Moth remedies ? That aren't mothballs or chinese "aromatic cedar" ?

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by Trust But Verify, Mar 19, 2011.

  1. Trust But Verify

    Trust But Verify New in Town

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    Hi - does anyone have any novel remedies for destroying or (to a less preferable extent) deterring &*^%$#@ moths? I've now seen the last of my favorite wool sweaters destroyed - perforated by the damned pests. It's not like they chew the cellulose in a @$#!%& straight line, either. Seriously becoming insane over this. The pity is that these were all very well made, mostly U.S. and European-made garments, that were actually crafted with a sense of style, fit and proper finish. It goes without saying that these are qualities that are difficult to find these days in our time of outsourcing.

    I'm not crazy about mothballs, and the "aromatic cedar" products available these day are (a) from china, and (b) last almost a whole 3 weeks before they become totally inert. Seriously wtf?

    Anyway - my apologies for the late night ballistic rant, but any guidance or interesting ideas from my lounge colleagues would be most appreciated. There are many highly intelligent people in here so I'm positive that a solution exists. I was thinking perhaps some sort of inexpensive supersonic technology from maybe the SkyMall catalog that causes any &*^%$#@ moths that are even beginning to contemplate coming near my place to simultaneously (a) explode, and (b) burst into flames.

    Cheers!
     
  2. They are almost certainly living in your carpet. They don't fly in from outside (they don't fly very well at all). Have the house fumigated. If you're bringing in vintage or used clothing of uncertain provenance, 24 hours in the deep freeze is sufficient to kill any adults and larvae. I usually allow at least 48 hours in deep freeze just to be sure. Also, there are "moth traps" that you can buy that have a pheromone that attracts the females and they stick to the fly paper in the trap. No females: no larvae.

    How are you storing your stuff? The moths love darkness. Wardrobes, and piles of clothes that don't get moved very much, are perfect for them.

    There are various types of insect that eat animal fibres. Are you certain it's moths? Not carpet beetles?
     
  3. Trust But Verify

    Trust But Verify New in Town

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    Your advice is very much appreciated, Baron. Truth be told, the beetle theory may make even more sense...I have never really seen moths, but I have noticed what I thought were flour beetles. I will look into pest control. Thanks again!
     
  4. Trust But Verify

    Trust But Verify New in Town

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    I do have sweaters folded in a closed wardrobe. My vintage pea coats and leather I keep in a broad canvas garment bag hanging in my closet.
     
  5. Zemke Fan

    Zemke Fan Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,691
    Location:
    On Hiatus. Really. Or Not.
    I believe there are several threads on this forum and others that deal with moths. BK gives the basic advice. Moths can't survive freezing, sunlight, and dry cleaning. ALL garments must be dry cleaned BEFORE being put away for the season. No exceptions. I've heard it takes longer than 24 hours to kill the adults/larvae in the refrigerator.
     
  6. For long term storage there are those plastic bags that you vacuum out the air. The freezer may work to kill eggs and larva as listed above. Another long term storage idea is to get a sealable container like the new clean 5 gallon buckets for paint, pack the wool items in there and take a container of CO2 or some dry ice and bleed it into the container. CO2 is heavy and will displace the oxygen in the bucket, when you figure it is full seal the top. Bugs can't live long without oxygen. People use this technique to store grain, but nitrogen is better for foods.
     
  7. kools

    kools Practically Family

    Messages:
    680
    Location:
    Milwaukee
    Oh yeah...get all your suits made with "Moth-Tex-Shun".

    [​IMG]
     
  8. -30-

    -30- A-List Customer

    Messages:
    444
    Location:
    TORONTO, CANADA
    These yellow, hang-up things used to be known as SHELL, VAPONA NO PEST STRIPS, now renamed Home Defence Max by Ortho. They don't instantly kill bugs,

    but will do the job after a couple of days and should be great for carpet beetles/fleas/moths, etc.

    Useful life is 4 months in a relatively closed space.


    Regards,
    J T
     
  9. lordwinters

    lordwinters Familiar Face

    Messages:
    58
    Location:
    Suecia, Quite so town.
    I have heard that a full week in minus 20 degrees celsius is needed to kill off the eggs, two days is not enough. I luckily do not have a moth infestation but I always freeze newly arrived garments for a week minimum, I currently have an overcoat that has been in the freezer for two months, which I'll most like keep in there till fall comes.
     
  10. Eddie Derbyshire

    Eddie Derbyshire Practically Family

    Messages:
    849
    Location:
    Riddings, Derbyshire, UK
    Gosh I'd never heard of freezing garments! You literally bag it and put it in your freezer? There's no damage to the fibres or anything?

    Luckily (touch wood) I've never had a massive problem with moths. I tend to keep a lot of my stuff outside of wardrobes on rails, and regularly get everything out and 'beat it' - just energetically pat it down to make any moths/larvae fall out. Obviously that's just preventative. I do use some Lavender and Cedar oil soap, that I've cut into chunks and put in little gauze baggies that I hang in my wardrobes that have tweeds/wool in them. I haven't had any problems, so that might be working!
     
  11. Claudio

    Claudio Vendor

    Messages:
    375
    Location:
    Italian living in Spain
    Sunlight and regular airing out of the closet is VERY helpful. Prevention is the key here. Good luck
     
  12. lordwinters

    lordwinters Familiar Face

    Messages:
    58
    Location:
    Suecia, Quite so town.
    I don't even bag them, just toss them in! And no it doesn't damage the fibres, as there are no fluids involved no ice is formed and thus nothing happens apart from the demise of any eventual unwanted guests. If they can handle the Swedish winter, which often drops below -20 celsius I think they can handle the freezer. :)
     
  13. Eddie Derbyshire

    Eddie Derbyshire Practically Family

    Messages:
    849
    Location:
    Riddings, Derbyshire, UK
    Hah! Crikey. I'd better clear out my frozen chips and fish fingers then! Thanks for the advice :)

    Sent from my GT-I9195 using Tapatalk
     

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