My Glamour Gal

Discussion in 'The Front Parlor' started by 2jakes, Dec 13, 2014.

  1. 2jakes

    2jakes I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,680
    Location:
    Alamo Heights ☀️ Texas
    This is my ma when she was 19 & one month away from giving birth to
    yours truly. :eusa_clap


    [​IMG]
     
  2. sheeplady

    sheeplady I'll Lock Up Bartender

    What a nice photo!

    I'm not much for wearing flowers in my hair, but the one time I did it frequently was when I was pregnant to "even" myself out. haha
     
  3. 2jakes

    2jakes I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,680
    Location:
    Alamo Heights ☀️ Texas
    Thank You & ...Hey...we all do what we can to make it thru the day....:eusa_clap

    I just got off the line with my ma . She is 92 yrs. young ( last August ).
    I asked her about the flower on the hair . She said to tell you that it was the style back in the 40s. Same thing with the
    shoulder pads like Joan Crawford used to wear in the movies. She said they would try to look like the glamour gals from
    Hollywood. Even painting the line on the back of the legs to make it look like they were wearing hosiery . Not sure
    what that means . She has a good memory for the past...but not about today. I told her I would call again in the
    morning to go have breakfast.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    [​IMG]
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    This is the photo of my ma my daddy carried with him when he was overseas during WW2.
    I tried to clean up as much as possible with photoshop the dark stains .
    Dad gave it to me before he passed away last Feb.
    I promised him I'd keep it. My ma also agrees that I should have it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2014
  4. sheeplady

    sheeplady I'll Lock Up Bartender

    That's a nice photo too, and such history. You are so very lucky to have the photo, the story, and your mother! :)

    With the painting the line on the back of the legs, they were "painting" the seam to look like they had seamed stockings on, which were difficult to get during the war. They normally used eyeliner or eye pencil to do it. :) The powers that be tried to get women to switch to knee socks but most ladies didn't, it was more something for young girls (children).

    I am sorry that your mother's memory for today isn't as good. My husband's grandmother suffered from severe dementia to the point where she regressed and couldn't even remember her children or husband. But the last time my husband went to see her, it was very early in the morning and she said, hello using his name, and asked about several relatives (uncles and cousins). She was totally lucid for about 10 minutes. It was an amazing treat for my husband, whom she hadn't recognized for about 5 years.
     
  5. 2jakes

    2jakes I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,680
    Location:
    Alamo Heights ☀️ Texas
    Glad to hear about your husband's grandmother & that he was able to communicate with her. I can relate the same
    with my dad's last months. He no longer recalled a thing. But last time at the hospital. I whispered in his ears "come on daddy get better so we can go home..back to Laredo...ok daddy ?...Nurse says I gotta go..."
    There were tears in his eyes & although he still couldn't speak he held tight to my hand.
    My brother & sisters were astonished because they had not been able to get a response at all even though they had tried.
    I asked the nurse if I could stay just a little bit longer. That was the last time I saw my daddy.

    Btw: to stay on topic...I found out what the "glamour gals" did with regards to their legs !
    [​IMG]
    and this is the link..you have to scroll down . Hope you will like !
    http://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=...Xw63WKBcWi3VEQMVae9tbVbw&ust=1418703343885933
     
  6. Stray Cat

    Stray Cat My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Without any intention on being anything other than polite, I must say: THAT is THE photo to carry out to war! The lady looks gorgeous, and her face is having some calming feel to it. So, yes: that is a face one could look at, for comfort and joy.
    Your family has an interesting history, sir.
     

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