don't really know what the rule may be for when a jacket is or isn't a Mackinaw.

    I think these days Filsons design is just what people think of when they hear the term, and I'm certainly guilty of this myself.
    The first time I've heard the term and seen it used my a manufacturer is Filson, because there are few others left.

    I call the woolrich I have coming a Mackinaw cruiser, because I don't really know what else I'd call it.
    Definitely not woolrich's classic hunting coat.

    It is a Woolrich example of a pattern Filson calls a Mackinaw cruiser, and as far as I know that's a jacket type / style that's not necessarily Filson specific so I felt comfortable using the term here.
    ( I don't use brand names as general terms )

    When I think of a Cruiser I think of it having the rear map pocket a Timber cruiser would need, but I realize now that hunting coats often have this as well because really anybody outdoors in the winter could need a map.


    Maybe I don't actually know what a Mackinaw or Mackinaw cruiser is.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2021
  16. TLW '90

    TLW '90 One of the Regulars

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    Si I looked through the update Mackinaw thread ( all I found before was the 1 single page) and the link to hunting jackets.

    I think this is more of a type of hunting jacket, but filson called their version of this a Mackinaw cruiser for some reason.

    I guess it would technically get counted these days, but what everybody blindly accepts in ignorance and what actually is are two different things.



    So what is the inbound woolrich " classic " I posted ?
    A hunting jacket ? ( not the iconic style people know of woolrich)
    A Mackinaw cruiser?

    I would like to determine the most appropriate thing to call it.
     
  17. Canuck Panda

    Canuck Panda Practically Family

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    The Woolrich you got coming is more "cape coat" which has double layers on shoulder and arm, and hence the cape name. It's same as a double mac cruiser with different pockets. My cape coats do not have the map pocket in the back so that's a bonus. The American timber cruisers will have the four pocket setup while the original from the old country would more or less be like an Aero Barnstormer.
     
  18. TLW '90

    TLW '90 One of the Regulars

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    I only see the filson and stuff with an actual cape in my Google searches , but it definitely fits the description of Filsons Mackinaw Cape coat exactly.

    I'm guessing this style or nomenclature for this style is just kind of mostly lost these days ?
    It seems Cape just has a much more literal meaning these days.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2021
  19. Canuck Panda

    Canuck Panda Practically Family

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    The original wool coats would have double layer on the yokes (front and back) and arms, to protect the person from the elements. This was a very effective design. But cost more money to make. That's my theory why it was scratched over time. It's one of the best small invention in everyday life. Try it in the rain or snow and you will see. Your pants will be soaked before your upper body feel any damp.

    Check the labels, your Woolrich might still be all made in USA, cloth and sewing it together. And the wool cloth would be the thicker variant. The new ones even made in USA are made from thinner imported wool cloths.
     
  20. TLW '90

    TLW '90 One of the Regulars

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    It's faint but I can definitely make out MADE IN USA.
    I wouldn't have bought it unless I at least thought it was American made.

    What I can make out in the label I posted seems to read.

    15% nylon
    MADE IN USA
    FABRIQUE AUX
    See reverse for care
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2021
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