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Old gas stations

Ghostsoldier

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,374
Location
Starke, Florida, USA
D-X pump jockeys.
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Rob
 

Ghostsoldier

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,374
Location
Starke, Florida, USA
Not necessarily a gas station, but related:
11322 racer.jpg

Photo of "Modern Speed," a statue by Finn Frolich located on Redondo Boulevard, near Inglewood. Frolich modeled the driver after racer Tommy Milton. The sculpture served as a model for large-scale monuments installed at Richfield service stations around the region as advertisements. Photo dated: May 24, 1926.

Rob
 

The Reno Kid

A-List Customer
Messages
361
Location
Back in the Biggest Little City
My first post here in a looooong time. My first real paying job was as a pump jockey in a Chevron station in the mid-to-late '70s, when I was in high school. I had a uniform and everything. If things were slow, I also did oil changes and lube jobs, as well as tire mounting and balancing. We had a professional mechanic for the big stuff. Every car that stopped for gas got the full treatment: wash the windshield; check the oil, transmission fluid, water level, tire pressure, and basically anything else the customer wanted. It was a lot of fun.

Strangely enough, we had both a Chevron and a Standard station in the same small town (<1,000 people). The color schemes and graphics were identical, except the one I worked at had "Chevron" on the shield, while the other one had "Standard." I think the difference was that Standard was company-owned, while Chevron was franchised. Both were Standard Oil of California. There was also a Shell and a Union 76 in town. We were on a fairly major highway and there was enough long-distance traffic to support four gas stations.
 

tonyb

I'll Lock Up
Messages
9,739
Location
My mother's basement
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 1965. I'd love to have that stretched Suburban!

View attachment 412976
Remember airline limousines? They were usually sedans or station wagons stretched to have four doors on each side — a fairly common sight in the early 1960s.

The last ones I recall seeing were a pair of Checkers left to rust away in a lot in Olympia, Washington. That was going on 10 years ago now.
 

tonyb

I'll Lock Up
Messages
9,739
Location
My mother's basement
The church that hosted the Boy Scout troop I was in back in the early 1970s had a pair of Checkers.

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Yup. The pair I alluded to were the same model. I showed them to a friend who owned (and still owns) a ’66 Marathon, to satisfy his curiosity, mostly. He determined, as any sane person would, that those two airline limos were so far gone as to be good for parts only, and not many of them. He’d already sunk a borderline crazy amount into restoring his regular old Marathon sedan. “I did it for the same reason people climb mountains,” he said.
 

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