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Pocket Knife

shadowrider

One of the Regulars
Messages
258
Location
Italy
Great thread! I have a passion for (and a small collection of) Swiss Army knives, as well as single bladed tradititional folders.
This is my latest acquisition:
Nista 19mm, comprato - 1.JPG

It's an Italian traditional "fisherman" knife. It's handmade, with the handle made out of solid water buffalo horn tip, and the external spring screwed onto it.
The notch at the end of the handle had supposedly the purpose of helping untangle fishing nets.
 

Benzadmiral

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,815
Location
The Swamp
The CRKT M-16 arrived yesterday, and I'm very much impressed by its look, the fine detail and fit-and-finish. Using the flipper, I can sweep the blade out without any trouble. Currently I'm working on closing it with one hand. Perhaps I need to look at a spring-assisted opening knife next time. But this is an excellent pocket knife.
 

Musher

One of the Regulars
Messages
233
Location
Middleburgh. New York
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I never thought about carrying a dress pocket knife but I have a lot of knives and think it is a good idea. I narrowed down to three lockbacks, a handforged carbon steel model with wood handle, a Buck 110, and a Rough Rider with bone handle.
 

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johnnycanuck

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,870
Location
Alberta
I like simple classic designs and this one fits the bill. Opinel folder.

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That looks far too shiny for a carbon steel blade.
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Should look a little more like this. [emoji12]
Keep you knife sharp.
Johnny


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crawlinkingsnake

A-List Customer
Messages
419
Location
West Virginia
My father, a WWII vet, who grew up in the country ALWAYS carried his trusty "Tree Brand". Fact is he sharpened it so much the blade was worn down. But needless to say, sharp enough to shave with. I've never carried a pocket knife and he always gave me "what for" about it. I miss my dad.
 

tropicalbob

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,956
Location
miami, fl
I've carried a little 3" Swiss Army for years and have it attached to my key-chain. What a wonderful, useful invention.
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
23,279
Location
London, UK
But a switchblade has an awesomeness factor that a one hand opener does not. :D

The classic flick-knife is a beautiful piece of design; always makes me think of Henry Fonda in Twelve Angry Men.

"Switchblades" were outlawed in 1958 because, of all things, they were featured in a lot of juvenile delinquent movies, popular in the '50s. Think " Rebel Without a Cause." By the '90s, when the gangs were armed with military-grade firearms, it seemed silly to ban a pocket knife because it opened with a spring instead of a thumbnail. I don't know if the ban was ever rescinded, but they are sold openly now. I have several. Local laws may restrict them, so you still may be subject to arrest, depending on how the cop who busted you is feeling that day.

They've been illegal in the UK for much the same time. The Restriction of Offensive Weapons Act 1959, which took effect 13 June 1959, in part was inspired by the US ban of 1958. Probably get away worth possessing one at home (as long as you inherited it, or were the original owner who bought it pre-ban - the main offence is in selling rather than owning, though if you bought one now you could technically be open to a charge of aiding and abetting the sale), but it would be illegal to buy and get there, and given I could never take it out anywhere and use it, seems a bit of a waste. I can see the point; it's unlikely anyone with a legitimate reason to use the knife will ever need one that opens that quickly, whereas they were often put to criminal use because they could be easily concealed within handy reach, and whipped out to attack very quickly. Once no longer able to easily obtain a switchblade, the Teddy boys took to carrying straight razors...which probably did as much and more harm to those trying to wield them as the intended targets. Gravity knives are included in the same ban, which is why re-enactors in the UK can only buy adapted versions of repro paratrooper knives.

A bit outside the scope of one handers but I have about a dozen of these small toothpicks by Case with different handles

View attachment 90903

Those are nice.... Case have been around a long time, haven't they? Mark Twain mentions them in Huckleberry Finn - as I recall in quite an unflattering light!

I like simple classic designs and this one fits the bill. Opinel folder.

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Have one of these I bought in France years ago. Still trying to figure out whether the rotating collar constitutes a 'lock' for UK legal purposes.

You can't carry a large blade like a Bowie knife in your vehicle or on your person just for the sake of it in the UK ? How about a hatchet?

No on the Bowie knife... though TBH I can't think of why anyone would want to carry something like that as a 'just in case' as opposed to a weapon, so it's not a restriction that causes any complaint, really. WRT the hatchett, as long as you have a good reason to be carrying it at the time at which you were stopped by the police, it'd be fine. Technically it could be a problem if you had it lying in the car 'just because', though I suspect as long as you were reasonable, most plod would be likely to let you off with a warning and/or confiscation if they thought it was an innocent mistake, which would definitely not be the case with a bowie knife, ever. At least or now, a hatchett is not really perceived as a weapon in the same way as a knife, though that might well change if they become popular with gang kids. In reality in day to day UK life, though, very few people have any need to carry one around, or often even own a hatchett - bearing in mind that fewer and fewer folks here have an open fire at home, and there are neither quite the same wide open spaces as in the US, nor the same hunting culture.
 

Jaxenro

One of the Regulars
Messages
254
I have always wanted a decent swordstick just because it seemed like the gentlemanly thing to carry but most of the ones made today are horriblr
 

Haversack

One Too Many
Messages
1,192
Location
Clipperton Island
My EDC pocketknife is a Victorinox Economy, (2 blades, scissors, bottle opener, can opener, corkscrew, & reaming awl), that I bought for 12 marks in a hardware store in Germany in 1982. (Realization struck that what is sold as 'luxury' in the States is often utilitarian elsewhere). Emblems on the scales have long worn away. Blade shapes have altered considerably through keeping them sharp. It has saved my life at least once. Nowadays the corkscrew gets the most use.

For dresswear, a carbon steel Laguiole with corkscrew and juniper wood scales.

There were a fair number of patents issued after the American Civil War for pocketknives that could be opened one-handed. (Something like 50,000 amputees). The Duluth Trading Company sell the one designed for John Wesley Powell of Grand Canyon fame.
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
23,279
Location
London, UK
I have always wanted a decent swordstick just because it seemed like the gentlemanly thing to carry but most of the ones made today are horriblr

Most modern production models I've seen overseas are more sort of cosplay items, really. I've handled a very nice one that belonged to a friend - an original Victorian piece. They're legal to own in the UK as long as they're over 100 yeas old, but, of course, can't be taken out in public. Which makes it a nice curio, but really only a display item. That said, though, I can't quite imagine being in a situation nowadays where I felt the need of drawing one! A good, solid stick in a traditional style like the Cold Steel polymer ones has a strong appeal.
 

Jaxenro

One of the Regulars
Messages
254
Most modern production models I've seen overseas are more sort of cosplay items, really. I've handled a very nice one that belonged to a friend - an original Victorian piece. They're legal to own in the UK as long as they're over 100 yeas old, but, of course, can't be taken out in public. Which makes it a nice curio, but really only a display item. That said, though, I can't quite imagine being in a situation nowadays where I felt the need of drawing one! A good, solid stick in a traditional style like the Cold Steel polymer ones has a strong appeal.

The best I have seen for modern ones is probably the Hanwei greyhound model it looks fairly classic and gets good reviews as sturdy and functional. As I understand it my Georgia weapons permit covers all concealed legal weapons so knives with blades of any length, even sword length, are legal to carry in public. I can't see a situation where I would ever draw it in public although I used to be a fair hand with a sabre having fenced for 15 odd years. But I would rather rely on whatever pistol or revolver is in my front pocket if a defensive situation arose. I guess I just like the idea of it. I would love a quality original Victorian era one but then I would probably never take it out of the house much less use it for walking
 

Hemingway Jones

I'll Lock Up
Bartender
Messages
6,099
Location
Acton, Massachusetts
I carry a Spyderco Delica with a non serrated edge because when you get tape into those serrations, it's tough to come out. I like Spyderco because they are no nonsense knives and very handy with the clip. I've been carrying them since the mid-90s. My latest is rescue orange because I lost two black ones in the garden.

I also have a Buck 110 and a Buck 112 and they are very impressive, well-made, and extremely sharp. I love these, but don't like to have things on my belt and so I carry them less.

I have a Benchmade CQC by my bed for peace of mind, a K-Bar in my study, and a Helle knife that is the sharpest knife i have ever encountered.

I also have a Laguiole knife that was custom made for me with my name in cursive on the blade and it's made of bull horn. It also has the punch.

I keep the larger Swiss Army knife in the Jeep along with a Gerber multi-tool. I pretty much always have a knife nearby.
 

robrinay

One Too Many
Messages
1,460
Location
Sheffield UK
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Here’s my Victorinox Swiss Tool I seldom carry it in my pocket though as it’s quite heavy. Instead I have a handy little ‘card knife’ in my wallet - it’s a ‘Card Sharp by Iain Sinclair. This is the genuine item designed as a disposable paramedics knife, but sadly there are now plenty of cheap copies around.
 

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