Want to buy or sell something? Check the classifieds

Photos of hatters tools

OT1899

Familiar Face
Messages
80
Location
Texas
Mr. Astor - I never realized about the pins in the ribbon - I'm tempted to go down and take the pins out of all my ribbons - thanks for the hint.

Not a bad idea. I have a couple rolls of vintage ribbon that had pins in them that had rusted, which consequently left "rusty" spots in the ribbon. Quite disappointing to say the least. I removed the pins but did not toss the ribbon. Has anyone had the same problem and figured out how to remove the spots?

Thanks!
 

Mr.Astor

Banned
Messages
246
Location
New Jersey
Trust me on woven edge ribbons from before 1940,a 1 inch pin can ruin a roll! Steam or water won't close the hole on a high quality ribbon. I have had my money refunded numerous times because of this. Look at it close,the hole is evident! I couldn't in good conscience sell a hat with that defect. Petersham you can use steam, but a silky soft true grosgrain the hole remains.
 

TheDane

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,670
Location
Copenhagen, Denmark
My experiences are somewhere in between - closest to Brad's. Most everytime, a few drops of cold water will work. Sometimes the needle rusts, and gets really hard stuck in the fabric, though. Then the only solution, I know of, is to use the ribbon between the holes for bows, knots and contrast-bits - and then use the undamaged part closer to the center for the ribbon around the crown.

For round bolts, I use a piece of cardboard as wide as the ribbon. I wrap it around the ribbon (between the flanges of the bolt) and secure it with a rubber-band. That way the force of the thin rubber-band gets more evenly distributed over the entire width of the ribbon - and it won't as easily press a groove into the ribbon.

Oval bolts (i.e. French "Vialaton & Martin") I wind up on round spools. All ribbon will fade over time, but if it's wound upon round spools, it will fade evenly over the entire length. Less at the center, and more and more as you get closer to the perimeter. Oval bolts tend to fade most in the ends, which results in a banding effect (= less useable).
 
Last edited:

Hatter4

One of the Regulars
Messages
226
Location
East Petersburg, PA
John, I think it was sold by Stetson because I got it in a bunch of tools and supplies from a hatter's family in Binghamton, NY - he was called True Hatters.
 

DOGMAN

One Too Many
Messages
1,624
Location
Northeast Ohio
Thanks,bowerman.I tend to use whatever I have around the house.The cloth is like a light canvas cloth.The string is a 1/8" polyester cord.Learned how to make a hatters knot that really helped.
 

John Galt

Vendor
Messages
2,080
Location
Chico
Dogman, you can get cotton duck cloth at any fabric store at a decent price. You don't have to buy it from that eBay seller at hundreds. It's also a light canvas but is furry on one side so you don't transfer any of the weave to the hat.

I agree with Hatter4, you've got it nice & tight, which is good. For a hatter's cord, I'm using parachute cord with the inside strands pulled out. It holds well, especially when pre- whetted, & is strong.

The hatter's knot is crucial, IMHO. Thanks to Olė for sharing a while back. I leave a tail with an extra knot, so it's easier to pull apart.
 

John Galt

Vendor
Messages
2,080
Location
Chico
John Galt,I will see about getting some cotton duck cloth.I too thank him for the hatters knot.I couldn't remember where I saw it.

It is basically a cotton flannel, in white or off white. If you have trouble finding it, look at the historical re-enactment web stores. It was apparently used for britches in revolutionary or civil war times, and you can pick it up at such sites.
 

John Galt

Vendor
Messages
2,080
Location
Chico
Njaaahhh ... "cotton flannel" and "cotton duck" are two different types of fabric. Flannel has traditionally been used for flanging cloth

You are correct sir. I misspoke. I bought cotton flannel (moleskin, I think), for flanging cloth & cotton duck (canvas) for my flanging bag.
 
Last edited:
Top