Men's Fashions Jay Rose & Co. Chicago Fall/Winter 1927-8

Discussion in 'Suits' started by rlk, Nov 17, 2010.

  1. rlk

    rlk I'll Lock Up

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    Last edited: Nov 17, 2010
  2. rlk

    rlk I'll Lock Up

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    6,100
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    Jay Rose & Co. 1927-1928 cont.

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  3. WH1

    WH1 Practically Family

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    Thank you for sharing these, they are great. Beautiful details.
     
  4. Derek WC

    Derek WC Banned

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    Gee-whiz, looks like the notch lapel tuxedo isn't a modern abomination. :eusa_doh:
     
  5. Hap Hapablap

    Hap Hapablap One of the Regulars

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    The illustrator was probably drunk. He also drew all of the bottom jacket buttons buttoned! ;)
     
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    delightful post
     
  7. apba1166

    apba1166 A-List Customer

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    They sure knew how to wear their chins in those days.
     
  8. Richard Warren

    Richard Warren Practically Family

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    The "Tuxedos" also appear to have flap pockets.
     
  9. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    and you get a prince albert for 3$ with them... :whistling


    Thank you for the scans. Although the cut of 1920s suits isn't my favourite style I really love the illustrations.
     
  10. Guttersnipe

    Guttersnipe One Too Many

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    I was noticed both of those points as well. Another thing I thought was interesting was that the silhouette, particularly on the sack suits, is so much more squared-off than what you see just s few years later.
     
  11. scottyrocks

    scottyrocks I'll Lock Up

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    What a great peek into the advertising world of the past. Thanks for posting these!
     
  12. Fletch

    Fletch I'll Lock Up

    The sack must really have gone into hiding after 1930. You don't see the word used anymore, and almost all jackets are darted and hourglassed. Being a well-upholstered fat cat wasn't something a man wanted to flaunt!

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    The "Full Box Effect" might have worked in 1903 with a high bowler hat, but in 1928, ouch!

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    About the Ulster coats, here's a definition of the style: 6x3 DB front, stout protective collar, thick welt, patch-flap pockets (No. 726 has only the flap), cuffed sleeves, and tweed or similar heavy goods. Puristically, real Donegal tweed (I'm sure these weren't).
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2010
  13. scotrace

    scotrace Head Bartender Staff Member

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    THANK YOU for posting this. Wonderful stuff.
     
  14. fluteplayer07

    fluteplayer07 One Too Many

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    Fantastic as usual rlk! Thanks for sharing. I was surprised too by all the 'sack' cuts... Things changed quite a bit in two years into the heavily fitted and definitive hourglass shapes through the 40's.
     
  15. Undertow

    Undertow My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Des Moines, IA, US
    I have to echo this point. I was actually surprised by the notch lapel in panel 10. I honestly didn't expect to see that.
     
  16. Chicago Jimmy

    Chicago Jimmy Familiar Face

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    69
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    Chicago
    These are excellent!! Thank you for your time to add these.
     

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