Sewing Lessons & FAQ

Discussion in 'The Powder Room' started by Von Dee, Feb 12, 2006.

  1. SayCici

    SayCici Practically Family

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Virginia
    LD I wish I could absorb what you know about sewing!
     
  2. GoddessMama

    GoddessMama One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    102
    Location:
    AZ
    I have a simlar top in a my pattern book, if I can find it tomorrow I will post it. ;)
     
  3. GoddessMama

    GoddessMama One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    102
    Location:
    AZ
    Ok I can't find my book so this is how you would do this.

    You would start with a basic dress sloper. This is because the dress falls below the waist of the sloper top.

    #1 Find your bust point and draw in the bust circle on your sloper.
    #2 Then you are going to determine where you want your you empire wait to go and cut like this http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_B7Uq4_S3IcQ/ScVuxFgvDMI/AAAAAAAAAaE/C7wFUbIUQNs/s320/emp+back.jpg
    #3 then you would release your shoulder dart to the bust dart, slashing creating your gathers.
    #4 You would draw in your neck line. Remember when you drop your neck line you must accomoate the same amount by taking it off the center fold and at the shoulder line, otherwise you will have a gaping neck hole.
    #4 on your bottom part of your dress slopper slash at the hip line
    #5 instead of using a fold at center on your bodice create your seam allowance.

    Hope this helps, Sory I just don't have time to draft it out right now. lol
     
  4. kamikat

    kamikat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,794
    Location:
    Maryland
    Yes, it is quite breathable, but it can stick to other fabrics, so you will need a slip underneath it. Is it possible that it's called something else where you are? It also might be a regional fabric since it is great for hot, humid summers. If you live where there is a moderate summer, there might not be much demand for it.
     
  5. JupitersDarling

    JupitersDarling One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    221
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Thank you LD and GoddessMama! Between your visualizations and directions, maybe I can figure this out!

    One thing... I am confuzzled at step 4: 'taking if off the center fold & shoulder line'- eh? I've changed necklines on several items before but I don't remember having to adjust the center or shoulder for it.
     
  6. GoddessMama

    GoddessMama One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    102
    Location:
    AZ
    When you lower your neckline you must accomodate for it, other wise you get unsightly gaping in the front instead of a neck line that lays smooth. I was actually mistaken on how much you take in. If you drop your neckline 2 inched you would bring it in 1, or 1/2 the amount you drop. Its old school couture flat patterning methods to get a proper drape. Kamikat don't get mad! I'm using your Eva dress as an example! If you look at her dress here http://newvintage.wordpress.com/2010/05/04/mmm-day-4/ This is why she has the gap and its not laying flat. HTH helps both of you! ;)
    This is an example I did when I took my flat patterning classes. you can see what was taken off to adjust..
    [​IMG]

    This is what your wanting to do with your pattern except your dart and cut will be lower down, under the armsyce and your gathers will be on the bottom instead of the top.. Totally ignore my grade on this one! I got marked down for being late and forgetting to cross out some lines!

    [​IMG]
     
  7. SugarKitten

    SugarKitten One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    127
    Location:
    New England
    My sewing machine and I are on the outs again. New problem this time since the threading/bobbin issue seems wonderfully resolved.

    It refuses to sew down more than a double layer of fabric. I know this sounds nuts, but it started when I was trying to sew down the bias tape on my spiro-print dress. It acts like it's going to sew, and then just pretends (unthreads, or if I hold the end so it can't, chokes on the bobbin thread after it's second or third stitch).

    I am using the same needle and thread as the rest of the project, and it will still sew two pieces of fabric together, but it doesn't seem to like anything thicker. I've tried screwing down the plates tighter to try and give the fabric extra breathing room under the foot, but it hasn't helped. I've got the Nelco (sometimes like Omega) 5102A.

    In an unrelated note - my machine has just the single multi-purpose foot. Is this worthwhile to get even if I don't know I'll need it all?

    http://www.sew4less.com/product/297...orted_Attachment_Kit5011LClick_for_model_info
     
  8. cailinbeag

    cailinbeag Familiar Face

    Messages:
    63
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    bunnyb - Maybe try a search for Tencel.

    SugarKitten - It sounds like you need to go up a needle size. I've had the same trouble you describe and it worked for me. :)
     
  9. GoddessMama

    GoddessMama One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    102
    Location:
    AZ
    I would suggest the same thing. Change your needle to a larger needle, try completely rethreading your machine and bobbin as well. Also check to make your you bobbin tension and thread tension are right. If these all fail it could be a timeing issue and need service.
     
  10. bunnyb.gal

    bunnyb.gal Practically Family

    Messages:
    788
    Location:
    sunny London
    There was a suggestion from Cailinbeag a bit lower down that it may be called Tencel here? It only seems to pop up on Eco websites here (which is actually a good thing, as far as I'm concerned!), not very common. I wonder if viscose is anywhere in the ballpark?

    Well, I hate to say it, but here in the UK, not much of a summer at all! (as I type this I've got two layers on :( and am sitting under a big furry blanket - the fire will probably go on soon...)
     
  11. Tourbillion

    Tourbillion Practically Family

    Messages:
    667
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Un-threading can be caused by not leaving long enough "tail" when you cut the thread or if the thread is breaking, the needle may be too small. Do you replace the needle after every garment or so? If not, it could be bent and it won't sew right until you replace it.

    The "choking" could be too loose tension, incorrect threading, etc. When it does that only at the beginning it can be that the thread is getting caught, and holding it should stop that. I also had a machine that was adjusted so that the door to the bobbin case was too tight, causing thread bunching, but I think that is rare.

    Some machines have a setting for fabric thickness, if you do have one it should be set to thick for more than 2 layers.

    The extra feet can come in handy if you sew clothing, I would want at least the zipper foot, and preferably the buttonhole foot, blind hem and narrow hem foot too. I rarely use other feet than those, but a rolling foot or walking foot is nice for thick or sticky fabrics.
     
  12. kamikat

    kamikat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,794
    Location:
    Maryland
    Tencel is a completely different fabric that's relatively new to the market, maybe only about 10-15years old.
     
  13. bunnyb.gal

    bunnyb.gal Practically Family

    Messages:
    788
    Location:
    sunny London
    Aah, it's all so confusing!
     
  14. SugarKitten

    SugarKitten One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    127
    Location:
    New England
    The needle was too small, I moved up one size, and the problem was completely solved. You are all magic!

    thank you Tourbillion for the advice! I was actually just looking for a zipper foot when I found that set. I didn't know if the rest of them were going to turn out to be things I'd never use. Oh internet shopping, how you tempt me...
     
  15. Tourbillion

    Tourbillion Practically Family

    Messages:
    667
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    You are welcome, sugarkitten.

    BTW, Tencel is for all practical purposes rayon, but it is made with a slightly different process patented by Courtaulds in 1987 (I just looked up the year in wikipedia). There is a difference between Tencel and rayon challis, Tencel is smoother and perhaps a bit glossier and stronger too I think. You could substitute them for each other almost, but they are not the same as vintage spun rayon.

    The factory that produced the vintage rayon burned down in the 80's I've heard. I haven't seen anything that replaces it yet, though I bought some German pebble crepe that is very nice.
     
  16. cailinbeag

    cailinbeag Familiar Face

    Messages:
    63
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    kamikat's right.

    The original Tencel had a similar hand to rayon (though it was actually closer to cotton), but is now found much more commonly in the making of peachskin and stretchy knits. It'd be unlikely you'd find anything suitable in today's market.

    Viscose, on the other hand, you might have some luck with. It's often used in the making of rayon, so much so that, from my research online, it appears that the words "rayon" and "viscose" are somewhat interchangeable in the UK, even though they're not actually the same. Viscose is a bit of a chameleon...it can also be used to reproduce silk, cotton, wool and even linen looking fibers. Watch out, though. Viscose is often combined with polyester, as well.

    All three fabrics, Tencel (also known as lyocell), rayon and viscose are all sort of cousins in that they're made from the cellulose from plant cells. It's how they're used in manufacturing that really sets them apart from each other.

    Another alternative to rayon would be a lightweight wool challis. Obviously, rayon and wool are different, and wool is a touch stiffer, but it still drapes beautifully and isn't too hard to find (though you might find it a touch pricey).
     
  17. Voodoo Kitten

    Voodoo Kitten Familiar Face

    Messages:
    59
    Location:
    San Diego, California
    I'm about half done with my "Walk Away" dress/Butterick 4790

    This is my first pattern and attempt at making a garment. I will post finished pictures tomorrow evening when I am done. :)

    [​IMG]

    I am letting it hang like suggested before hemming and finishing.
     
  18. GoddessMama

    GoddessMama One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    102
    Location:
    AZ
    :eusa_clap It looks fantastic! I made one of those and it looked aweful on me. Its not the dress for me, but I love it on other people. Can't wait to see it done!
     
  19. stark traveller

    stark traveller New in Town

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Colorado
    Sewing skills needed

    I think sewing skills are way under-appreciated, that is until you need them. I am a college student and in the Army Reserve. I have zero sewing skills and being in the Army I run into a lot instances (at least weekly) where sewing would help tremendously. A lot of guys my age seem to think it sounds sissy to want to learn some sewing skills, but I seem some older soldiers sewing on their own patches, sewing rips in their clothing, etc. I saw a younger soldier try to sew on his own patch and it looked like crap. He had to take it to get done at the store. I really think the Army should make a basic guide on sewing for soldiers!
     
  20. December

    December One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    297
    Location:
    Hampshire, England.
    Voodoo Kitten, that looks great. I really love the fabric.

    I just bought material to make my own one yesterday.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.