Want to buy or sell something? Check the classifieds

Sewing Lessons & FAQ

Foster

One of the Regulars
Messages
261
Location
N.C., U.S.A.
I've had times when two zipper teeth on the same side worked in before the next one on the opposing side moved into place. If that is what happened, I would not zip it up, but try to find a way to zip it back down. If the zipper teeth get a little loose or free-moving, this can happen.
It becomes a problem if zipped up because the lack of a proper hold in the teeth causes the two sides to separate, and then it is hard to fix without removing the zipper pull from the top.
 

Joie DeVive

One Too Many
Messages
1,308
Location
Colorado
Thanks folks. I have to be especially careful with this piece, because it is not mine. It's on loan for the fashion show. I can't just replace a zipper, or yank on it. I will check the teeth in the slider as best I can, and take another spin at pulling it down, but if that doesn't work, I'll use a little lubricant and see if a tiny pull up won't get things moving. Cross your fingers for me! ;)
 

Joie DeVive

One Too Many
Messages
1,308
Location
Colorado
Success!!!!!
Thank you everybody for your input. In the end, it did turn out to need to be pulled up. I was actually telling one of the other ladies working this project with me about the trouble I'd been having, and she just grabbed it and pulled it up, and then down, and that was that!
 

Nick D

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,166
Location
Upper Michigan
I have a question on seam finish that I'm hoping someone can help with. I'm making an outfit for my wife from a 1950s pattern (New York 1403), which has a shirt, blouse, and bolero. It will be an unlined summer outfit, with the skirt and bolero in cream and burgundy cotton gingham. I think I'm going to flat fell the shoulder and side seams of the bolero, and finish the armhole seams with bias binding. I'm not sure what to do with the skirt seams, though. Flat felling doesn't seem right. What would be a period-appropriate seam finish for a cotton skirt? There are suggestions on the pattern, of course, but I'm interested in what's found on originals.
 

TheSacredFemme

One of the Regulars
Messages
120
Location
Jolly England
I'm in such a serious sewing rut at the moment! Ant advice? I think I attempted to tackle a far too difficult project and it took the joy out of it for me, so now even looking at my sewing machine makes me feel like a bit of a failure.
 

Joie DeVive

One Too Many
Messages
1,308
Location
Colorado
I think I attempted to tackle a far too difficult project and it took the joy out of it for me, so now even looking at my sewing machine makes me feel like a bit of a failure.

The last time I felt like this, I picked out an adorable fabric, and a sure fire apron pattern that I'd had success with before, and made that my next project. It went quickly, gave darling results and a sense of accomplishment. It helped me go back to the project I was struggling with. :)
 

Drappa

One Too Many
Messages
1,141
Location
Hampshire, UK
I have a question on seam finish that I'm hoping someone can help with. I'm making an outfit for my wife from a 1950s pattern (New York 1403), which has a shirt, blouse, and bolero. It will be an unlined summer outfit, with the skirt and bolero in cream and burgundy cotton gingham. I think I'm going to flat fell the shoulder and side seams of the bolero, and finish the armhole seams with bias binding. I'm not sure what to do with the skirt seams, though. Flat felling doesn't seem right. What would be a period-appropriate seam finish for a cotton skirt? There are suggestions on the pattern, of course, but I'm interested in what's found on originals.

Most of my dresses or skirts from this period have pinked seams, which is sadly not that durable. I would probably do French seams or Hong Kong finished seams.
 

Joie DeVive

One Too Many
Messages
1,308
Location
Colorado
Most of my dresses or skirts from this period have pinked seams, which is sadly not that durable. I would probably do French seams or Hong Kong finished seams.

I agree with Drappa. Most homemade originals I have are just pinked, and that doesn't hold up overly well. I think French seams look the best and are very durable, however, they only work on straight seams. If you have curves, the Hong Kong (aka Faux French) give almost the same look and durability, but can be used on curves.
 

sheeplady

I'll Lock Up
Bartender
Messages
4,481
Location
Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, USA
Don't pink the seams! Please don't! I did that on a 1890-period dress I did in high school and I regret it. :(

As far as the rut, both ladies before me had great advice. Pick something simple that you know you'll love. If you're working on a dress, pick something like a simple A-line skirt (perhaps that you've done before) that you can wear and get compliments on.

But in reality, sometimes we all need a break. I have lots of unfinished projects. Right now I have a sweater for my daughter that I started back when I was doing chemotherapy, and I know I am hesitant to finish it because of the emotions attached to it. My rule is I can do two new projects of the same type (sewing, crochet, woodworking- which is my new hobby) but then I have to come back and finish the original project. Sometimes you need the mental break, but you also want to finish it so it doesn't get you down permanently. This reminds me I need to finish that sweater, and will take it with me on my upcoming vacation to work on it during my down time.
 

St. Louis

Practically Family
Messages
613
Location
St. Louis, MO
The best recipe for getting out of any kind of a rut, whether sewing, knitting, or gardening, is to find a couple of like-minded people to join in the fun. I've never knitted or sewed so much as when I've had "bees" or knit-alongs. Okay, so a gardening bee wouldn't quite work, but my neighborhood here has a garden club, and I find the meetings pretty inspiring.

There are lots of ways to find a knitalong or a sewing club -- try Craig's List or Ravelry.
 

Alice~

One of the Regulars
Messages
138
Location
England
Hello all,

After telling myself I'd do it for years, I finally taught myself some basic sewing skills! I was wondering if anybody could recommend some simple sewing patterns for 1940s day dresses or shirtwaist dresses? Any help would definitely be appreciated. Thank you :)
 

St. Louis

Practically Family
Messages
613
Location
St. Louis, MO
Normally I recommend finding a vintage pattern, rather than a reproduction one, because that's the only way you'll really get an authentic look. But if you're just starting to sew you will probably want to work with a modern pattern. Many of the 1930s and 40s originals don't have printed markings and the pattern instructions presume a lot of sewing knowledge. Modern patterns have multiple size lines, clear instructions, and all the markings you need. Once you've mastered those, an original pattern won't be so intimidating.

I browsed around to find some modern "vintage style" patterns, and I'm afraid I didn't find any that resembled what you're looking for.: a 40s shirtwaist. Yet I'd say that at least 80 percent of dress patterns (probably more) sold during the 1940s were probably some kind of shirtwaist or princess style. So I think your decision to make one of those is exactly right, if you want a real 40s look.

Simplicity 1587 and Simplicity 1777 are both pretty, though not shirtwaist styles.

Here's a Butterick pattern that has a good 40s look, again not a shirtwaist, but probably a little less tricky to make than the two Simplicity patterns above.
 

Alice~

One of the Regulars
Messages
138
Location
England
Thank you so much for the information and taking the time to make some suggestions! <3 I really appreciate it :) There's a walkthrough video on YouTube for the 1777, so I think that might be a good place to start. Thank you again!
 

TheSacredFemme

One of the Regulars
Messages
120
Location
Jolly England
Any advice from you ladies on how to alter an invisible zip in a pattern to a lapped zipper? I much prefer them but am not quite sure whether to account for more fabric etc?
 

Lady Day

I'll Lock Up
Bartender
Messages
9,087
Location
Crummy town, USA
You can either add the extra fabric before cutting to both pieces and adjust, or add it to the left piece and just use the seam allowance on the right piece for the under side. A good way to know what to add so you don't miss your seam is to base each piece at the seam so you know where to lay the zipper and how much extra fabric is needed for the lap.
 

TheSacredFemme

One of the Regulars
Messages
120
Location
Jolly England
Thank you so much, Lady Day! A little embarrassing as I have yet another question.
I have this great 1940s dress which is falling apart at the seams. I'm going to copy it and was just wondering if anyone knew what this detail in it was called. One side has what I could only describe as a little pocket that allows the waist go expand so one can fit it over their head. After it's been put on it is fastened down with a popper and tied.
I can imagine I could create it by making a little pocket. I've never seen it before so I cannot imagine that it is all too common!
cab984294b9fd8b0dacf22a8edea3d46.jpg
3c9847f7e04d014775c615cae31b5703.jpg



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

MarieAnne

Practically Family
Messages
555
Location
Ontario
That is a really neat closure! I don't know what it's called, and I've never seen it before. It looks pretty straight forward. A rectangle of fabric, one side is sewn to the back of the dress, and the opposite side of the rectangle is sewn to the front of the dress. The side seams are then lined up (with the rectangle sticking out) and sewn below and above the rectangle (maybe overlapping .5" on either side). The top and bottom of the rectangle are then closed by sewing from the fold to the nearest side seam.
 

Lenore

Practically Family
Messages
758
Location
Houston, Texas
I think I need to read this thread in ravenous fashion. My daughter is getting into cosplay and I was behind a sewing machine for the first time in 15 years. Not exactly like riding a bike.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Lady Day

I'll Lock Up
Bartender
Messages
9,087
Location
Crummy town, USA
Thank you so much, Lady Day! A little embarrassing as I have yet another question.
I have this great 1940s dress which is falling apart at the seams. I'm going to copy it and was just wondering if anyone knew what this detail in it was called. One side has what I could only describe as a little pocket that allows the waist go expand so one can fit it over their head. After it's been put on it is fastened down with a popper and tied.
I can imagine I could create it by making a little pocket. I've never seen it before so I cannot imagine that it is all too common!
cab984294b9fd8b0dacf22a8edea3d46.jpg
3c9847f7e04d014775c615cae31b5703.jpg



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Its simply a side placket. They just made it like a pocket. It's extra fabric to allow room for you to get into the garment and the snap fasteners keep it closed. Like a corset with a modesty panel.
 
Top