Want to buy or sell something? Check the classifieds

NRA RING~ HAS ANYONE SEEN ANOTHER LIKE IT?

Rick Blaine

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,958
Location
Saskatoon, SK CANADA
cpg32oA
https://imgur.com/a/cpg32oA[/IMG]
s-l500.jpg


The opposite side has the numbers '37
But the NRA was found to be unconstitutional in '35
WHAT am I to make of this mystery?
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,083
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
There were tons of Blue Eagle merchandise produced during 1933, especially -- any kind of a gimcrack that could have the logo impressed upon it was manfuactured and sold. It became something of a scandal when it was discovered that a lot of this dime-store paraphernalia was being stamped out in factories that did not, in fact, comply with NRA codes.

I'm going to guess that it's a novelty ring made for high-school or college kids, and the "37" is meant to represent a class year. The Class of '37 would have been freshmen when the NRA was at the peak of its popularity.
 

Rick Blaine

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,958
Location
Saskatoon, SK CANADA
There were tons of Blue Eagle merchandise produced during 1933, especially -- any kind of a gimcrack that could have the logo impressed upon it was manfuactured and sold. It became something of a scandal when it was discovered that a lot of this dime-store paraphernalia was being stamped out in factories that did not, in fact, comply with NRA codes.

I'm going to guess that it's a novelty ring made for high-school or college kids, and the "37" is meant to represent a class year. The Class of '37 would have been freshmen when the NRA was at the peak of its popularity.


BRILLIANT ANALYSIS !

Thanks. I knew one of y'all would have some info to give me a better handle on this.
 

MondoFW

Practically Family
Messages
852
What an impressive find. Can anyone simply explain why the NRA was deemed unconstitutional?
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,083
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
A Brooklyn poultry processor named Schechter was cited for violating the NRA code governing the poultry industry in New York City by, among other acts disregarding its wage-hour requirements, by selling unsanitary poultry in violation of municipal law, by refusing to allow inspections of his facilities, and by making false reports on its compliance with the codes. Schechter brought suit against the NRA contending that the imposition of the codes were a usurpation of Congressional lawmaking authority, and the court, which was virulently anti-Roosevelt, agreed. And that was the end of the National Industrial Recovery Act.
 

Just Jim

A-List Customer
Messages
307
Location
The wrong end of Nebraska . . . .
Saw a partial display case of similar rings, minus the year. They were originally under-the-counter merchandise in a small-town general store; when I saw them they were in the basement, along with almost a hundred years of other flotsam and jetsam of unsold merchandise. They were packed in one of those slotted ring displays, like you see at flea markets. Nothing special, as I recall the original price was <$1.

No, I didn't buy one. The only ones remaining wouldn't even fit me as a pinky ring.
 

Tiki Tom

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,595
Location
Oahu, North Polynesia
Yes, I just googled National Recovery Administration and that is their logo and motto. That ring is a fascinating bit of 1930s history.

I hope Lizzie weighs in on this topic.
 
Last edited:

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,083
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
It's hard to overstate just how popular the NRA was during its early months. NRA parades were held in every town of any size, people wore the Blue Eagle everywhere it could be worn -- some even had it tattooed on -- and industries fell all over each other in the rush to draft codes. These codes were prepared not just by the government, but by representatives of industry and labor as well, working in unison.

It was the involvement of labor -- specifically labor's success in obtaining wage and hour regulations and guarantees of the right to collective bargaining in the codes -- that turned industry against the NRA, and led the National Association of Manufacturers to push for a test case weighing its legality. Even Hearst had supported the NRA at first, assuming that it would give business the right to form cartels -- but when it became clear that labor would have a strong say in the codes, he turned furiously against it.

The irony of the whole case is that the National Industrial Recovery Act was due to expire a few days after the Supreme Court ruled against it, and the Roosevelt Administration had no intention of seeking to extend its lifespan since it had largely served its purpose. It was only ever intended as a temporary measure.
 

Rick Blaine

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,958
Location
Saskatoon, SK CANADA
Saw a partial display case of similar rings, minus the year. They were originally under-the-counter merchandise in a small-town general store; when I saw them they were in the basement, along with almost a hundred years of other flotsam and jetsam of unsold merchandise. They were packed in one of those slotted ring displays, like you see at flea markets. Nothing special, as I recall the original price was <$1.

No, I didn't buy one. The only ones remaining wouldn't even fit me as a pinky ring.

These are marked Sterling and fitted.
 

scotrace

Head Bartender
Staff member
Messages
14,347
Location
Small Town Ohio, USA
Ha!

Dick Powell slumming it.
Over the top dialog.
Washington with radio network standard trained speech.
WILSON! In their company? Hardly.
 
Top